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Andersson, Martin O.
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Andersson, M. O., Tolf, C., Tamba, P., Stefanache, M., Radbea, G., Frangoulidis, D., . . . Chitimia-Dobler, L. (2018). Molecular survey of neglected bacterial pathogens reveals an abundant diversity of species and genotypes in ticks collected from animal hosts across Romania. Parasites & Vectors, 11, Article ID 144.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular survey of neglected bacterial pathogens reveals an abundant diversity of species and genotypes in ticks collected from animal hosts across Romania
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2018 (English)In: Parasites & Vectors, ISSN 1756-3305, E-ISSN 1756-3305, Vol. 11, article id 144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Ticks are transmitting a wide range of bacterial pathogens that cause substantial morbidity and mortality in domestic animals. The full pathogen burden transmitted by tick vectors is incompletely studied in many geographical areas, and extensive studies are required to fully understand the diversity and distribution of pathogens transmitted by ticks. Results: We sampled 824 ticks of 11 species collected in 19 counties in Romania. Ticks were collected mainly from dogs, but also from other domestic and wild animals, and were subjected to molecular screening for pathogens. Rickettsia spp. was the most commonly detected pathogen, occurring in 10.6% (87/824) of ticks. Several species were detected: Rickettsia helvetica, R. raoultii, R. massiliae, R. monacensis, R. slovaca and R. aeschlimannii. A single occurrence of the zoonotic bacterium Bartonella vinsonii berkhoffii was detected in a tick collected from a dog. Anaplasma phagocytophilum occurred in four samples, and sequences similar to Anaplasma marginale/ovis were abundant in ticks from ruminants. In addition, molecular screening showed that ticks from dogs were carrying an Ehrlichia species identical to the HF strain as well as the enigmatic zoonotic pathogen "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis". An organism similar to E. chaffeensis or E. muris was detected in an Ixodes ricinus collected from a fox. Conclusions: We describe an abundant diversity of bacterial tick-borne pathogens in ticks collected from animal hosts in Romania, both on the level of species and genotypes/strains within these species. Several findings were novel for Romania, including Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii that causes bacteremia and endocarditis in dogs. "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" was detected in a tick collected from a dog. Previously, a single case of infection in a dog was diagnosed in Germany. The results warrant further studies on the consequences of tick-borne pathogens in domestic animals in Romania.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Ticks, Neglected bacterial pathogens, Animal hosts, Romania
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72690 (URN)10.1186/s13071-018-2756-1 (DOI)000428286800001 ()29554947 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044202572 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-13 Created: 2018-04-13 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M. O., Radbea, G., Frangoulidis, D., Tomaso, H., Rubel, F., Nava, S. & Chitimia-Dobler, L. (2018). New records and host associations of the tick Ixodes apronophorus and the first detection of Ehrlichia sp HF in Romania. Parasitology Research, 117(4), 1285-1289
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New records and host associations of the tick Ixodes apronophorus and the first detection of Ehrlichia sp HF in Romania
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2018 (English)In: Parasitology Research, ISSN 0932-0113, E-ISSN 1432-1955, Vol. 117, no 4, p. 1285-1289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ixodes (Ixodes) apronophorus is a neglected tick species and its geographical distribution, host associations, and role as a disease vector are not well known. We collected I. apronophorus from several locations in Romania. Morphological identification of ticks was confirmed by analysis of 16S rDNA and 12S rDNA gene sequences. We report new host associations of I. apronophorus, which was collected from dogs, foxes, and a hare-all new hosts for this tick species in Romania. Furthermore, we report for the first time occurrence of Ehrlichia sp. HF in I. apronophorus. Ehrlichia sp. HF was identified by sequencing a part of the 16S rDNA gene and was found in 16% (3/19) of the tested ticks. Ehrlichia sp. HF has not been previously reported in Eastern Europe and seems to have a much larger geographic distribution than previously known. Currently, it is unknown whether I. apronophorus is a competent vector for Ehrlichia sp. HF, or if the findings in this study represent infection in the hosts, namely dogs and fox.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Ixodes apronophorus, Ehrlichia sp HF, Dogs, Romania
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72686 (URN)10.1007/s00436-018-5800-3 (DOI)000428240700035 ()29453647 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042126757 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-13 Created: 2018-04-13 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Dunaj, J., Moniuszko-Malinowska, A., Swiecicka, I., Andersson, M. O., Czupryna, P., Rutkowski, K., . . . Pancewicz, S. (2018). Tick-borne infections and co-infections in patients with non-specific symptoms in Poland. Advances in Medical Sciences, 63(1), 167-172
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tick-borne infections and co-infections in patients with non-specific symptoms in Poland
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2018 (English)In: Advances in Medical Sciences, ISSN 1896-1126, E-ISSN 1898-4002, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 167-172Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim of the study was the evaluation of the frequency of infections and co-infections among patients hospitalized because of non-specific symptoms after a tick bite.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Whole blood, serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples from 118 patients hospitalised for non-specific symptoms up to 8 weeks after tick bite from 2010 to 2013 were examined for tick-borne infections. ELISA, Western blot and/or molecular biology (PCR; fla gene; 16S rRNA; sequencing) and thin blood smears (MDD) were used. Control group included 50 healthy blood donors. All controls were tested with PCR and serology according to the same procedure as in patients.

RESULTS: Out of 118 patients 85 (72%) experienced headaches, 15 (13%) vertigo, 32 (27%) nausea, 17 (14%) vomiting, 37 (31%) muscle pain, 73 (62%) fever and 26 (22%) meningeal signs. 47.5% were infected with at least one tick-borne pathogen. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infection was confirmed with ELISA, Western blot in serum and/or (PCR (fla gene) in whole blood in 29.7% cases. In blood of 11.9% patients Anaplasma phagocytophilum DNA (16S rRNA gene) was detected; in 0.9% patients 1/118 Babesia spp. DNA (18S rRNA gene) was also detected. Co-infections were observed in 5.1% of patients with non-specific symptoms. B. burgdorferi s.l. - A. phagocytophilum co-infection (5/118; 4.2%) was most common. In 1/118 (0.8%) A. phagocytophilum - Babesia spp. co-infection was detected. All controls were negative for examined pathogens.

CONCLUSIONS: Non-specific symptoms after tick bite may be caused by uncommon pathogens or co-infection, therefore it should be considered in differential diagnosis after tick bite.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Co-infection, Non-specific symptoms
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74143 (URN)10.1016/j.advms.2017.09.004 (DOI)000429821200025 ()29120859 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032920095 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-09 Created: 2018-05-09 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M. O., Marga, G., Banu, T., Dobler, G. & Chitimia-Dobler, L. (2018). Tick-borne pathogens in tick species infesting humans in Sibiu County, central Romania. Parasitology Research, 117(5), 1591-1597
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tick-borne pathogens in tick species infesting humans in Sibiu County, central Romania
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2018 (English)In: Parasitology Research, ISSN 0932-0113, E-ISSN 1432-1955, Vol. 117, no 5, p. 1591-1597Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Romania has a highly diverse tick fauna. Consequently, a high diversity of tick-transmitted pathogens might be a potential threat to humans. However, only a limited number of tick species regularly infest humans, and pathogens present in such species are therefore of particular interest from a medical perspective. In this study, 297 ticks were collected from humans during 2013 and 2014. Ixodes ricinus was the predominant tick species, accounting for 272 specimens or 91.6% of the ticks in the study. Nevertheless, other tick species were also found to infest humans: Dermacentor marginatus constituted 7% of the ticks found on humans (21/297), Haemaphysalis punctata 1% (3/297), and Haemaphysalis concinna 0.3% (1/297). Ticks were tested by PCR for a wide range of tick-borne pathogens. In total, 11.8% of the ticks carried human pathogenic bacteria, while no viral or protozoan pathogens were detected. The most frequently detected pathogen was Rickettsia spp., occurring in 5.4% of the ticks (16/297) and comprising three species: Rickettsia (R.) raoultii, R. monacensis, and R. helvetica. Borrelia s.l. occurred in 3% (9/297) of the ticks. "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" occurred in 1.7% (5/297) and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in 1.3% (4/297). Anaplasma bovis was detected in an H. punctata and Borrelia miyamotoi in an I. ricinus. These results point to the need for further studies on the medical importance of tick-borne pathogens in Romania.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Humans, Ticks, Tick-borne diseases, Sibiu County, Romania
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76773 (URN)10.1007/s00436-018-5848-0 (DOI)000430833000029 ()29589118 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044445962 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-11 Created: 2018-07-11 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M. O., Tolf, C., Tamba, P., Stefanache, M., Radbea, G., Rubel, F., . . . Chitimia-Dobler, L. (2017). Babesia, Theileria, and Hepatozoon species in ticks infesting animal hosts in Romania. Parasitology Research, 116(8), 2291-2297
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Babesia, Theileria, and Hepatozoon species in ticks infesting animal hosts in Romania
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2017 (English)In: Parasitology Research, ISSN 0932-0113, E-ISSN 1432-1955, Vol. 116, no 8, p. 2291-2297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Babesia spp., Theileria spp., and Hepatozoon spp. are tick-transmitted apicomplexan parasites that cause several important diseases in animals. To increase current knowledge about the diversity of tick-transmitted pathogens in Romania, we investigated the occurrence of Babesia spp., Theileria spp., and Hepatozoon spp. in a wide range of tick species infesting animal hosts. We collected 852 ticks from 10 different animal species from 20 counties in Romania. The assessment was based on detection of parasite DNA by PCR. Five different apicomplexan parasite species were detected; among them three different species of Babesia: B. canis, B. microti, and B. ovis. Hepatozoon canis was the most frequently detected parasite, found predominately in Ixodes ricinus ticks collected from domestic dogs. It was also detected in I. ricinus collected from goat, fox, and cat. Furthermore, H. canis was found in Haemaphysalis punctata and Haemaphysalis concinna ticks. In addition, Theileria buffeli was detected in Rhipicephalus bursa ticks collected from cattle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Ticks, Babesia, Theileria, Hepatozoon, Romania
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67500 (URN)10.1007/s00436-017-5537-4 (DOI)000406423300026 ()2-s2.0-85021826833 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-29 Created: 2017-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M. O., Tolf, C., Tamba, P., Stefanache, M., Waldenström, J., Dobler, G. & Chitimia-Dobler, L. (2017). Canine tick-borne diseases in pet dogs from Romania. Parasites & Vectors, 10, Article ID 2092.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Canine tick-borne diseases in pet dogs from Romania
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2017 (English)In: Parasites & Vectors, ISSN 1756-3305, E-ISSN 1756-3305, Vol. 10, article id 2092Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Tick-borne diseases are of substantial concern worldwide for animals as well as humans. Dogs have been a human companion for millennia, and their significant impact on human life renders disease in dogs to be of great concern. Tick-borne diseases in dogs represent a substantial diagnostic challenge for veterinarians in that clinical signs are often diffuse and overlapping. In addition, co-infections with two or more pathogens enhance this problem further. Molecular methods are useful to disentangle co-infections and to accurately describe prevalence and geographical distribution of tick-borne diseases. At this point, this information is lacking in many areas worldwide. Romania is one such area, where prevalence and distribution of several important pathogens need to be further investigated. To address this, we screened blood samples from 96 sick dogs with molecular methods for eight different pathogens including Babesia spp., Theileria spp., Hepatozoon spp., Anaplasma spp., Ehrlichia spp., "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis", Mycoplasma spp., and Borrelia spp. Results: As many as 45% (43/ 96) of the dogs in the study were infected with protozoan parasites. Babesia canis was the most frequent of these (28 infected dogs), whereas Hepatozoon canis was detected in 15% (14/ 96) and Babesia gibsoni was found in a single sample. Bacterial infection with Mycoplasma spp. occurred in 18% (17/ 96) of the sampled dogs. Obtained bacterial sequences revealed the occurrence of two species: Mycoplasma canis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum". In several cases co-infection with protozoan parasites and Mycoplasma sp. were detected. All dogs were negative for Anaplasma spp., Ehrlichia spp., "Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis", and for Borrelia spp. Conclusions: The results from the present study reinforce the notion that Babesia canis is an important pathogen in the Romanian dog population. However, more surprisingly, another protozoan species, H. canis, seems to be infecting dogs to a larger extent than previously recognized in Romania. Well-known tick-borne bacterial disease agents such as Anaplasma spp. and Borrelia spp. were not detected. In contrast, less wellstudied bacteria such as hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. were detected frequently. Moreover, co-infection might aggravate disease and complicate diagnosis and should be further studied in dogs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Dogs, Canis familiaris, Vector-borne diseases, Tick-borne diseases, Romania
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64194 (URN)10.1186/s13071-017-2092-x (DOI)000397764500003 ()28335825 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85016121197 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M. O., Vichova, B., Tolf, C., Krzyzanowska, S., Waldenström, J. & Karlsson, M. E. (2017). Co-infection with Babesia divergens and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in cattle (Bos taurus), Sweden. Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, 8(6), 933-935
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-infection with Babesia divergens and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in cattle (Bos taurus), Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, ISSN 1877-959X, E-ISSN 1877-9603, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 933-935Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Babesiosis is a severe disease in cattle worldwide. In Europe, the main causative agent of bovine babesiosis is Babesia divergens. In some areas, this species is reported to have declined or even disappeared, and its etiological role overtaken by other piroplasmid species. Moreover, co-infection with other tick-transmitted pathogens can be expected to complicate diagnosis in cattle. Hence, molecular identification of the causative agent of babesiosis should be a priority. Therefore, samples from 71 domestic cattle, 39 with clinical signs of babesiosis and 32 without, from southern Sweden were screened for Babesia spp. and Anaplasma spp. using molecular methods Babesia divergens was detected in 38 of the samples, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in 17. Co-infections with both pathogens were frequent, occurring in 18% of the animals with a B. divergens infection. The possibility of co-infection should be considered in diagnosis and treatment of bovine babesiosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Co-infection, Zoonotic disease, Tick-borne disease, Sweden
National Category
Microbiology Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68560 (URN)10.1016/j.ttbdis.2017.08.005 (DOI)000412378600018 ()28869191 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028363647 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-01 Created: 2017-11-01 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M. O. & Chitimia-Dobler, L. (2017). Detection of Cercopithifilaria bainae in western Romania. Parasitology Research, 116(11), 3235-3238
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection of Cercopithifilaria bainae in western Romania
2017 (English)In: Parasitology Research, ISSN 0932-0113, E-ISSN 1432-1955, Vol. 116, no 11, p. 3235-3238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cercopithifilaria species are tick-transmitted filarial parasites of mammals. In Europe, three Cercopithifilaria spp. are known to parasitize dogs, all occurring mainly in the Mediterranean countries. In Romania, Cercopithifilaria bainae has been reported in a single dog in eastern Romania but the occurrence in other parts of the country is not known. To further elucidate the geographic distribution of Cercopithifilaria spp. infection, 544 ticks were collected from dogs in several locations across Romania. The presence of Cercopithifilaria spp. was investigated with real-time PCR. A single Dermacentor reticulatus female tick was found to be infected with Cercopithifilaria bainae. The finding in the present study is geographically separated from the previous finding in Romania by 800 km, as well as by the Carpathian mountain range. Hence, C. bainae is more geographically widespread in Romania than previously recognized. However, the single detection does suggest that infection is rather uncommon in Romanian dogs. Nevertheless, further studies on Cercopithifilaria spp. distribution and prevalence are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Filaria, Nematode, Tick, Timisoara
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68899 (URN)10.1007/s00436-017-5625-5 (DOI)000413979600037 ()28956159 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030100778 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Raberg, L., Hagstrom, A., Andersson, M. O., Bartkova, S., Scherman, K., Strandh, M. & Tschirren, B. (2017). Evolution of antigenic diversity in the tick-transmitted bacterium Borrelia afzelii: a role for host specialization?. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 30(5), 1034-1041
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolution of antigenic diversity in the tick-transmitted bacterium Borrelia afzelii: a role for host specialization?
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 1034-1041Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antigenic diversity in pathogenic microbes can be a result of at least three different processes: diversifying selection by acquired immunity, host-pathogen coevolution and/or host specialization. Here, we investigate whether host specialization drives diversity at ospC (which encodes an immunodominant surface protein) in the tick-transmitted bacterium Borrelia afzelii. We determined prevalence and infection intensity of ospC strains in naturally infected wild mammals (rodents and shrews) by 454 amplicon sequencing in combination with qPCR. Neither prevalence nor infection intensity of specific ospC strains varied in a species-specific manner (i.e. there were no significant ospCxhost species interactions). Rankings of ospC prevalences were strongly positively correlated across host species. Rankings of ospC infection intensities were correlated more weakly, but only in one case significantly <1. ospC prevalences in the studied mammals were similar to those in ticks sampled at the study site, indicating that we did not miss any mammal species that are important hosts for specific ospC strains. Based on this, we conclude that there is at best limited host specialization in B.afzelii and that other processes are likely the main drivers of ospC diversity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
antigenic diversity, ecological specialization, Lyme borreliosis
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66999 (URN)10.1111/jeb.13075 (DOI)000400783800015 ()28345277 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018999844 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-19 Created: 2017-07-19 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M. O., Bergvall, U. A., Chirico, J., Christensson, M., Lindgren, P.-E., Nordström, J. & Kjellander, P. (2016). Molecular detection of Babesia capreoli and Babesia venatorum in wild Swedish roe deer, Capreolus capreolus. Parasites & Vectors, 9, Article ID 221.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular detection of Babesia capreoli and Babesia venatorum in wild Swedish roe deer, Capreolus capreolus
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2016 (English)In: Parasites & Vectors, ISSN 1756-3305, E-ISSN 1756-3305, Vol. 9, article id 221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The epidemiology of the zoonotic tick-transmitted parasite Babesia spp. and its occurrence in wild reservoir hosts in Sweden is unclear. In European deer, several parasite species, including Babesia capreoli and the zoonotic B. venatorum and B. divergens has been reported previously. The European roe deer, Capreolus capreolus, is an important and common part of the indigenous fauna in Europe, as well as an important host for Ixodes ricinus ticks, the vector of several Babesia spp. in Europe. Here, we aimed to investigate the occurrence of Babesia spp. in roe deer in Sweden. Findings: Roe deer (n = 77) were caught and sampled for blood. Babesia spp. was detected with a PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene. The prevalence of Babesia spp. was 52 %, and two species were detected; B. capreoli and B. venatorum in 44 and 7.8 % of the individuals, respectively. Infection occurred both in summer and winter. Conclusions: We showed that roe deer in Sweden, close to the edge of their northern inland distributional range, are infected with Babesia spp. The occurrence of B. venatorum in roe deer imply that it is established in Sweden and the zoonotic implication of this finding should be regarded to a greater extent in future.

National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-53275 (URN)10.1186/s13071-016-1503-8 (DOI)000375038700001 ()2-s2.0-85007500589 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-10 Created: 2016-06-10 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
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