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Selinus, Olle
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Finkelman, R. B., Orem, W. H., Plumlee, G. S. & Selinus, O. (2018). Applications of geochemistry to medical geology (2nd ed.ed.). In: Benedetto De Vivo, Harvey E. Belkin & Annamaria Lima (Ed.), Environmental geochemistry: site characterization, data analysis and case histories (pp. 435-465). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applications of geochemistry to medical geology
2018 (English)In: Environmental geochemistry: site characterization, data analysis and case histories / [ed] Benedetto De Vivo, Harvey E. Belkin & Annamaria Lima, Elsevier, 2018, 2nd ed., p. 435-465Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The discipline of geochemistry provides insights into how the natural environment impacts animal and human health and is the basis for the important subdiscipline of medical geochemistry. Among the more important contributions of medical geochemistry are the maps illustrating the distribution, on various scales, of potentially toxic trace elements. Chemical analyses of surface water and groundwater, stream sediments, and soil horizons have been published by numerous countries covering large geographic regions. Among the most comprehensive compilations is the Geochemical Atlas of Europe containing analytical data on more than 50 elements from stream water, stream sediment, and three soil horizons in 26 countries. Geochemical processes play a variety of important roles in controlling how humans are exposed to potential toxicants in a wide range of geogenic or anthropogenic materials. Once taken up by the body, geogenic materials such as dusts, soils, and water and their contained toxicants can react chemically with the body's fluids, and these chemical interactions can play key roles in toxicity. In addition to the harmful effects of some geogenic materials, certain clays have demonstrated remarkable antimicrobial properties when applied to open wounds with bacterial infections. Numerous case studies illustrate the potential human health impacts of organic compounds from geogenic sources, and especially those from fossil energy deposits. This is a challenging area of study since disease(s) resulting from exposures may be chronic rather than acute, and involve complex mixtures of substances. Medical geochemistry can play a key role in helping to protect the safety of drinking water by identifying the sources, concentrations, and forms of potentially harmful elements such as arsenic, mercury, and fluorine in natural waters. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of coals has helped to identify the sources of health problems afflicting millions of people worldwide.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018 Edition: 2nd ed.
Keywords
Arsenic, Balkan Endemic Nephropathy, Bioaccessibility, Bioreactivity, Coal, Fluorine, Geochemical mapping
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Environmental Science, Environmental Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-84314 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-444-63763-5.00018-5 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050043751 (Scopus ID)9780444637635 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Bjorklund, G., Christophersen, O. A., Chirumbolo, S., Selinus, O. & Aaseth, J. (2017). Recent aspects of uranium toxicology in medical geology. Environmental Research, 156, 526-533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recent aspects of uranium toxicology in medical geology
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2017 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 156, p. 526-533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Uranium (U) is a chemo-toxic, radiotoxic and even a carcinogenic element. Due to its radioactivity, the effects of U on humans health have been extensively investigated. Prolonged U exposure may cause kidney disease and cancer. The geological distribution of U radionuclides is still a great concern for human health. Uranium in groundwater, frequently used as drinking water, and general environmental pollution with U raise concerns about the potential public health problem in several areas of Asia. The particular paleo-geological hallmark of India and other Southern Asiatic regions enhances the risk of U pollution in rural and urban communities. This paper highlights different health and environmental aspects of U as well as uptake and intake. It discusses levels of U in soil and water and the related health issues. Also described are different issues of U pollution, such as U and fertilizers, occupational exposure in miners, use and hazards of U in weapons (depleted U), U and plutonium as catalysts in the reaction between DNA and H2O2, and recycling of U from groundwater to surface soils in irrigation. For use in medical geology and U research, large databases and data warehouses are currently available in Europe and the United States.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Uranium, Environment, Mining, Health, Depleted uranium, Drinking water
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66904 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2017.04.010 (DOI)000403735300063 ()28431380 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-07-13 Created: 2017-07-13 Last updated: 2017-07-13Bibliographically approved
Centeno, J. A., Finkelman, R. B. & Selinus, O. (2016). Medical Geology: Impacts of the Natural Environment on Public Health. Geosciences, 6(1), Article ID UNSP 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Medical Geology: Impacts of the Natural Environment on Public Health
2016 (English)In: Geosciences, E-ISSN 2076-3263, Vol. 6, no 1, article id UNSP 8Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72770 (URN)10.3390/geosciences6010008 (DOI)000410142600008 ()
Available from: 2018-04-17 Created: 2018-04-17 Last updated: 2018-04-17Bibliographically approved
Buck, B. J., Londono, S. C., McLaurin, B. T., Metcalf, R., Mouri, H., Selinus, O. & Shelembe, R. (2016). The emerging field of medical geology in brief: some examples. Environmental Earth Sciences, 75(6), Article ID 449.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The emerging field of medical geology in brief: some examples
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2016 (English)In: Environmental Earth Sciences, ISSN 1866-6280, E-ISSN 1866-6299, Vol. 75, no 6, article id 449Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Emerging medical problems present medical practitioners with many difficult challenges. Emergent disciplines may offer the medical community new opportunities to address a range of these diseases. One such emerging discipline is medical geology, a science that is dealing with the influence of natural environmental factors on the geographical distribution of health in humans and animals. It involves the study of the processes and causes of diseases and also the use research findings to present solutions to health problems.

National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-52118 (URN)10.1007/s12665-016-5362-6 (DOI)000372251000001 ()
Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Kozisek, F., Rosborg, I., Selinus, O., Ferrante, M. & Jovanovic, D. (2015). Background. In: Ingegerd Rosborg (Ed.), Drinking Water Minerals and Mineral Balance: Importance, Health Significance, Safety Precautions (pp. 1-23). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Background
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2015 (English)In: Drinking Water Minerals and Mineral Balance: Importance, Health Significance, Safety Precautions / [ed] Ingegerd Rosborg, Springer, 2015, p. 1-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Water plays an important role in the body. Normal–weight adults need 2.0–2.5 L/day of water for proper hydration, and it is known for centuries that minerals from the water are important for humans and animals. Different minerals are important in different ranges for different organs and functions. Due to the mass–related need for the minerals, they are labeled macro and micro elements, respectively. Weathering of rocks is responsible for most of the minerals appearing in water. The importance of minerals from drinking water have been denied for some time. However, in districts of Norway, high frequencies of softening of bone tissue among domestic animals, later identified as phosphorous-deficient soils and water, was known hundreds of years ago, and parts of China had increased levels of heart failure, nowadays identified as low selenium. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, well–off people in Europe went to health resorts to drink their specific water, water chosen with mineral content expected to be good for a specific complaint.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
National Category
Other Health Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-63489 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-09593-6_1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85017459288 (Scopus ID)9783319095936 (ISBN)9783319095929 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-05-09 Created: 2017-05-09 Last updated: 2017-05-10Bibliographically approved
Selinus, O. (Ed.). (2013). Essentials of medical geology: Revised edition (2ed.). Dordrecht: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Essentials of medical geology: Revised edition
2013 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Essentials of Medical Geology reviews the essential concepts and practical tools required to tackle environmental and public health problems. It is organized into four main sections. The first section deals with the fundamentals of environmental biology, the natural and anthropogenic sources of health elements that impact health and illustrate key biogeochemical transformations. The second section looks at the geological processes influencing human exposure to specific elements, such as radon, arsenic, fluorine, selenium and iodine. The third section presents the concepts and techniques of pathology, toxicology and epidemiology that underpin investigations into the human health effects of exposure to naturally occurring elements. The last section provides a toolbox of analytical approaches to environmental research and medical geology investigations. Essentials of Medical Geology was first published in 2005 and has since won three prestigious rewards. The book has been recognized as a key book in both medical and geology fields and is widely used as textbook and reference book in these fields. For this revised edition, editors and authors have updated the content that evolved a lot during 2005 and added two new chapters, on public health, and agriculture and health. This updated volume can now continue to be used as a textbook and reference book for all who are interested in this important topic and its impacts the health and wellbeing of many millions of people all over the world. Addresses key topics at the intersection of environmental science and human health. Developed by 60 international experts from 20 countries and edited by professionals from the International Medical Geology Association (IMGA). Written in non-technical language for a broad spectrum of readers, ranging from students and professional researchers to policymakers and the general public. Includes color illustrations throughout, references for further investigation and other aids to the reader.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer, 2013. p. 805 Edition: 2
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-63224 (URN)10.1007/978-94-007-4375-5 (DOI)2-s2.0-84956502663 (Scopus ID)9789400743755 (ISBN)9789400743748 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-05-09 Created: 2017-05-09 Last updated: 2017-05-09Bibliographically approved
Davies, B. E., Bowman, C., Davies, T. C. & Selinus, O. (2013). Medical geology: Perspectives and prospects. In: Olle Selinus (Ed.), Essentials of Medical Geology: Revised Edition (pp. 1-13). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Medical geology: Perspectives and prospects
2013 (English)In: Essentials of Medical Geology: Revised Edition / [ed] Olle Selinus, Springer, 2013, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter is a brief history of medical geology—the study of health problems related to ‘place.’ This overview is not exhaustive; instead, it highlights some important cases that have arisen during the development of the science of medical geology. An excess, deficiency or imbalance of inorganic elements originating from geological sources can affect human and animal well-being either directly (e.g., a lack of dietary iodine leading to goitre) or indirectly (e.g., effect on metabolic processes such as the supposed protective effect of selenium in cardiovascular disease). Such links have long been known but were unexplained until alchemy evolved into chemistry in the seventeenth century, when medicine ceased to be the art of monks versed in homeopathic remedies and experimental explanations of disease was sought rather than relying on the writings of the Classical Greek philosophers, and modern geology was forged by Lyell and Hutton. In addition, the exploitation of mineral resources gathered pace in the seventeenth century and brought in its train the widespread release of toxic elements to the environment. New sciences of public health and industrial hygiene emerged and their studies have helped inform our understanding of the health implications of the natural occurrence of these elements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-63204 (URN)10.1007/978-94-007-4375-5_1 (DOI)2-s2.0-84961355899 (Scopus ID)9789400743755 (ISBN)9789400743748 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-05-09 Created: 2017-05-09 Last updated: 2017-05-09Bibliographically approved
Zhang, C., Selinus, O., Hursthouse, A. S., Xia, X. & Ding, S. (2013). Preface: selected papers from SESEH 2012 Sino-European Symposium on Environment and Health. Environmental Geochemistry and Health, 35(5), 551-552
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preface: selected papers from SESEH 2012 Sino-European Symposium on Environment and Health
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2013 (English)In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health, ISSN 0269-4042, E-ISSN 1573-2983, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 551-552Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-29199 (URN)10.1007/s10653-013-9552-9 (DOI)000323640600001 ()2-s2.0-84883049865 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-10-08 Created: 2013-10-03 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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