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Adolfsson, Carl-Henrik, Fil doktor
Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Adolfsson, C.-H. & Håkansson, J. (2019). Evaluating teacher and school development by learning capital: a conceptual contribution to a fundamental problem. Improving Schools, 22(2), 130-143
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating teacher and school development by learning capital: a conceptual contribution to a fundamental problem
2019 (English)In: Improving Schools, ISSN 1365-4802, E-ISSN 1475-7583, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 130-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In light of an international policy movement to increase focus on students’ academic achievement, the question of how to improve schools has become an important issue at all levels in the school system. Substantial resources have been invested in reforms to improve conditions for pupils’ learning. Great expectations and responsibility are often placed on teachers in terms of their professional development (PD), the aim being to improve their teaching practices. Consequently, the question of how to evaluate the results of school improvement programmes, including teachers’ PD, has arisen. However, there is a lack of theoretical concepts that can capture the outcomes of such development in a qualified way. Taking inspiration from the research on teachers’ PD and theories relating to teachers’ knowledge and capabilities, the aim of this study is to outline a conceptual framework that can serve as an analytical tool when evaluating both school improvement initiatives in general and school actors’ learning in particular. Four types of learning capital that are intended to reflect the central aspects of teachers’ and school organisations’ learning and the capabilities linked to teaching practice and its development are outlined. This conceptual framework is applied and exemplified based on the results of a three-year research project evaluating a school improvement programme in a Swedish municipality. Finally, some conclusions are drawn regarding the different types of analysis possible with the current conceptual framework related to the evaluation of school improvement efforts.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
School improvement, Teachers’ Professional Development, Learning Capital, Evaluation
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74724 (URN)10.1177/1365480218784039 (DOI)000469861900003 ()2-s2.0-85049639247 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Wahlström, N., Adolfsson, C.-H. & Vogt, B. (2019). Making Social Studies in Standards-Based Curricula.. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Education Research Conference, Uppsala, March 6-8..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making Social Studies in Standards-Based Curricula.
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, a knowledge debate was initiated in the early 1990s through the official report School for Bildung (SOU 1992:94). The purpose of the report was two-fold: to widen the concept of knowledge from a one-sided cognitive meaning and to offer ‘new’ concepts of knowledge adapted to a performance model (Bernstein 2000) of school curriculum. Since this debate, school reforms, including new grading systems, have been continuous but the knowledge base in curriculum has remained the same. In Sweden, there is currently a major debate on the status of "facts" in the school's knowledge concept. One line of argument claims that the students do not get the opportunity to learn enough factual knowledge. Instead, the abilities have been dominating. However, factual knowledge is embedded in the abilities, because without factual knowledge the abilities become empty, the other argument goes. This debate, as well as a debate of the failure of the current “knowledge requirements” in curriculum to provide tools for equivalent grading, has led to an initiative from the Swedish National Agency for Education (NAE). The NAE has initiated a curriculum reform aiming at strengthen the clarity and equivalence in the content as well as in the knowledge requirements in the syllabi.

Aim

The purpose of this paper is to reintroduce a theoretically based dialogue on the relevance of current knowledge concepts in curricula in general, and the expressions of knowledge progression in particular. In this explorative study, we investigate the following research questions: How can factual knowledge be emphasized without being instrumental? How can the school's overarching goals and values be reflected in the syllabi? With what knowledge expressions can an equivalent assessment be promoted?

Theoretical framework and method

In the theoretical framework, we draw on Bernstein’s (2000) two pedagogical models, as well as his understanding of horizontal and vertical to place the Swedish curricula Lgr 11 and Lgy 11 in a broader typology. Following Deng & Luke (2008), we specifically discuss the knowledge concepts in the syllabi of civics for compulsory school and upper secondary school. To discuss the knowledge expressions in the knowledge requirements in terms of increased clarity and equivalence, we distinguish between knowledge in relation to content and achieved competences in relation to different levels of grading (Carlgren et al. 2009). In the result section, we present a revised version of syllabi in civics for Year 6 and 9 in compulsory school and Year 1 in upper secondary school.

Expected conclusions

We suggest that achieved competences need to be related to content in the knowledge requirements for increased clarity of what different forms of knowing that should be achieved.  Moreover, we introduce alternative terms for how different levels of competences could be expressed in the grading system to increase equivalence.

Keywords
curriculum making, social studies, typology, competences
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-87037 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Education Research Conference, Uppsala, March 6-8.
Available from: 2019-07-30 Created: 2019-07-30 Last updated: 2019-07-30
Adolfsson, C.-H. & Håkansson, J. (2019). The Local Education Authority’s Implementation of a Capacity-building model for school improvement – obstacles and possibilities. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2019 in Hamburg -"Education in an Era of Risk – the Role of Educational Research for the Future".
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Local Education Authority’s Implementation of a Capacity-building model for school improvement – obstacles and possibilities
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

General description on research questions, objectives and theoretical framework (600 words)

In school systems around the world, there is an increasing focus on pupils’ academic achievements and school results. This has resulted in an intensified control of pupils’ levels of achievement (cf. PISA) and increasing demands for school actors and decision-makers to improve schools. In this respect, Sweden is no exception. Ages of declining student achievement, decreased equality between schools have spurred an intensive critique against the Swedish school system and triggered a more state-regulated governing of the school system in terms of several national reforms, which altogether aim to take control over the schools’ outcome (Wahlström & Sundberg, 2017; Adolfsson, 2018). In light of such a policy movement the Local Education Authorities (LEA) and schools’ responsibility for pupils’ achievement and equality have been highlighted and strengthened in Swedish policy. In addition, to ensure the quality of the teaching and the professionalism of the teachers, a revision of the Swedish Education Act was carried out in 2010. This revision stipulated, among other things, that all schools and local school authorities must conduct a systematic improvement work. This had led to a discussion of how school on a local basis can build capacity to improve themselves. In this context, LEA, in the Swedish municipalities, have become important policy actors (Wahlström & Sundberg, 2017b). To strengthen the schools own capacity for improvement, but also to increase the control over the schools’ processes and outcomes, the construction and implementation of different quality systems has been an important strategy for the local education authorities (Adolfsson & Alvunger, 2017; Håkansson & Sundberg, 2016).

In this paper, we will put this ‘meso-level’, i.e. the relationship between LEA and the schools, in focus. We mean that this is an important, but many times overlooked, relationship when it comes to understand processes and outcomes related to the implementation of local quality systems and school improvement initiatives (Rorrer, Skrla & Scheurich, 2008). Based on an ongoing three-year research project in a major municipality in Sweden, the overall aim is to investigate a LEA: s attempt to implement a new quality system at the schools in the municipality, as a way to control and strengthen the schools’ improvement work. The following research questions are addressed in the paper:

1. How and which central aspects of the schools’ improvement work tries LEA control and strengthened through the implementation of a new quality system?

2. In what w   ay do school actors respond to LES’s attempt to implement the quality system?

3. Which different factors can be distinguished as notably important for the outcome of the implementation process?

The relationship between the LED and the current schools are understood and analysed from a neo-institutional theoretical perspective (Scott, 2008). From this perspective, three dimensions can be highlighted regarding how institutions (in this case the LED and the current schools) seek to control and affect other institutions, respond to external pressure and seek legitimacy: regulative (rules and sanctions), normative (prevalent norms, expectations and ideals ), and cognitive-cultural/discursive (shared conceptions and frames of meaning-making). This perspective enable us to elucidate the character of the different strategies and actions that LED undertake in the implementation of the new quality model. To understand the implementation processes that occurred at the different schools, theoretical inspiration is acquired from implementation theory (Fixen et al. 2005; Lundquist, 1987; Lipsky, 1980). This theory put analytical focus on central implementation factors such as clarity, school actors knowledge, legitimacy, time, leadership, organisation, school culture etc, which thus help us to understand the result of the implementation processes of the different schools. 

Methods/methodology (400 words)

The overall research project, which this specific study is conducted within, has a mixed-method inspired design. The aim with such an approach is to deepening the understanding of the current research questions being addressed through obtaining different, but complementary data on the phenomenon that stand in focus for the study (Cresswell, 2010; Cresswell and Clark, 2007). In this specific sub-study, we have followed the education authority’s implementation process at six different schools in the current municipality. The current schools are located in areas with differences in socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds and each school was followed for a school year, which made it possible to contextually place and understand the implementation process within the structure, organization and culture of the schools.

In line with the theoretical points of departure and the general aim to elucidate patterns of the local school authority’s implementation of the new quality system and school actors’ understanding and response of the quality system, following methods and empirical data have been used. i) content analysis of central policy documents ii)  observations (n=xx) iii) 24 semi-structured interviews with key actors at the different schools (n=50). Accordingly, an extensive empirical material have been collected. To conduct a contextual understanding of each school, central documents regarding the local schools’ organisation, policy and vision, leading and management structure, pupils’ achievement, school improvement strategies were at a first step analysed. This contextual understanding was important for the next step, when data related to LEA implementation of the new quality system at the single schools were collected. This was carried out through participating observations at the different kinds of meetings that occurred amongst LEA and the current schools. Finally, as a way to deepen the understanding of the school actors’ response to the new quality system, semi-structured interviews with central key actors at the single school were carried out.

 

Expected outcomes (300 words)

The relationship between the LEA and the schools will finally be discussed and problematized in light of the following preliminary results:

-          The implementation of the quality system occurred through a number of steps: 1. an introduction meeting between represents from the LEA and key actors from the schools 2. a quality dialogue two months later and 3. a quality seminary arranged by the LEA where the principals from the involving schools were participating. In contrast to a more traditional ‘regulative’ strategy of governing the schools, the LEA’s implementation of the current quality system, in terms of these different activities, was characterized by a more normative and discursive way of controlling the schools’ improvement work (i.e. soft governance).

-          We could distinguish a variety in the initial stage of the implementation process regarding in what degree the school actors consider the LEA’s quality system as legitimate. The same variety between the schools was notably concerning how they perceived the idea and the purpose behind the new quality system but also how LEA’s system should be incorporated with their own local quality systems.

-          Factors that may explain these differences in the implementation process is firstly, a notably ‘knowledge-gap’, that existed between the schools. That is, principals and other key actors’ knowledge and competencies about local systematic quality work in terms of, for example, data collection, interpretation and using different methods of analysis, seem to be crucial for the implementation process. A second crucial factor seems to be how the principals organized his or her school improvement work, including delegation of responsibility and how different school actors’ knowledge and competencies were used in an appropriate way.

Keywords
Local education authority (LEA), School improvement, Quality system, implementation theory
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89195 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2019 in Hamburg -"Education in an Era of Risk – the Role of Educational Research for the Future"
Available from: 2019-09-19 Created: 2019-09-19 Last updated: 2019-09-19
Adolfsson, C.-H. & Alvunger, D. (2018). A study on policy pressures and power dynamics in the changing landscape of local school governance. In: : . Paper presented at European Conference of Educational Research (ECER) in Bolzano, 3 – 7 September.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A study on policy pressures and power dynamics in the changing landscape of local school governance
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim with this paper is to explore local school governance in the Swedish schooling system by focusing on the local authority and principals through a lens of neo-institutional theory. The study is conducted against a backdrop of current trends in global and national educational policy where it in the Swedish context is possible to identify two major shifts:

 

  • new ways of how the state seeks to control the schools’ outcomes at the expense of the local authorities room for exercise of power– a ‘re-centralisation’
  • the emergence of a new dynamic between the local authority and principals.

 

In the early 1990s, the Swedish school system was decentralised and the municipalities were given authority for the governing of the schools. A new goal- and outcome-based quality system was introduced that put the municipalities in Sweden in a new position. However, during the last decades transnational organisations and associations such as the OECD and the EU have gained greater influence over education policy (Robertson & Dale, 2015). New policy spaces have emerged that transcend, but also converge within, national borders (Sassen, 2006). Accountability, standardisation and increased student results stand out as important ingredients in current global reform agendas (Wahlström & Sundberg, 2017a; Anderson-Levitt, 2008). In Sweden, declining student achievement in PISA has made policy-makers inclined to be informed by policy solutions from the OECD (Wahlström, 2017). Paired with a strong focus on student achievement, the notion of a school system in a state of crisis grew. Altogether, this have spurred an intensive critique against the decentralised schooling system and triggered a trend of ‘re-centralisation’ in Sweden, meaning a shift towards a more state-regulated governing of the school system (Wahlström & Sundberg, 2017; Adolfsson, 2013) . The government has introduced several reforms and incentives that involves the local management of schools. These include, for instance, a new national curriculum for the compulsory and the upper secondary schooling, a School Inspectorate for auditing and monitoring schools; A reformed Education Act emphasising the local authority’s responsibility for equity and student achievement, and strengthening the principals’ authority; Professional development programmes; and new specialist functions in school (Alvunger, 2015; Adolfsson & Alvunger, 2017). These policy movements have altogether challenged the relations between the state, the local authorities and the schools in Sweden. In light of these changes and with reference to the presented aim of this paper, we ask ourselves the following research questions:

  • How do representatives of the local authority experience and respond to the pressure and influence from the state through the focus on equity and the improvement of student results in national educational policy discourse?
  • What strategies do the local authority employ for governing the schools in the municipality?
  • In what ways do principals respond to the tension in the ‘dual’ governance from the state and the local authority?

 

The paper draws on a ‘classical’ theoretical and methodological framework of curriculum theory (i.e. the frame-factor theory), with its different levels of analysis – the societal/ideological level, the programmatic level; and the school/classroom level (Lundgren, 1972). When it comes to the more specific analysis of the consequences of the changed conditions of governing and exercise of control at the local policy level, a neo-institutional theoretical perspective will be used (Scott, 2008). From this perspective, three dimensions can be highlighted regarding how institutions seek to control and affect other institutions, respond to external pressure and seek legitimacy: regulative (rules and sanctions for legitimacy), normative (evaluation and moral legitimacy), and cognitive-cultural/discursive (shared conceptions and frames of meaning-making (2008).

 

Methods and material

 

This paper has a mixed-method design, where the research design aims at preserving the complexity and deepening the perspective of the research questions being addressed while at the same time obtaining different, but complementary data on the same phenomenon (Cresswell, 2010; Cresswell and Clark, 2007). The study of local governance with the local authority and principals is conducted in three steps. The first of the research questions, i.e. how representatives of the local authority experience and respond to policy pressure from the state, will be answered by using secondary data from a project that investigated the municipalities as policy actors in light of the implementation of the new national curriculum for compulsory schooling in Sweden (Wahlström & Sundberg, 2017). It includes a survey (n= 727) and interviews with representatives from local authorities in Sweden. The two remaining sets of research questions, comprising local authorities’ strategies for governing schools and principals’ responses, will be answered through a case study of a large municipality in southern Sweden (135 000 inhabitants) using a survey (n=61; response rate 62 %) to principals and 4 semi-structured focus-group interviews with principals and representatives of the local authority. The survey consisted of questions about experiences of the subsequent organisation, governing structures, the communication of aims between different levels, collaborative structures and arenas, professional development, curriculum support and the role of functions for school development. The quantitative data was then analysed and used for asking follow-up and questions in the interviews, targeting specific items regarding experiences of expectations from the institutional environment, policy pressures, governing structures and strategies to cope with certain arrangements in the environment. The interviews thus provided complementary qualitative data and gave a richer description of the principals’ views.

 

Expected outcomes

 

Representatives from the local authority emphasise that the national governance of schools to a higher extent and in a more explicit way is directed towards the schools as units as a result the recent educational reforms. They claim that the autonomy of principals following the Education act has created greater clarity. Meanwhile, it has impeded their agency in matters concerning enactment of government policy and curriculum. In combination with the emphasis on local authorities as being responsible for quality assurance, allocating resources for equity and student achievement, the local authorities’ ability to control internal processes of schools has decreased significantly. It seems that local authorities’ space for regulative sanctions and mechanisms has been weakened. In order to compensate, local authorities apply strategies of soft governance for controlling the schools. These strategies are characterised by normative and cognitive/discursive dimension and may be comprised by one or a combination of the following:

  • Re-structuring the organisation and controlling communication
  • Use expert teachers to monitor and control internal professional development/school improvement efforts of schools
  • Competition through rewarding schools which comply to reforms, show best practice and have high-performing students
  • Standardisation measures to ensure greater coherence and compliance

 

The principals describe a more generous space for action with the Education act, but they also experience a higher degree of pressure to improve student achievement and goal attainment, both from the local authority and from the state. This pressure is expressed in different ways. The local authority presents comparisons of results between schools which triggers competition. The principals are bound to report results or other statistical data on request, which in turn may cause a negative pressure from their teachers. In addition, principals describe how a lot of resources in terms of time and money are invested to ‘pass’ inspections from the national agency.

 

References

Adolfsson, C-H. (2013). Kunskapsfrågan – En läroplansteoretisk studie om gymnasieskolans reformer mellan 1960-talet och 2010-talet [The question of knowledge – a curriculum study of the Swedish upper secondary school reforms between the 1960s and 2010s]. Dissertation, Linnaeus University.

 

Adolfsson, C-H., & Alvunger, D. (2017). The nested systems of local school development : Understanding improved interaction and capacities in the different sub-systems of schools. Improving Schools. 20. 195-208.

 

Alvunger, D. (2015).
Towards new forms of educational leadership? The local implementation of förstelärare in Swedish schools.
Nordic Journal of Studies in Educational Policy, 1(3), 55–66.

 

Anderson-Levitt, K. M. (2008). Globalization and curriculum. In: M. F. Connelly (Ed.), The Sage handbook of curriculum and instruction (pp. 349–368). London: Sage Publications.

Creswell, J. W. (2010). Mapping the developing landscape of mixed methods research. In A. Tashakkori, & C. Teddlie (Eds.), Sage handbook of mixed methods in social & behavioral research (pp. 45–68). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Creswell, J. W., & Plano Clark, V. (2007). Designing and conducting mixed methods. London: SAGE.

Lundgren, U.P. (1972). Frame factors and the teaching process: A contribution to curriculum theory and theory of teaching. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell.

 

Robertson, S., & Dale, R. (2015). Towards a ‘critical cultural political economy’ account of the globalising of education, Globalisation, Societies and Education, 13(1), 149–170, DOI: 10.1080/14767724.2014.967502

Sassen, S. (2006). Territory, authority, rights: From medieval to global assemblages. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.


Scott, W. (2008). Approaching Adulthood: The Maturing of Institutional Theory. Theory and Society, 37(5), 427-442.

Wahlström, N., & Sundberg, D. (2017). Transnational curriculum standards and classroom practices. The new meaning of teaching. New York, NY: Routledge.

Wahlström, N. (2017). The travelling reform agenda: The Swedish case through the lens of OECD. In N. Wahlström, & D. Sundberg (Eds.), Transnational curriculum standards and classroom practices. The new meaning of teaching (pp. 15–30). New York, NY: Routledge.

 

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79626 (URN)
Conference
European Conference of Educational Research (ECER) in Bolzano, 3 – 7 September
Available from: 2019-01-18 Created: 2019-01-18 Last updated: 2019-02-12Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, C.-H. & Sundberg, D. (2018). Att forskningsbasera den svenska skolan: Policyinitiativ under 25 år. Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, 23(1-2), 39-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att forskningsbasera den svenska skolan: Policyinitiativ under 25 år
2018 (Swedish)In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 23, no 1-2, p. 39-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Även om ”en skola på vetenskaplig grund” idag är ett högaktuellt ämne är det ingalunda något nytt fenomen. I artikeln studeras tendenser i policyinitiativ som de senaste 25 åren haft till syfte att forskningsbasera den svenska skolan. Utgångspunkt tas i de problembilder som framkommer i policy samt vilka modeller för forskningsbasering som samtidigt lyfts fram som lösningen på dessa problem. Resultatet pekar mot att det de senaste 25 år har skett en succesiv förskjutning från indirekta till mer direkta initiativ. Under 1990-talet och det tidiga 2000-talet var många policyinitiativ ordnade utifrån att främst vilja skapa de rätta förutsättningarna för en forskningsbasering av skolan. Under 2000-talet blir initiativen alltmer fokuserade och ambitiös med syfte att åstadkomma direkta förändringar i lärares undervisning. När det kommer till modeller för forskningsbasering blir det samtidigt alltmer tydligt hur policy vänder sig till och söker legitimitet hos delvis nya aktörer och institutioner, som exempelvis hälso-sjukvården. Med detta går det också att urskilja en insnävning vad gäller att definiera och innehållsligt välja ut vilken forskning som bör sprids till skolans aktörer. Konsekvensen med en sådan modell för forskningsbasering menar vi kan bli att läraren främst får inta rollen som passiva mottagare av forskning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swedish Educational Research Association, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50561 (URN)
Available from: 2018-04-01 Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, C.-H. & Håkansson, J. (2018). Evaluating School Improvement Efforts: Pupils as Silent Result Suppliers, or Audible Improvement Resources?. International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, 17(6), 34-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating School Improvement Efforts: Pupils as Silent Result Suppliers, or Audible Improvement Resources?
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 34-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article contributes to a perspective of school development, where pupils‟ experiences of the teaching they encounter are regarded as a result of improvement work. In a three-year research collaboration with four nine-year compulsory schools in a large Swedish municipality, researchers have continuously conducted group interviews with different actors, collected relevant documentation and reported their preliminary analyses to the schools. In the light of previous research, the results show that the development areas that have been in focus in the schools have in some cases had an impact on the teaching. However, no homogenous change is evident. Rather, the variation between classrooms, teachers and subjects is great, especially if the pupils‟ perspectives are taken into consideration. The pupils‟ experiences and voices on how the improvement work materialises in the classroom contribute to explaining the connections, or lack of them, between the school and classroom levels. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Flacq: Society for Research and Knowledge Management, 2018
Keywords
school improvement; teaching; evaluation; pupils voice; learning experiences
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76684 (URN)10.26803/ijlter.17.6.3 (DOI)2-s2.0-85061225996 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-05 Created: 2018-07-05 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, C.-H., Sundberg, E. & Sundberg, D. (2018). Evidently, the Broker is the New Whiz-Kid at the Education Agora. In: NERA 2018 - 46th CONGRESS Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges: Abstracts. Paper presented at NERA 2018 - 46th CONGRESS. Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges. 8-10 March 2018 • University of Oslo, Norway. (pp. 106).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidently, the Broker is the New Whiz-Kid at the Education Agora
2018 (English)In: NERA 2018 - 46th CONGRESS Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges: Abstracts, 2018, p. 106-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74381 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2018 - 46th CONGRESS. Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges. 8-10 March 2018 • University of Oslo, Norway.
Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, C.-H., Sundberg, D. & Forsberg, E. (2018). Evidently, the Broker is the New Whiz-kid at the Education agora. In: : . Paper presented at EERA / ECER 2018 “Inclusion and Exclusion, Resources for Educational Research?”, 3 – 7 September,Bolzano, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidently, the Broker is the New Whiz-kid at the Education agora
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77614 (URN)
Conference
EERA / ECER 2018 “Inclusion and Exclusion, Resources for Educational Research?”, 3 – 7 September,Bolzano, Italy
Available from: 2018-09-08 Created: 2018-09-08 Last updated: 2019-02-12Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, C.-H., Forsberg, E. & Sundberg, D. (2018). När evidensrörelsen kom till den svenska skolan. In: Daniel Alvunger & Ninni Wahlström (Ed.), Den evidensbaserade skolan: Svensk skola i skärningspunkten mellan forskning och praktik (pp. 71-99). Stockholm: Natur och kultur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>När evidensrörelsen kom till den svenska skolan
2018 (Swedish)In: Den evidensbaserade skolan: Svensk skola i skärningspunkten mellan forskning och praktik / [ed] Daniel Alvunger & Ninni Wahlström, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018, p. 71-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71747 (URN)9789127817616 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, C.-H. & Alvunger, D. (2018). The selection of content and knowledge conceptions in the teaching of curriculum standards in compulsory schooling. In: Ninni Wahlström & Daniel Sundberg (Ed.), Transnational Curriculum Standards and Classroom Practices: The New Meaning of Teaching (pp. 98-115). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The selection of content and knowledge conceptions in the teaching of curriculum standards in compulsory schooling
2018 (English)In: Transnational Curriculum Standards and Classroom Practices: The New Meaning of Teaching / [ed] Ninni Wahlström & Daniel Sundberg, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 98-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68857 (URN)978-1-138-08749-1 (ISBN)978-1-315-11042-4 (ISBN)
Projects
Understanding Curriculum Reforms - A Theory Oriented Evaluation of the Swedish Curriculum Reform Lgr 11
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations

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