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Lindberg, Leif
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Lindberg, L. & Moqvist-Lindberg, I. (2018). Forskarutbildning - vart är den på väg?. In: Joakim Krantz & Daniel Sundberg (Ed.), Att leda lärande: En vänbok till Per Gerrevall (pp. 17-40). Kalmar, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forskarutbildning - vart är den på väg?
2018 (Swedish)In: Att leda lärande: En vänbok till Per Gerrevall / [ed] Joakim Krantz & Daniel Sundberg, Kalmar, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2018, p. 17-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kalmar, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79464 (URN)978-91-88761-70-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Brodin, E., Silander, C., Lindberg, L., Frick, L. & McKenna, S. (2018). Innovation, collaboration, and gender in national policies and guidelines on doctoral education: Shapes from Sweden and South Africa in the 21st century. In: : . Paper presented at Forskning om Högre Utbildning,15-16 May, 2018, Lund.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovation, collaboration, and gender in national policies and guidelines on doctoral education: Shapes from Sweden and South Africa in the 21st century
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In 2011, the European Research Area (ERA) outlined several principles of innovative doctoral training such as research excellence; exposure to industry and other relevant employment sectors; transferable skills training; and quality assurance (Vittorio 2015). Similar policies and guidelines can also be found in doctoral education across the globe, where the request for innovation and societal collaboration is urgent (e.g. Association of American Universities 1998/2017; Australian Council of Learned Academies 2016; HEQSF 2013; Swedish Government Bill, 2008, 2009, 2016). At the same time, it is known that the general conditions for innovation vary across countries (Meeus & Edquist 2006), and that global policy trends are construed and organised differently at national level in doctoral education (Andres et al. 2015). Combined with the fact that gender differences have been found in many studies on doctoral education in general (Jones 2013), it is significant to ask: What are the contextual and gendered conditions for doctoral students to develop their innovative and collaborative capability?

 

In our first approach to this problem field, we will present preliminary results from our analysis of some conditions at macro level in Sweden and South Africa. From a comparative perspective, we will elucidate how expressions of innovation, societal collaboration, gender and related concepts have occurred and converged in their national policies and guidelines on doctoral education in the 21st century. We will use summative content analysis for analysing data, which implies an interpretative process of “identifying and quantifying certain words or content in a text with the purpose of understanding the contextual use of the words or content” (Hsieh & Shannon 2005, p. 1283).

 

Comparing Swedish and South African doctoral education is well justified. Doctoral education is highlighted as a means to increased innovation and collaboration with society in the national policies of both countries. However, they also differ in their organisation of doctoral education, and their societal needs (e.g. for the South African context, see: National Planning Commission 2011). We assume that these differences should reflect nationally diverse ways to conceptualise innovation, societal collaboration, gender and related concepts in policy documents on doctoral education. Also, such a comparative perspective enables deeper understanding of the contextual conditions in Swedish doctoral education.

 

For the purpose of this conference, we will delimit our literature review to Swedish studies on doctoral education. While such studies are generally rare (Elmgren et al. 2015), they are almost non-existent in relation to innovation and collaboration. Some of these studies are rather focused on research policies and institutional conditions in general (Langfeldt et al. 2015; Stensaker & Benner 2013), than on doctoral education per se. Others are more concerned with doctoral students’ conditions for societal collaboration in practice (Andræ Thelin 2009; Bienowska & Klofsten 2012; Heldal 2016; Lundqvist & Benner 2012; Bienkowska, Klofsten and Rasmussen 2016; Wallgren 2007). However, when it comes to studies on innovation, there is dearth in the research literature. But we do know that doctoral students’ creativity is not always encouraged (Brodin 2015, 2016, 2017), and that other scholars have expressed similar concerns (Wingren 2015). Such results matters, as meta-analyses show a strong correlation between individuals’ creativity and innovation and also that contextual factors influence their innovative output (Sarooghi, Libaers & Burkemper 2015). We also know that concepts such as independence, critical thinking, and communication skills are frequently associated with innovation and collaboration (Cobo 2013). Thus our will include such related concepts in our analysis.  

 

This conference contribution aims at distributing our study to a Swedish audience, while the same results will be presented at the international Quality in Postgraduate Research conference (QPR) in Adelaide, 17-19 April 2018.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74580 (URN)
Conference
Forskning om Högre Utbildning,15-16 May, 2018, Lund
Available from: 2018-05-27 Created: 2018-05-27 Last updated: 2019-10-02Bibliographically approved
Brodin, E., Silander, C., Lindberg, L., Frick, L. & McKenna, S. (2018). Issues on innovation, societal collaboration, and gender in doctoral education: Their historical appearances and relationships in Sweden and South Africa. In: : . Paper presented at Quality in Postgraduate Research (QPR), Adelaide, April 17-19, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Issues on innovation, societal collaboration, and gender in doctoral education: Their historical appearances and relationships in Sweden and South Africa
Show others...
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In 2011, the European Research Area (ERA) outlined several principles of innovative doctoral training such as research excellence; exposure to industry and other relevant employment sectors; transferable skills training; and quality assurance (Vittorio, 2015). Similar policies and guidelines can also be found in doctoral education across the globe, where the request for innovation and societal collaboration is urgent (e.g. Association of American Universities, 1998/2017; Australian Council of Learned Academies, 2016; HEQSF, 2013; Swedish Government Bill, 2008, 2016). At the same time, it is known that the general conditions for innovation vary across countries (Meeus & Edquist, 2006), and that global policy trends are construed and organised differently at national level in doctoral education (Andres et al., 2015). Furthermore, studies have shown that doctoral students’ inter-sectorial work could be hindered by the fact that the universities are not always near to knowledge-intensive industries, or that the industry is ill prepared to make use of the doctoral students’ qualifications (Vittorio, 2015). Combined with the fact that gender differences have been found in a number studies on doctoral education in general (Jones, 2013), it is accordingly significant to ask: What are the contextual and gendered conditions for doctoral students to develop their innovative and collaborative capability? Current research has no satisfying answer to this complex question yet. Against this background, our conference contribution is founded in a newly started project entitled "Developing innovative and collaborative capability in doctoral education from a gender perspective: Conditions, processes and outcomes in Sweden and South Africa". Based on social rule theory (Burns & Carson, 2002), we assume that learning practices are governed by a range of social rules founded in policies, organisational leadership, scholarly norms, and societal stakeholders. In particular, we are interested in how diverse levels of the doctoral educational system are related (or not) to each other, and how different systems affect the students’ innovative and collaborative development. While our overall project consists of several self-contained but interrelated studies to fulfil this holistic and systems theoretical approach, the first part of our study, reported on here, focuses on the macro level only by analysing national policies and guidelines related to doctoral education. Hence, based on summative content analysis (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005), this conference contribution will illuminate how the expressions of innovation, societal collaboration, gender and related concepts have occurred, converged and developed over time in Swedish and South African national policies on doctoral education from 1970-2017. Certain attention will be given to differences and similarities in these regards when comparing the two nations. Comparing Swedish and South African doctoral education is well justified. In contrast to Sweden, with its long traditions of societal welfare and of producing doctorates, South Africa is now in a phase of significant expansion and construction of doctoral education – with the political aim to strengthen the economy and democracy of their nation (National Planning Commission, 2011). Due to these national differences, our project can contribute to a deeper understanding of both context-specific and global issues within the problem field.

Keywords
doctoral education; national policies; innovation; societal collaboration; gender
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73143 (URN)
Conference
Quality in Postgraduate Research (QPR), Adelaide, April 17-19, 2018
Available from: 2018-04-21 Created: 2018-04-21 Last updated: 2019-10-02Bibliographically approved
Silander, C., Riis, U. & Lindberg, L. (2017). Nordic research on gendered academic careers – a literature review. In: : . Paper presented at European Conference for Educational research (ECER), August 2017, Copenhagen.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nordic research on gendered academic careers – a literature review
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74584 (URN)
Conference
European Conference for Educational research (ECER), August 2017, Copenhagen
Available from: 2018-05-27 Created: 2018-05-27 Last updated: 2019-10-02Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, L. (2015). Ethos och skolframgång (2:1ed.). In: Jonas Höög & Olof Johansson (Ed.), Struktur, kultur, ledarskap: förutsättningar för framgångsrika skolor (pp. 51-71). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethos och skolframgång
2015 (Swedish)In: Struktur, kultur, ledarskap: förutsättningar för framgångsrika skolor / [ed] Jonas Höög & Olof Johansson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 2:1, p. 51-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015 Edition: 2:1
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Pedagogics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50175 (URN)978-91-44-10288-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2016-03-08Bibliographically approved
Silander, C., Haake, U. & Lindberg, L. (2014). Intern organisation och styrning av forskningens profilering och finansiering: En studie av svenska högskolor och nya universitet. Slutrapport till KK-stiftelsen 2014-03-14. Stockholm: KK-stiftelsen
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intern organisation och styrning av forskningens profilering och finansiering: En studie av svenska högskolor och nya universitet. Slutrapport till KK-stiftelsen 2014-03-14
2014 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KK-stiftelsen, 2014. p. 63
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences; Social Sciences, Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37645 (URN)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2014-10-13 Created: 2014-10-13 Last updated: 2015-10-13Bibliographically approved
Silander, C., Haake, U. & Lindberg, L. (2013). The different worlds of academia: a horizontal analysis of gender equality in Swedish higher education. Higher Education, 66(2), 173-188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The different worlds of academia: a horizontal analysis of gender equality in Swedish higher education
2013 (English)In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 173-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Women are underrepresented in advanced positions in higher education in Europe. This study takes a horizontal perspective and focuses on the relationship between gender and discipline in order to combine research on gender in higher education with theories of disciplinary differences in academic cultures. The study points out substantial differences between disciplines in gender composition, specifically, the probability of a person leaving academia after earning a doctor’s degree and various attitudes towards gender equality work. Our approach, which is based on quantitative longitudinal as well as qualitative research methods, has yielded a more complex and contradictory picture of gender equality in higher education than have vertical cross-sectional studies.

Keywords
Gender equality Horizontal analysis Academia Higher education
National Category
Gender Studies Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Pedagogics; Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-23305 (URN)10.1007/s10734-012-9597-1 (DOI)000321918400003 ()2-s2.0-84880604818 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2013-01-07 Created: 2013-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, L., Riis, U. & Silander, C. (2011). Gender Equality in Swedish Higher Education: Patterns and Shifts. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 55(2), 165-179
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender Equality in Swedish Higher Education: Patterns and Shifts
2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 165-179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In most European countries, more women than men attend undergraduate Higher Education (HE) and more women than men obtain degrees. In Sweden the proportion of female students has long been in the vicinity of 51-60%. The number of doctoral entrants and degrees meet a obalanced gender criterion,o defined as no sex constituting more than 60% of the population. Still the unequal gender structure of higher positions persists: men tend to hold the top positions, especially as professors. Explaining this inertia is the main theme of this article. Differences between horizontal and vertical analyses are focused on, and changes due to gender balance during 1999-2007 are shown. Variations in career patterns over research areas are highlighted. Finally, hypotheses are formulated and approaches for further studies on gender balance in HE are discussed.

Keywords
academic career, equality in education, higher education, discrimination
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Pedagogics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-10088 (URN)10.1080/00313831.2011.554697 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-01-17 Created: 2011-01-17 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, L. (2010). Ethos och skolframgång (1:1ed.). In: Jonas Höög & Olof Johansson (Ed.), Struktur, kultur, ledarskap - förutsättningar för framgångsrika skolor: (pp. 53-73). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethos och skolframgång
2010 (Swedish)In: Struktur, kultur, ledarskap - förutsättningar för framgångsrika skolor / [ed] Jonas Höög & Olof Johansson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2010, 1:1, p. 53-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2010 Edition: 1:1
Keywords
Ethos, skolframgång, ledarskap
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-10087 (URN)978-91-44-06754-4 (ISBN)
Projects
Struktur, kultur, ledarskap - förutsättningar för framgångsrika skolor
Available from: 2011-01-17 Created: 2011-01-17 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Silander, C., Riis, U., Lindberg, L. & Haake, U. (2009). Gender Equality and the Academy: Facts or False Assuptions?. In: ECER 2009, Vienna September 28-30: Theory and Evidence in European Educational Research: .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender Equality and the Academy: Facts or False Assuptions?
2009 (English)In: ECER 2009, Vienna September 28-30: Theory and Evidence in European Educational Research, 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-7269 (URN)
Available from: 2010-02-23 Created: 2010-02-23 Last updated: 2016-11-14Bibliographically approved
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