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Nicklasson, Linda
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Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Lindersson, L., Guntell, L., Carlsson, R. & Agerström, J. (2019). Reassessing the impact of descriptive norms on charitable giving. International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing, 24(1), 1-6, Article ID e1617.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reassessing the impact of descriptive norms on charitable giving
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing, ISSN 1465-4520, E-ISSN 1479-103X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-6, article id e1617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The usefulness of conveying descriptive norms (“this is what most people do”) for prosocial purposes such as environmental conservation and charitable giving has recently been called into question. Two experiments (N = 748) evaluated the hypothesis that descriptive norms increase people's intentions to donate to charity. Overall, the results supported this hypothesis. Another aim was to examine the robustness of the local norm superiority effect that proposes that the local norms of one's immediate environment are superior to other descriptive norms (global and social identity norms). This hypothesis was not supported. The results suggest that differences between different types of norms are likely to be small.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77848 (URN)10.1002/nvsm.1617 (DOI)000458529200001 ()2-s2.0-85061091090 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Agerström, J., Carlsson, R., Nicklasson, L. & Guntell, L. (2016). Using descriptive social norms to increase charitable giving: The power of local norms. Journal of Economic Psychology, 52, 147-153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using descriptive social norms to increase charitable giving: The power of local norms
2016 (English)In: Journal of Economic Psychology, ISSN 0167-4870, E-ISSN 1872-7719, Vol. 52, p. 147-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a field experiment, we examined whether conveying descriptive social norms (e.g., "this is what most people do") increases charitable giving. Additionally, we examined whether people are more likely to conform to the local norms of one's immediate environment than to more global norms extending beyond one's local environment. University students received a charity organization's information brochure and were asked for a monetary contribution. An experimentaldescriptive norm manipulation was embedded in the brochure. We found that providing people with descriptive norms increased charitable giving substantially compared with industry standard altruistic appeals (control condition). Moreover, conveying local norms were more effective in increasing charitable givingthan conveying global norms. Practical implications for charity organizations and marketing are proposed.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-48487 (URN)10.1016/j.joep.2015.12.007 (DOI)000370771000011 ()2-s2.0-84953294012 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-21 Created: 2015-12-21 Last updated: 2018-02-01Bibliographically approved
Agerström, J., Carlsson, R., Nicklasson, L. & Guntell, L. (2015). Descriptive social norms and charitable giving: the power of local norms. Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Descriptive social norms and charitable giving: the power of local norms
2015 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

By conducting a field experiment, we examined whether conveying descriptive social norms (e.g., “this is what most people do”) leads to more charitable giving compared to industry standard appeals. Moreover, we examined whether people are more likely to conform to the local norms of one’s immediate environment than to more global norms extending beyond one’s local environment. University students received a charity organization’s information brochure and were asked for a monetary contribution. An experimental descriptive norm manipulation was embedded in the brochure. We found that providing people with descriptive norms increased charitable giving substantially compared with industry standard altruistic appeals (control condition). Moreover, conveying local norms were more effective in increasing charitable giving than conveying global norms. Practical implications for charity organizations and marketing are proposed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies, 2015. p. 19
Series
Working paper series: Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies ; 2015:10
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50620 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
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