lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Runeson, Ingrid
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Johansson, M., Wåhlin, I., Magnusson, L., Runeson, I. & Hanson, E. (2018). Family members' experiences with intensive care unit diaries when the patient does not survive. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 32(1), 233-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family members' experiences with intensive care unit diaries when the patient does not survive
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to explore how family members experienced the use of a diary when a relative does not survive the stay in the intensive care unit (ICU).

METHOD: A qualitative method with a hermeneutic approach was used. Nine participants who read/wrote eight diaries in total were interviewed. The collected data were analysed using a hermeneutic technique inspired by Geanellos.

FINDINGS: The analysis revealed an overall theme 'the diary was experienced as a bridge connecting the past with the future', which was a metaphor referring to the temporal aspect where there was the period with the diary up until the patient's death and then the postbereavement period. The diary contributed to both a rational and emotional understanding of the death of the patient and disclosed glimmers of light that still existed before the illness deteriorated. Further, the diary bridged the space between family members themselves and between family and nursing staff. It helped to maintain a feeling of togetherness and engagement in the care of the patient which family members found comforting.

CONCLUSION: Family members of nonsurvivors had a need to have the ICU time explained and expressed. The diary might work as a form of 'survival kit' to gain coherence and understanding; to meet their needs during the hospital stay; and, finally, to act as a bereavement support by processing the death of the patient.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Gadamer, Diaries, Experiences, Family members, Hermeneutics, Intensive care unit, Relatives
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68205 (URN)10.1111/scs.12454 (DOI)000426524200023 ()28524380 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042564022 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-04 Created: 2017-10-04 Last updated: 2019-09-07Bibliographically approved
Johansson, M., Hanson, E., Runeson, I. & Wåhlin, I. (2015). Family members’ experiences of keeping a diary during a sick relative’s stay in the intensive care unit: A hermeneutic interview study. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 31(4), 241-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family members’ experiences of keeping a diary during a sick relative’s stay in the intensive care unit: A hermeneutic interview study
2015 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 241-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

The aim of the study was to explore family members’ experiences with keeping a diary during a sick relative's stay in the ICU.

Design

A qualitative method with a hermeneutic approach was used. Eleven participants, who recorded nine diaries in total, were interviewed. The collected data were analysed using a hermeneutic approach inspired by Gadamer.

Results

The analysis revealed a meta-theme: ‘it [writing in the diary] felt like contact’ which was created by a feeling of togetherness and the opportunity to communicate with the patient. Keeping a diary likely meets the needs of family members in several ways because it becomes a way to be present at the patient's bedsides, to provide caregiving, to maintain hope and to relay cogent information. However, concerns regarding negative aspects of diary keeping were also raised; for example, the diary created feelings of stress, guilt and failure and exposed intimate details.

Conclusion

The diary symbolised the maintenance of relationships with the patients and was a substitute for the usual opportunities for communication. Furthermore, it was instrumental in meeting the needs of the majority of family members in several ways. Nevertheless, the diary did have negative effects for certain individuals, which highlights the importance of an individualised approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Diaries, Experiences, Gadamer, Hermeneutics, ICU, Relatives
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-40856 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2014.11.002 (DOI)000361146200007 ()2-s2.0-84939262305 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2019-09-07Bibliographically approved
Runeson, I., Proczkowska-Björklund, M. & Idvall, E. (2010). Ethical dilemmas before and during narcosis induction of young children as told by nurse anaesthetists. Journal of Child Health Care, 14(4), 345-354
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethical dilemmas before and during narcosis induction of young children as told by nurse anaesthetists
2010 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 345-354Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on physicians’, nurses’ and enrolled nurses’ experiences of ethical dilemmas have been conducted in many healthcare fields. The aim of this study was to elucidate ethical dilemmas before and during the induction of anaesthesia of children aged three to six years as described by nurse anaesthetists (NAs). Two group interviews with NAs were conducted where they were asked to describe ethically problematic situations. Three situations were chosen from a total of 15: administration of anaesthesia to an already sleeping child, lack of information given to a child, and a child is anaesthetized against his/her will. Conceivable and reasonable alternative options were identified and consequences of the different actions were presented. Finally the conflicts of value were discussed and commented on. The cases describe when a child’s rights are given less weight and the child has little opportunity to participate in the decision making. However, parents and NAs acted in the best interest of the child. Analysing and reflecting on situations involving ethical dilemmas would enhance NAs critical thinking and guide NAs in their decision making when providing anaesthesia care.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences; Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-9777 (URN)10.1177/1367493510379610 (DOI)2-s2.0-79952261615 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-01-17 Created: 2010-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Mårtenson, E., Fägerskiöld, A., Runeson, I. & Berterö, C. (2009). The Ethical Demand in Nursing: A Scandinavian Perspective. Nursing Science Quarterly, 22(3), 281-288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Ethical Demand in Nursing: A Scandinavian Perspective
2009 (English)In: Nursing Science Quarterly, ISSN 0894-3184, E-ISSN 1552-7409, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 281-288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this column the authors discuss the ethics of information exchange in nursing practice with children. Five concepts identified in three Swedish grounded theory studies and a content analysis that used the theoretical framework of ethical demand were analyzed. A simultaneous concept analysis found five related concepts: being interconnected, acting according to accepted procedure, completeness, interdependence, and social intercourse. These concepts are synthesized in the concept of intergrade, which emphasizes the value of maintaining the integrity of all involved in information exchange.

Keywords
Ethical demand, Information exchange, Nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hik:diva-2899 (URN)10.1177/0894318409338681 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-01-19 Created: 2010-02-28 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Beck, I., Runeson, I. & Blomqvist, K. (2009). To find inner peace: soft massage as an estabished and integrated part of palliative care. International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 15(11), 541-545
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To find inner peace: soft massage as an estabished and integrated part of palliative care
2009 (English)In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 541-545Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-9779 (URN)
Available from: 2011-01-19 Created: 2010-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Proczkowska Björklund, M., Runeson, I., Gustafsson, P. A. & Svedin, C. G. (2008). Communication and child behaviour associated with unwillingness to take premedication. Acta Paediatrica, 97(9), 1238-1242
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication and child behaviour associated with unwillingness to take premedication
2008 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 97, no 9, p. 1238-1242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-2099 (URN)
Available from: 2010-04-06 Created: 2010-04-06 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Proczkowska Björklund, M., Runeson, I., Gustafsson, P. A. & Svedin, C. G. (2008). Decision making about pre-medication to children. Child Care Health and Development, 34(6), 713-720
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision making about pre-medication to children
2008 (English)In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 713-720Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Inviting the child to participate in medical decisions regarding common medical procedures might influence the child's behaviour during the procedures. We wanted to study nurse decision-making communication regarding pre-medication before ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgery.

Method In total, 102 children (3–6 years) signed for ENT surgery were video-filmed during the pre-medication process. The nurse decision-making communication was identified, transcribed and grouped in six main categories dependent on the level of participation (self-determination, compromise, negotiation, questioning, information, lack of communication). Associations between child factors (age, gender, verbal communication and non-verbal communication) and different nurse decision-making communication were studied. Associations between the decision-making communication and verbal hesitation and/or the child's compliance in taking pre-medication were also studied.

Results Totally, information was the most frequently used category of decision making communication followed by negotiation and questioning. To the children showing signs of shyness, the nurse used more negotiation, questions and self-determination communication and less information. The nurse used more compromise, negotiation and gave less information to children with less compliance. No specific type of nurse decision-making communication was associated with verbal hesitation. The most important predictors for verbal hesitation were none or hesitant eye contact with nurse (OR = 4.5) and placement nearby or in parent's lap (OR = 4.7). Predictors for less compliance in taking pre-medication were verbal hesitation from the child (OR = 22.7) and children who did not give any verbal answer to nurse initial questions (OR = 5.5).

Conclusion Decision-making communication could not predict the child's compliance during pre-medication. Although negotiation, questioning and self-determination communication were associated with more unwillingness to take pre-medication. More knowledge is needed about communication to children in medical settings and how it influences the child's behaviours.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-1927 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2214.2008.00853.x (DOI)
Available from: 2010-04-06 Created: 2010-04-06 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Runeson, I., Mårtensson, E. & Enskär, K. (2007). Children's knowledge and degree of participation in decision making when undergoing a clinical diagnostic procedure. Pediatric Nursing, 33(6), 505-511
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's knowledge and degree of participation in decision making when undergoing a clinical diagnostic procedure
2007 (English)In: Pediatric Nursing, ISSN 0097-9805, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 505-511Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-1564 (URN)
Available from: 2010-04-06 Created: 2010-04-06 Last updated: 2011-10-10Bibliographically approved
Runeson, I. & Idvall, E. (2004). Pain experiences and non-pharmacological strategies for pain management after tosillectomy; a qualitative interview study of children and parents. Journal of Child Health Care
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pain experiences and non-pharmacological strategies for pain management after tosillectomy; a qualitative interview study of children and parents
2004 (English)In: Journal of Child Health CareArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-409 (URN)
Available from: 2010-03-31 Created: 2010-03-31 Last updated: 2011-09-20Bibliographically approved
Runeson, I. (2002). An observational study of the level at which parents participate in decisions during their child’s hospitalization. Nursing Ethics, 9(2):202-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An observational study of the level at which parents participate in decisions during their child’s hospitalization
2002 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, Vol. 9(2):202-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-405 (URN)
Available from: 2010-03-31 Created: 2010-03-31 Last updated: 2011-09-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications