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Andersen, J. A. (2013). Leadership research: Where irrelevance prevails. Dynamic relationships management journal, 2(2), 3-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leadership research: Where irrelevance prevails
2013 (English)In: Dynamic relationships management journal, ISSN 2232-5867, E-ISSN 2350-367X, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Is contemporary managerial leadership research relevant and helpful to managers? Arguably, managers’ main task and prime concern is to contribute to the attainment of organisational goals, i.e., to enhance organizational effectiveness. On the basis of this premise of relevance, a survey of 105 research articles published in two international journals year 2011 reveals that researchers did not address this question. In these articles the term ‘effectiveness’ occurred about one time for every 1000 words. In the 105 articles effectiveness was seldom defined and never measured. If managers‘ prime concern is to contribute to organizational effectiveness, then there is no surprise that several scholars have found that managers regard leadership research irrelevant and useless.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ljubljana, Slovenien: , 2013
Keywords
Leadership
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation; Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-36998 (URN)10.17708/DRMJ.2013.v02n02a01 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-09-12 Created: 2014-09-12 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Andersen, J. A. (2012). Public Managers: Their behavior, their change potential and the behavior of women and men in public organizations.. Uprava / Administration, 10(3), 25-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public Managers: Their behavior, their change potential and the behavior of women and men in public organizations.
2012 (English)In: Uprava / Administration, ISSN 1581-7555, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 25-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This survey article addresses three questions based on the assumption that significant differences exist between public and private organizations. If this assumption is correct managerial and leadership behavior will differ between public and private managers. Additionally, the propensity to change will also differ between public and private managers. Since a number of studies indicate that managers’ leadership behavior in public organizations differ from that of private managers, difference and similarities in leadership behavior between women and men in public organizations are examined. Three studies are presented here which show that public and private managers have different behavioral patterns of leadership. However, public managers turn out to be more change-oriented than business managers. In the public organizations investigated no differences in leadership behavior between women and men were found.

National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-22226 (URN)
Available from: 2012-10-29 Created: 2012-10-29 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Andersen, J. A. (2012). Reintroducing the Owner: On Corporate Governance, Goals, Organisation and Leadership Theories. In: Politis, J (Ed.), Politis, J (Ed.), PROCEEDINGS OF THE 8TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE: . Paper presented at 8th European Conference on Management Leadership and Governance (ECMLG) Location: Neapolis Univ Pafos, Pafos, CYPRUS, NOV 08-09, 2012 (pp. 1-7). NR READING: Academic Conferences Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reintroducing the Owner: On Corporate Governance, Goals, Organisation and Leadership Theories
2012 (English)In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 8TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE / [ed] Politis, J, NR READING: Academic Conferences Limited , 2012, p. 1-7Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This article illustrates that contemporary literature on organisation and leadership attributes little attention to the topic of corporate governance. Textbooks on organisation and leadership theory yield no or few listings of corporate governance and owner (ownership). This paper does not deal with corporate governance and the agency theory as such, but rather the way in which these theories are linked to organisation and leadership theory. Additionally, several incidents from business and private organisations have shown the problems and dramatic consequences of inadequate corporate governance, which in itself call for more research on this topic. The main reason why corporate governance has been marginalised in the literature appears to be the prevalence of the open system theory, in which ownership and organisational goals are not essential theoretical concepts. According to this theory the owners are but one of many stakeholders. Some scholars even claim that organisations do not have any owners. Moreover, the organisational goals are not the goals of the owners, but the goals of the stakeholders or goals of the managers. In order to promote corporate governance a sound theoretical foundation is called for. The rationalistic organisation theory constitutes a sound theoretical foundation for the principal agency theory and thus for the study of corporate governance. In the rationalistic theory the owners and their goals are given as the reason for the establishment of an organisation. The chief execute officer is hired to run the organisation on behalf of the owners in order to achieve organisational goals as decided by the owners. The principal and agency theory is based on the rationalistic organisation theory in which owners play a central role in the formulation of goals and establishing as well as controlling the organisation and its managers. Both corporate governance and agency theory need to regain a dominant place in organisation theory textbooks and in organisation, management, and leadership research. In present-day literature on organisation, management and leadership theories - based on the open system theory - the owner has disappeared. The time has come to reinstate the owner.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NR READING: Academic Conferences Limited, 2012
Keywords
corporate governance, owners, ownership, goals, organisation theories, leadership theories
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-28374 (URN)000321614900001 ()978-1-908272-76-8 (ISBN)
Conference
8th European Conference on Management Leadership and Governance (ECMLG) Location: Neapolis Univ Pafos, Pafos, CYPRUS, NOV 08-09, 2012
Available from: 2013-08-22 Created: 2013-08-22 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Andersen, J. A. (2012). Seven pitfalls in organisation literature. Dynamic relationships management journal, 1(1), 48-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seven pitfalls in organisation literature
2012 (English)In: Dynamic relationships management journal, ISSN 2232-5867, E-ISSN 2350-367X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 48-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current organisation literature is rife with several incorrect and confusing assertions which continually create problems for students and researchers alike. Seven of these unfortunate beliefs are presented here and provocatively called ‘pitfalls’. The aim of this article is to draw attention to some of these theoretically incorrect assertions and how they can be avoided in scholarly work. The implications for managers are also presented.

Keywords
goals, anthropomorphism, organisational member, flat organisations, hierarchy and bureaucracy, effective leaders
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-22225 (URN)10.17708/DRMJ.2012.v01n01a03 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-10-29 Created: 2012-10-29 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Andersen, J. A. & Kovac, J. (2012). Why European subordinates trust their managers. Organizacija, 45(6), 300-309
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why European subordinates trust their managers
2012 (English)In: Organizacija, ISSN 1318-5454, E-ISSN 1581-1832, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 300-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article addresses the problem of why subordinates trust their managers based on the responses from 108 subordinatesof seven Slovenian managers and from 138 subordinates of eight Swedish managers. The subordinates of these managersresponded to a 20-item instrument tested for reliability and validity. In both samples the managers enjoyed different degreesof trust. The level of trust vested in Slovenian managers was higher than in Swedish ones. The kinds of managers’ actions thatenhanced trust were similar amongst Swedish and Slovenian subordinates. Different socio-cultural contexts may theoreticallyexplain why some other kinds of actions had contrasting effects between the samples. On the whole, the actions of managersexplain trust in both countries. Subordinates’ trust in managers declines with the increasing hierarchical distance in bothnational samples. Managers need to show in action that they trust their subordinates, promote their interests, demonstrateappreciation of their subordinates, and solve problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kranj, Slovenia: , 2012
Keywords
Trust, managers, subordinates, societal factors, hierachy
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-22866 (URN)10.2478/v10051-012-0029-x (DOI)
Available from: 2012-12-13 Created: 2012-12-13 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Andersen, J. A. (2011). A new sports manager does not make a better team.. International journal of sports science & coaching, 6(1), 167-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new sports manager does not make a better team.
2011 (English)In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 167-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article surveys the literature on the impact of managerial successions on team performance in professional sports and assesses ten studies on the effect of managerial succession. They cover 80 years (1920-2000) with data from four different sports and two countries. From these studies, three lessons emerge when teams perform poorly: (i) a change of coach or manager during the season is not helpful; (ii) if succession is deemed necessary, change the manager between seasons; and (iii) if the choice is between a manager from inside the organization and one from the outside, choose the former. What is critical is that whichever manager is replaced or for whatever reason, the performance of the team will most likely not improve for that reason alone. In short, a new manager does not make a better team.

National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-22222 (URN)10.1260/1747-9541.6.1.167 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-10-29 Created: 2012-10-29 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Andersen, J. A. & Hansson, P. (2011). At the end of the road?: On differences between women and men in leadership behavior. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 32(5), 328-341
Open this publication in new window or tab >>At the end of the road?: On differences between women and men in leadership behavior
2011 (English)In: Leadership & Organization Development Journal, ISSN 0143-7739, E-ISSN 1472-5347, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 328-341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – This study aims to explore behavioural differences between women and men in managerial positions and suggest explanations for differences and similarities.

Design/methodology/approach – In order to eliminate any effects of organizational differences on leadership behaviour, this study had public managers responding to questionnaires that measured their leadership style, decision-making style, and motivation profile.

Findings – Statistical analyses of data from three groups of Swedish public managers (n=385) revealed virtually no significant differences in behaviour between female and male managers. Regardless of whether there is a female or male majority of employees or a female or male majority of managers, no effect on leadership behaviour occurs.

Originality/value – A number of studies indicate that managers' behaviour is different in different types of organizations. This study suggests, therefore, that, independent of gender, organizational and demographic characteristics modify leadership behaviours, thus explaining similarities in leadership behaviour.

National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-22223 (URN)10.1108/01437731111146550 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-10-29 Created: 2012-10-29 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Smith, P. B., Peterson, M. F., Thomason, S. J. & Andersen, J. A. (2011). National Culture as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Managers' Use of Guidance Sources and How Well Work Events Are Handled. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 42(6), 1101-1121
Open this publication in new window or tab >>National Culture as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Managers' Use of Guidance Sources and How Well Work Events Are Handled
2011 (English)In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, ISSN 0022-0221, E-ISSN 1552-5422, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 1101-1121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Managerial leadership within 56 nations is examined in terms of the sources of guidance that managers use to handle work events. Correlations between the sources of guidance that managers use and the perceived effectiveness of how well these events are handled are employed to represent their schemas and attributional propensities for effectiveness. These correlations are predicted to vary in relation to dimensions of national culture. The hypotheses are tested using data from 7,701 managers. Reliance on one's own experience and training, on formal rules and procedures, and on one's subordinates are positively correlated with perceived effectiveness globally, whereas reliance on superiors, colleagues, and unwritten rules are negatively correlated with perceived effectiveness. Cross-level analyses revealed support for hypotheses specifying the ways in which each of these correlations is moderated by one or more of the dimensions of national culture first identified by Hofstede (1980). These results provide an advance on prior analyses that have tested only for main effect relationships between managerial leadership and national culture.

Keywords
National Culture, Guidance Sources, Managers, Effectiveness
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-22377 (URN)10.1177/0022022110381427 (DOI)000292764900013 ()
Note

The Event Management Research Meaning Group* 1School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, United Kingdom 2Department of Management Programs, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, United States of America 3Department of Organization and Strategy, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands 4Department of Management, University of Tampa, Tampa, Florida, United States of America *Mustafa Achoui, Abd Halim Ahmad, Debo Akande, Norm Althouse, Jon Aarum Andersen, Nicholas Athanassiou, Sabino Ayestaran, Massimo Bellotto, Stephen Bochner, Victor Callan, Valeria Cavalcante, Nam Guk Cho, Isabela Curado, Gudrun Curri, Reka Czegledi, Maria Alice D’Amorim, Carlos Davila, Bjorn Ekelund, Pierre-Henri François, Eduardo Gamas, Margarita Garcia, Gert Graversen, Beata Groblewska, Michael Hadani, Daniela Halasova, Charles Harb, K. Hoffman, Jorge Jesuino, Aristotle Kantas, Lyudmila Karamushka, Rob Konopaske, Paul Koopman, Pavla Kruzela, Ersin Kusdil, Tomas Lenartowicz, Kwok Leung, Tock Keng Lim, Sigmar Malvezzi, Mark Meckler, Andrew Mogaji, Shahrenaz Mortazavi, John Munene, Yaotian Pan, Ken Parry, T. K. Peng, Dana Pop, Betty Jane Punnett, Mark Radford, Arja Ropo, Julie Rowney, Sunita Sadhwani, Jose Saiz, Grant Savage, T. N. Sinha, Ritch Sorenson, Elizabeth Steinbeis, Erna Szabo, Yumiko Taylor, Punyacha Teparakul, Aqeel Tirmizi, Sevda Tsvetanova, Martin Udwin, Conrad Viedge, Carolyn Wall, Zhongming Wang, Vladimir Yanchuk, and Irina Zinovieva Peter B. Smith, School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, United Kingdom. Email: psmith@sussex.ac.uk Abstract

Available from: 2012-11-08 Created: 2012-11-08 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Andersen, J. A. (2010). Assessing Public Managers’ Change-Oriented Behavior: Are Private Managers Caught in the Doldrums?. International Journal of Public Administration, 33(6), 335-345
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing Public Managers’ Change-Oriented Behavior: Are Private Managers Caught in the Doldrums?
2010 (English)In: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 335-345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-22221 (URN)10.1080/01900690903584313 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-10-29 Created: 2012-10-29 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Andersen, J. A. (2010). Public vs. private managers.: How public and private managers differ in leadership behavior.. PAR. Public Administration Review, 70(1), 131-141
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public vs. private managers.: How public and private managers differ in leadership behavior.
2010 (English)In: PAR. Public Administration Review, ISSN 0033-3352, E-ISSN 1540-6210, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 131-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article aims to find out whether there are behavioral differences between public and private sector managers. Two groups of public managers (managers of social insurance agencies and public school principals) and a group of private managers (two samples) are investigated. Behavioral dimensions are investigated including leadership style (task, relationship, and change orientation), decision-making style (the functions of sensing, intuition, thinking, and feeling), and motivation profile (achievement, affiliation, and power motivation). An analysis of data from 459 managers in four organizations in Sweden reveal significant differences in behavior between public and private managers. However, no significant differences in leadership behavior are discovered among public managers. Possible explanations for such differences and similarities are explored.

National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-22220 (URN)10.1111/j.1540-6210.2009.02117.x (DOI)2-s2.0-73849111315 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-10-29 Created: 2012-10-29 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2156-680x

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