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Kobiałka, Dawid
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Kobiałka, D. (2014). Between what is presented and how is presented: historical re-enactment through popular culture. Playthepast
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Between what is presented and how is presented: historical re-enactment through popular culture
2014 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

The abundance of the references to the past in the present causes some theoretical problems. In other words, usually analysing different manifestations of the past in e.g. computers games, Hollywood films and so on to much attention is paid only on content (what is presented). Formal aspects of each film, computer game and so on are omitted. I want to explore this problem a little bit in this short text by taking as an example a historical re-enactment movement of the Viking Age.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Playthepast, 2014
Keywords
Historical re-enactment, Material culture, Popular culture, Public archaeology, Material culture studies
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-31406 (URN)
Available from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2014-10-28Bibliographically approved
Frąckowiak, M., Kajda, K. & Kobiałka, D. (2014). Night of the living dead: modern ruins and archaeology. Archaeolog Blog
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Night of the living dead: modern ruins and archaeology
2014 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, pages
Archaeolog Blog, 2014
Keywords
Archaeology of the contemporary past, Ruins, Popular culture, Materiality
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-31986 (URN)
Available from: 2014-02-05 Created: 2014-02-05 Last updated: 2014-10-28Bibliographically approved
Kobiałka, D. (2014). Star Trek into Archaeology: Captain James T. Kirk and Heritage from the Future. Then Dig Blog
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Star Trek into Archaeology: Captain James T. Kirk and Heritage from the Future
2014 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Definitely, it was not a good day for Theodor Adorno (2005: 25), otherwise great German philosopher, when he honestly admitted in Minima Moralia: ‘Every visit to the cinema leaves me, against all my vigilance, stupider and worse’. What Adorno despised was not only Hollywood movies, but generally, popular culture per se that was part of culture industry. However, it can be said that today there are many interesting things taking place in cinema that can inspire archaeologists. One of them concerns heritage; the subject that is very close to our hearts.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Then Dig Blog, 2014
Keywords
heritage, popular culture, future
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-31654 (URN)
Available from: 2014-01-24 Created: 2014-01-24 Last updated: 2015-12-11Bibliographically approved
Kobiałka, D. (2013). A world in decay?: a case of tram cemetery in Wrocław (Poland). Archaelog Blog
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A world in decay?: a case of tram cemetery in Wrocław (Poland)
2013 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

One of the many examples of material culture where materiality and memory are deeply interwoven is a certain tram cemetery in Wrocław (Poland). That is why I will shortly describe the history of the site, to focus later on interesting problems which confront us, such as heritage sites as tram and/or car cemeteries. I refer also to cinema, where issues often discussed by archaeologists, like ruins, material culture, heritage in becoming, etc. are staged in such a way that is worthy of closer attention

Place, publisher, year, pages
Archaelog Blog, 2013
Keywords
Material culture, Heritage, Trams, Popular culture, An archaeology of the recent times
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-30100 (URN)
Projects
Back to the past? The relations between tourism, past and culture heritage. The case of Poland and Sweden.
Note

This publication is part of my research work at Linnaeus University, thanks to a Swedish Institute scholarship. (2011-2012)

Available from: 2013-11-02 Created: 2013-11-02 Last updated: 2014-10-28Bibliographically approved
Kobiałka, D. (2013). Against Gandalf the Grey: an archaeology of the surface. Archaeolog Blog
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Against Gandalf the Grey: an archaeology of the surface
2013 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Archaeology has been for many years identified with its own method, that of excavation. It isthe way the public sees archaeology and many archaeologists think of themselves too (e.g.Holtorf 2007). However, Rodney Harrison recently pointed out the crucial role of the surfacein archaeological thinking (Harrison 2011, in press).

Place, publisher, year, pages
Archaeolog Blog, 2013
Keywords
Excavations, Surface investigations, Popular culture
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-31985 (URN)
Projects
Back to the past? The relations between tourism, past and culture heritage. The case of Poland and Sweden.
Note

Archaeolog has moved to a new platform on a new site.

http://www.stanford.edu/dept/archaeology/cgi-bin/archaeolog/

Available from: 2014-02-05 Created: 2014-02-05 Last updated: 2016-12-15Bibliographically approved
Kobiałka, D. (2013). An archaeology of Skyfall.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An archaeology of Skyfall
2013 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Archaeology as practiced by anthropologists is no longer only about prehistoric societies. As the world becomes increasingly preoccupied with preserving cultural heritage for future generations, archaeologists are increasingly shifting their attention from mummies and pottery to contemporary phenomena. Cultural heritage that is worth preserving could be almost anything: from Stonehenge, through to the pyramids in Egypt, to places where Star Wars or The Lord of the Rings were filmed. Even such places as the ruins of Nazi factories or Soviet war infrastructure are fragments of our history and can say something significant about our past. In fact, blockbuster films can be just as valid a topic for anthropological investigation.

Keywords
cultural heritage, popular culture, archaeology
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-28321 (URN)
Projects
Back to the past? The relations between tourism, past and culture heritage. The case of Poland and Sweden.
Available from: 2013-08-21 Created: 2013-08-21 Last updated: 2016-01-27Bibliographically approved
Kobiałka, D. (2013). Archaeology through the lens of Sherlock Holmes. Archaeolog Blog
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeology through the lens of Sherlock Holmes
2013 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

There is always something to learn from Sherlock Holmes. It is a good sign that an archaeologist has been often identified with the private detective.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Archaeolog Blog, 2013
Keywords
Sherlock Holmes, Excavations, Surface investigations, Popular culture
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-28322 (URN)
Projects
Back to the past? The relations between tourism, past and culture heritage. The case of Poland and Sweden.
Note

This publication is part of my research work at Linnaeus University, thanks to a Swedish Institute scholarship. (2011-2012)

Available from: 2013-08-21 Created: 2013-08-21 Last updated: 2014-10-28Bibliographically approved
Kobiałka, D. (2013). From excavation to archaeological X-Files (1ed.). In: Alfredo González Ruibal (Ed.), Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity (pp. 56-66). London - New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From excavation to archaeological X-Files
2013 (English)In: Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity / [ed] Alfredo González Ruibal, London - New York: Routledge, 2013, 1, p. 56-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London - New York: Routledge, 2013 Edition: 1
Series
Archaeological Orientations
Keywords
excavations, surface investigations, popular culture
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-28327 (URN)978-0-415-67392-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-08-21 Created: 2013-08-21 Last updated: 2016-11-24Bibliographically approved
Kobiałka, D. (2013). On (very) new and (extremely) critical archaeologies, or why one may remain forever eighteen years behind the truly new. Forum Kritische Archäologie, 2, 15-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On (very) new and (extremely) critical archaeologies, or why one may remain forever eighteen years behind the truly new
2013 (English)In: Forum Kritische Archäologie, ISSN 2194-346X, E-ISSN 2194-346X, Vol. 2, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contemporary archaeologies are complex and diverse. It is easier to find things that differentiateprehistoric archaeology, for example, (e.g. Childe 1929) from the archaeology of the contemporary past(Buchli and Lucas 2001) than to identify what both share. The same claim applies to a history ofarchaeology as such. To simplify, to indicate the differences between culture-historical archaeology,processual archaeology and post-processual archaeologies does not cause many problems (Trigger 2006).However, in this article I claim that these archaeologies use in a very same way the ideas of what ‘new’ and‘critique’ in archaeology are about. The thesis of this text is: there is usually not so much truly new in theideas that are described as new and innovative (Žižek 2008).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Freie Universität Berlin, 2013
Keywords
new archaeologies, critique, repetition
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-28328 (URN)10.6105/journal.fka.2013.2.2 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-08-21 Created: 2013-08-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Kobiałka, D. (2013). Popping tags: thrift shopping with Macklemore. PopAnth
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Popping tags: thrift shopping with Macklemore
2013 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

We live in a world–or so we’re told–in which we’re obsessed with the new. Shopping malls, glossy magazines, and catwalk parades encourage us to buy more new, shiny stuff. But the famous song line, “Hey, Macklemore! Can we go thrift shopping?” by American rapper Ben Haggerty (a.k.a. Macklemore) suggests that fashion on a different trajectory. To put it simply, Macklemore’s song suggest that what’s old is new again. It is only by wearing kitschy material culture from the ’80s and ’90s found in a thrift shop that one can be considered fashionable and–as it is often said–cool. What ten years ago would have been discernible as a sign of a lack of good taste is today an ultimate example of being fashionable. In short, non-fashion is its own fashion today. The only new things are from the past.

Place, publisher, year, pages
PopAnth, 2013
Keywords
Material culture, Archaeology, Macklemore, Time travels
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-30964 (URN)
Available from: 2013-12-06 Created: 2013-12-06 Last updated: 2014-10-28Bibliographically approved
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