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Lindberg, Elisabeth
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Eskilsson, C., Lindberg, E., Carlsson, G., Ekebergh, M. & Hörberg, U. (2017). Managers’ responsibility to support caring and learning in clinical education units. Clinical Nursing Studies, 5(3), 34-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managers’ responsibility to support caring and learning in clinical education units
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2017 (English)In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 34-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Managers in clinical education units (CEUs) have the responsibility to facilitate evidence-based environments for both caring and learning. Promoting such environments might be challenging in times of financial constraints and organisation changes.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe how managers experience their responsibility to support the caring and learning environments in CEUs.

Methods: The study method followed the principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) grounded in a phenomenological approach. The study was conducted at a hospital in Southern Sweden. Ten first- and second-line managers responsible for CEUs were interviewed. The interviews were conducted as reflective dialogues using an open, and bridled approach.

Results: The results show that clinical education unit managers regard the responsibility to support caring and learning environments as a challenging experience, elucidated in three themes: (1) to have or to take responsibility; (2) cooperation that supports and challenges; and (3) bringing it all together— a daily struggle.

Conclusions: In conclusion, the managers of CEUs need to be aware of the importance of common theoretical grounds for caring and learning. Caring and learning are more likely to be intertwined when responsibility is taken, when collaboration between actors is characterised by respect and when an awareness of the importance of reflection is present. Awareness of the importance of creating opportunities for reflection and mutual collaboration among the different actors involved could lead to improvements in nursing education and, therefore, improved patient care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sciedu Press, 2017
Keywords
Managers, Clinical education unit, Responsibility, Caring, Learning
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66081 (URN)10.5430/cns.v5n3p34 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-07-03 Created: 2017-07-03 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Asp, M., Wiklund Gustin, L., Almerud Österberg, S., Hörberg, U., Lindberg, E. & Palmér, L. (2017). ”Samvetsstress och dåliga villkor bakom sjuksköterskeflykten”. Dagens nyheter (2017-05-04)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>”Samvetsstress och dåliga villkor bakom sjuksköterskeflykten”
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2017 (Swedish)In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2017-05-04Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66083 (URN)
Available from: 2017-07-03 Created: 2017-07-03 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, E., Hörberg, U., Persson, E. I. & Ekebergh, M. (2013). ‘‘It made me feel human’’: a phenomenological study of older patients’ experiences of participating in a team meeting. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 8(Article number: 20714)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘‘It made me feel human’’: a phenomenological study of older patients’ experiences of participating in a team meeting
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8, no Article number: 20714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study focused on older patients participating in a team meeting (TM) in a hospital ward in Sweden. A process had taken place on the ward, in which the traditional round had developed into a TM and understanding what participating in a TM means for the older patient is necessary for the development of care that facilitates older patient’s participation. The aim of this study was to describe the caring, as experienced by the older patients on a ward for older persons, with a specific focus on the team meeting. A reflective lifeworld research (RLR) design was used. Fifteen patients, 12 women and three men (mean age of 82 years) were interviewed while they were hospitalized in a hospital ward for older people. In the essential meaning of the phenomenon, the TM is described as being a part of a wider context of both caring and life. The need for hospitalization is an emotional struggle to overcome vulnerability and regain everyday freedom. The way in which the professionals are able to confirm vulnerability and create a caring relationship affects both the struggle for well-being and the possibilities for maintaining dignity. The essence is further explicated through its constituents; Vulnerability limits life; Life is left in the hands of someone else; Life is a whole and Space for existence. The result raises concern about how the care needs to be adjusted to older people’s needs as lived bodies. The encounter between the carer and the patient needs to be developed in order to get away from the view of the patient as object. An expanded vision may open up for existential dimensions of what brings meaning to life. One way, as described by the patients, is via the patient’s life stories, through which the patients can be seen as a whole human being.

Keywords
older persons, phenomenology, team meeting, patient participation, qualitative research
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-27279 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v8i0.20714 (DOI)000319734900001 ()23719214 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-06-28 Created: 2013-06-28 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, E., Persson, E. I., Hörberg, U. & Ekebergh, M. (2013). Older patients’ participation in team meeting: A phenomenological study from the nurses’ perspective. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 8, Article ID 21908.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older patients’ participation in team meeting: A phenomenological study from the nurses’ perspective
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8, article id 21908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although the importance of patient participation is acknowledged in today’s healthcare, many challenges remain beforepatient participation can become an integral part of care provision. The ward round has traditionally been the forum forcrucial decisions about patient care, but often with limited possibilities for patient participation. As part of the process ofimproving patient participation, the round in the present study has been replaced by a team meeting (TM) to which thepatient has been invited. The aim of this study is to highlight nurses’ experiences of older patients’ participation in TMs.The research process was guided by the principles of phenomenological reflective life world research. Data were collected in a Swedish hospital, in a ward specializing in older patients. Nine nurses, who had invited and planned for a patient toparticipate in TMs and/or had experienced TMs in which patients participated, were interviewed. The essential meaning ofpatient participation in the TM, as experienced by the nurses, is that patient participation can be supported by a saferelationship in which the patient can make his or her voice heard. Participation is challenged by the patients’ vulnerability and by the subordinated role assigned to the patient. The essential meaning is further described by its constituents: ‘‘the need for a guide,’’ ‘‘patient participation challenged by structures,’’ and ‘‘creating space for the whole human being.’’ In conclusion, the nurse plays a core role in guiding the patient in an unfamiliar situation. The meaning of patient participationin the TM needs to be discussed by professionals so that the patient perspective is present.

Keywords
Healthcare professionals, older people, patient participation, phenomenology, team meeting, ward round
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-31337 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v8i0.21908 (DOI)000328962300001 ()2-s2.0-84892588589 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-12-20 Created: 2013-12-20 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Ekebergh, M., Hörberg, U., Carlsson, G., Lindberg, E., Eskilsson, C., Holst, H. & Andersson, N. (2012). The Encounter between Caring Sciences and the Lifeworld: The Art of Making Knowledge Alive and Embodied. In: : . Paper presented at 31st International Human Science Research Conference, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada, 25-29 juni, 2012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Encounter between Caring Sciences and the Lifeworld: The Art of Making Knowledge Alive and Embodied
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2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Scientific knowledge is characterized by abstract descriptions and structures, which are not identical to the lived reality. Scientific knowledge cannot directly be applied on the lived existence, without being transformed and adjusted to the individual’s very complex lifeworld. Learning in caring contexts is an encounter between the scientific knowledge of caring and the learner’s lifeworld. This encounter needs a support that has the potential to bring caring science to life and to start an intertwining process with the lifeworld that creates embodied knowledge. Lifeworld didactics are built on an approach about learning as an individual process and that learning takes its point of departure in the learner’s previous experiences, which accompanies the learning process. The challenges within lifeworld didactics are to be open and sensitive to the learner’s lifeworld and with tact support the development of a reflective attitude in the learning process. Lifeworld didactics strategies are of crucial importance in different caring contexts. This symposium presents three lifeworld led phenomenological research projects that have focused on acquiring caring science knowledge in caring contexts, more precisely it is the encounter between caring science and the lifeworld. The research is within the framework of lifeworld didactics, but the three projects each have a special focus.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-23260 (URN)
Conference
31st International Human Science Research Conference, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada, 25-29 juni, 2012
Note

Bidraget är ett gemensamt symposium

Available from: 2013-01-04 Created: 2013-01-04 Last updated: 2017-02-17Bibliographically approved
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