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Holmberg, Jonas
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Gustavsson, L., Joelsson, J. M. & Truong, N. L. (2011). Where are biomass fuels best used in the Swedish energy system?: efficient use of biomass fuels given different targets with respect to CO2 emission and oil use reduction. Swedish Energy Agency
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Where are biomass fuels best used in the Swedish energy system?: efficient use of biomass fuels given different targets with respect to CO2 emission and oil use reduction
2011 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swedish Energy Agency, 2011. p. 44
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15611 (URN)
Available from: 2011-04-07 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2017-05-18Bibliographically approved
Joelsson, J. M., Gustavsson, L., Pingoud, K. & Soimakallio, S. (2009). CO2 balance and oil use reduction of syngas-derived motor fuels co-produced in pulp and paper mills: 17th European Biomass Conference & Exhibition, Hamburg, Germany, 29 June - 3 July.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CO2 balance and oil use reduction of syngas-derived motor fuels co-produced in pulp and paper mills: 17th European Biomass Conference & Exhibition, Hamburg, Germany, 29 June - 3 July
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15671 (URN)
Available from: 2009-12-17 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2011-11-09Bibliographically approved
Joelsson, J. M. & Gustavsson, L. (2009). Efficient biomass strategies to reduce CO2 emission and oil use.: 17th European Biomass Conference & Exhibition, Hamburg, Germany, 29 June - 3 July..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficient biomass strategies to reduce CO2 emission and oil use.: 17th European Biomass Conference & Exhibition, Hamburg, Germany, 29 June - 3 July.
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15669 (URN)
Available from: 2009-12-17 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2011-11-09Bibliographically approved
Joelsson, J. M., Gustavsson, L., Pingoud, K. & Soimakallio, S. (2009). Motor fuel production integrated with pulp mills – CO2 balance and oil use reduction for solid biomass gasification and black liquor gasification alternatives. In: 2nd Nordic wood biorefinery conference, Helsinki, Finland, September 2–4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motor fuel production integrated with pulp mills – CO2 balance and oil use reduction for solid biomass gasification and black liquor gasification alternatives
2009 (English)In: 2nd Nordic wood biorefinery conference, Helsinki, Finland, September 2–4, 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We study biomass-based motor fuel production integrated with pulp and paper mills and calculate oil use and CO2 emission balances. We compare two different processes – (1) integration of solid biomass gasification and FT diesel synthesis with a mill and (2) black liquor gasification (BLG) and methanol synthesis. CO2 emission and oil use balances are calculated and compared to alternative uses of biomass. We conclude that motor fuel production integrated with pulp mills is a more efficient option than stand-alone production of motor fuels. However, CO2 emissions can be more efficiently reduced if biomass replaces coal. BLG and solid biomass gasification have high system efficiencies. In a modern mill with low steam demand, the integration potential for solid biomass gasification is limited. If the studied systems are expanded with stand-alone production of fuel, so that the systems produce the same amount of motor fuel per t pulp, the BLG system has higher system efficiency due to the larger integration potential per t pulp.

National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15672 (URN)
Available from: 2010-09-13 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2011-11-09Bibliographically approved
Joelsson, J. & Gustavsson, L. (2008). Biorefineries for Efficient CO2 Reduction and Reduced Oil Dependency. In: 16th European biomass conference and exhibition: . Valencia, Spain
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biorefineries for Efficient CO2 Reduction and Reduced Oil Dependency
2008 (English)In: 16th European biomass conference and exhibition, Valencia, Spain, 2008Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Valencia, Spain: , 2008
Keywords
Biorefinery, biomass, climate change, oil use
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15667 (URN)6084 (Local ID)6084 (Archive number)6084 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-11-13 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2015-01-13Bibliographically approved
Joelsson, J. & Gustavsson, L. (2008). Black liquor gasification for electricity or transportation fuel?. In: 2008 Nordic wood biorefinery conference, Proceedings: .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Black liquor gasification for electricity or transportation fuel?
2008 (English)In: 2008 Nordic wood biorefinery conference, Proceedings, 2008Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15666 (URN)6005 (Local ID)6005 (Archive number)6005 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-12-08 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2015-01-13Bibliographically approved
Joelsson, J. & Gustavsson, L. (2008). CO2 emission and oil use reduction through black liquor gasification and energy efficiency in pulp and paper industry. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 52(5), 747-763
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CO2 emission and oil use reduction through black liquor gasification and energy efficiency in pulp and paper industry
2008 (English)In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 747-763Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examine consequences of new energy technologies in the pulp and paper industry with respect to net CO2 emissions and oil use. The entire production chain from the extraction of primary resources is included in the analysis. Stand-alone production of electricity and transportation fuel from biomass is included to balance the systems compared, so that they produce the same CO2 emission and oil use reductions. The technologies considered are black liquor gasification (BLG) with electricity and motor fuels production in chemical pulp mills and increased energy efficiency in thermomechanical pulp mills. The technologies are evaluated with respect to net CO2 emission, oil use, primary energy use, biomass use and monetary cost. We find that BLG in chemical pulp mills is favourable compared to stand-alone production of fuels and electricity from biomass. It is more efficient to implement BLG with motor fuels production and stand-alone electricity production from biomass, than to implement BLG with electricity production and stand-alone production of motor fuels. Increased energy efficiency in refining of thermomechanical pulp gives CO2 savings more efficiently than stand-alone production of electricity from biomass. Sensitivity analysis indicates that our conclusions are robust with respect to energy and biomass prices and the choice of coal or natural gas for marginal electricity. Newsprint from thermomechanical pulp would require slightly less biomass and have lower costs than paper from chemical pulp, per metric ton (t) product, when the systems are also required to render the same oil use and CO2 emission reductions. Substituting mineral fillers for 25% of the chemical pulp changes the balance in favour of the chemical pulp paper. At an oil price of 40 US$/barrel, all studied pulp and paper mill technology improvements give unchanged or reduced monetary costs also when oil use and CO2 emissions are not balanced with stand-alone bioenergy plants.

National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15668 (URN)10.1016/j.resconrec.2007.11.002 (DOI)000254446600007 ()38949088197 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-12-09 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Holmberg, J. M. & Gustavsson, L. (2007). Biomass use in chemical and mechanical pulping with biomass-based energy supply. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 52(2), 331-350
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomass use in chemical and mechanical pulping with biomass-based energy supply
2007 (English)In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 331-350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The pulp and paper industry is energy intensive and consumes large amounts of wood. Biomass is a limited resource and its efficient use is therefore important. In this study, the total amount of biomass used for pulp and for energy is estimated for the production of several woodfree (containing only chemical pulp) and mechanical (containing mechanical pulp) printing paper products, under Swedish conditions. Chemical pulp mills today are largely self-sufficient in energy while mechanical pulp mills depend on large amounts of external electricity. Technically, all energy used in pulp- and papermaking can be biomass based. Here, we assume that all energy used, including external electricity and motor fuels, is based on forest biomass. The whole cradle-to-gate chain is included in the analyses. The results indicate that the total amount of biomass required per tonne paper is slightly lower for woodfree than for mechanical paper. For the biomass use per paper area, the paper grammage is decisive. If the grammage can be lowered by increasing the proportion of mechanical pulp, this may lower the biomass use per paper area, despite the higher biomass use per unit mass in mechanical paper. In the production of woodfree paper, energy recovery from residues in the mill accounts for most of the biomass use, while external electricity production accounts for the largest part for mechanical paper. Motor fuel production accounts for 5–7% of the biomass use. The biomass contained in the final paper product is 21–42% of the total biomass use, indicating that waste paper recovery is important. The biomass use was found to be about 15–17% lower for modelled, modern mills compared with mills representative of today's average technology.

Keywords
Biomass-based energy, Efficient use of biomass, Pulp and paper industry, Mechanical paper, Woodfree paper
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15649 (URN)10.1016/j.resconrec.2007.05.002 (DOI)000250633600011 ()
Available from: 2008-12-10 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Holmberg, J. M. & Gustavsson, L. (2007). Systems aspects on new energy technologies in the pulp and paper industry. In: Proceedings. 3rd International Green Energy Conference IGEC-III June 18 - 20, 2007 Västerås, Sweden: .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systems aspects on new energy technologies in the pulp and paper industry
2007 (English)In: Proceedings. 3rd International Green Energy Conference IGEC-III June 18 - 20, 2007 Västerås, Sweden, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Concerns about energy security, energy prices, and the impact of energy use on the global climate have put focus on ways to reduce CO2 emissions and oil dependency. In this paper we examine consequences of new energy technologies in the pulp and paper industry and estimate the costs for achieving certain CO2 emissions and oil use reductions with different pulp mill technologies. Stand-alone production of electricity and transportation fuel from biomass is included to balance the systems compared, so that they produce the same CO2 emission and oil use reductions. The technologies considered are black liquor gasification (BLG) with electricity and motor fuels production in chemical pulp mills and increased energy efficiency in mechanical pulp mills. The entire production chain from the extraction of primary resources is included in the analysis. Changes in the production chain are assumed to affect energy production on the margin. The technology alternatives are evaluated with respect to five parameters: Net CO2 emission, oil use, primary energy use, biomass use and monetary cost. We find that BLG in chemical pulp mills is favourable compared to stand-alone production of fuels and electricity from biomass. If both CO2 emission reductions and oil use reductions are to be achieved, it is more efficient to implement BLG with motor fuels production and stand-alone electricity production from biomass, than to implement BLG with electricity production and stand-alone production of motor fuels. Increased energy efficiency in refining of thermomechanical pulp is found to achieve CO2 savings more efficiently than stand-alone production of electricity from biomass.

Keywords
bioenergy, black liquor gasification, climate change mitigation, energy efficiency, oil use reduction, thermomechanical pulping
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15651 (URN)4950 (Local ID)4950 (Archive number)4950 (OAI)
Available from: 2011-11-08 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2015-01-13Bibliographically approved
Gustavsson, L., Holmberg, J., Dornburg, V., Sathre, R., Eggers, T., Mahapatra, K. & Marland, G. (2007). Using biomass for climate change mitigation and oil use reduction. Energy Policy, 35(11), 5671-5691
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using biomass for climate change mitigation and oil use reduction
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2007 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 35, no 11, p. 5671-5691Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we examine how an increased use of biomass could efficiently meet Swedish energy policy goals of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and oil use. In particular, we examine the trade-offs inherent when biomass use is intended to pursue multiple objectives. We set up four scenarios in which up to 400 PJ/year of additional biomass is prioritised to reduce CO2 emissions, reduce oil use, simultaneously reduce both CO2 emission and oil use, or to produce ethanol to replace gasoline. Technologies analysed for using the biomass include the production of electricity, heat, and transport fuels, and also as construction materials and other products. We find that optimising biomass use for a single objective (either CO2 emission reduction or oil use reduction) results in high fulfilment of that single objective (17.4 Tg C/year and 350 PJ oil/year, respectively), at a monetary cost of 130–330 million €/year, but with low fulfilment of the other objective. A careful selection of biomass uses for combined benefits results in reductions of 12.6 Tg C/year and 230 PJ oil/year (72% and 67%, respectively, of the reductions achieved in the scenarios with single objectives), with a monetary benefit of 45 million €/year. Prioritising for ethanol production gives the lowest CO2 emissions reduction, intermediate oil use reduction, and the highest monetary cost.

Keywords
biomass, climate change, bioenergy, energy security, oil use reduction, efficient use of biomass
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15604 (URN)10.1016/j.enpol.2007.05.023 (DOI)000250545300042 ()4448 (Local ID)4448 (Archive number)4448 (OAI)
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VR-Economics

Available from: 2008-11-25 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved

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