lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Verhagen, Josanne H.
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Naguib, M. M., Verhagen, J. H., Samy, A., Eriksson, P., Fife, M., Lundkvist, Å., . . . Järhult, J. D. (2019). Avian influenza viruses at the wild–domestic bird interface in Egypt. Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, 9(1), 1-9, Article ID 1575687.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Avian influenza viruses at the wild–domestic bird interface in Egypt
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-9, article id 1575687Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wild birds of the orders Anseriformes (mainly ducks, geese and swans) and Charadriiformes (mainly gulls, terns and waders) constitute the natural reservoir for low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses. In Egypt, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 and LPAI H9N2 viruses are endemic in domestic poultry, forming a threat to animal and human health and raising questions about the routes of introduction and mechanisms of persistence. Recently, HPAI H5N8 virus was also introduced into Egyptian domestic birds. Here we review the literature on the role of wild birds in the introduction and endemicity of avian influenza viruses in Egypt. Dabbling ducks in Egypt harbor an extensive LPAI virus diversity and may constitute the route of introduction for HPAI H5N1 and HPAI H5N8 viruses into Egypt through migration, however their role in the endemicity of HPAI H5N1, LPAI H9N2 and potentially other avian influenza virus (AIV) strains–by means of reassortment of viral genes–is less clear. Strengthened surveillance programs, in both domestic and wild birds, that include all LPAI virus subtypes and full genome sequencing are needed to better assess the wild–domestic bird interface and form a basis for evidence-based measures to limit and prevent AIV transmission between wild and domestic birds. © 2019, © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Africa, AIV, ecology, epidemiology, H5N1, HPAIV, IAV, LPAIV, migration, wild birds
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86380 (URN)10.1080/20008686.2019.1575687 (DOI)2-s2.0-85061807796 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-11 Created: 2019-07-11 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
van Dijk, J. G. B., Verhagen, J. H., Wille, M. & Waldenström, J. (2018). Host and virus ecology as determinants of influenza A virus transmission in wild birds. Current Opinion in Virology, 28, 26-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Host and virus ecology as determinants of influenza A virus transmission in wild birds
2018 (English)In: Current Opinion in Virology, ISSN 1879-6257, E-ISSN 1879-6265, Vol. 28, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low pathogenic influenza A virus (LPIAV) prevalence and subtype distribution differs between and across bird taxa. A crucial factor in the epidemiology of these viruses and virus subtypes is the ability to transmit between and within different host taxa and individuals. Successful viral transmission depends on availability of susceptible hosts and exposure of host to virus. Exposure to viruses and susceptibility to virus infection and/or disease are shaped by both host and virus traits. In this review we have identified key host and virus traits that can affect LPIAV transmission, both in terms of exposure and susceptibility. Furthermore we highlight current challenges in assessment of these traits and identify methodological considerations for future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72299 (URN)10.1016/j.coviro.2017.10.006 (DOI)000427665300007 ()29121508 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032943205 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-10 Created: 2018-04-10 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Lim, S. M., Geervliet, M., Verhagen, J. H., Muskens, G. J., Majoor, F. A., Osterhaus, A. D. & Martina, B. E. (2018). Serologic evidence of West Nile virus and Usutu virus infections in Eurasian coots in the Netherlands. Zoonoses and Public Health, 65(1), 96-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serologic evidence of West Nile virus and Usutu virus infections in Eurasian coots in the Netherlands
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Zoonoses and Public Health, ISSN 1863-1959, E-ISSN 1863-2378, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 96-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

West Nile virus (WNV) and Usutu virus (USUV) are arboviruses that are maintained in enzootic transmission cycles between mosquitoes and birds and are occasionally transmitted to mammals. As arboviruses are currently expanding their geographic range and emerging in often unpredictable locations, surveillance is considered an important element of preparedness. To determine whether sera collected from resident and migratory birds in the Netherlands as part of avian influenza surveillance would also represent an effective source for proactive arbovirus surveillance, a random selection of such sera was screened for WNV antibodies using a commercial ELISA. In addition, sera of jackdaws and carrion crows captured for previous experimental infection studies were added to the selection. Of the 265 screened serum samples, 27 were found to be WNV-antibody-positive, and subsequent cross-neutralization experiments using WNV and USUV confirmed that five serum samples were positive for only WNV-neutralizing antibodies and seven for only USUV. The positive birds consisted of four Eurasian coots (Fulica atra) and one carrion crow (Corvus corone) for WNV, of which the latter may suggest local presence of the virus, and only Eurasian coots for USUV. As a result, the screening of a small selection of serum samples originally collected for avian influenza surveillance demonstrated a seroprevalence of 1.6% for WNV and 2.8% for USUV, suggesting that this sustained infrastructure could serve as a useful source for future surveillance of arboviruses such as WNV and USUV in the Netherlands.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
reservoir hosts, surveillance, Usutu virus, vector-borne diseases, West Nile virus, wild birds
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70568 (URN)10.1111/zph.12375 (DOI)000419943900041 ()28688117 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021909130 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
van den Brand, J. M. A., Verhagen, J. H., Kroeze, E. J. B., van de Bildt, M. W. G., Bodewes, R., Herfst, S., . . . Kuiken, T. (2018). Wild ducks excrete highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N8 (2014-2015) without clinical or pathological evidence of disease. Emerging Microbes & Infections, 7, Article ID 67.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wild ducks excrete highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N8 (2014-2015) without clinical or pathological evidence of disease
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Emerging Microbes & Infections, ISSN 2222-1751, Vol. 7, article id 67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) is essentially a poultry disease. Wild birds have traditionally not been involved in its spread, but the epidemiology of HPAI has changed in recent years. After its emergence in southeastern Asia in 1996, H5 HPAI virus of the Goose/Guangdong lineage has evolved into several sub-lineages, some of which have spread over thousands of kilometers via long-distance migration of wild waterbirds. In order to determine whether the virus is adapting to wild waterbirds, we experimentally inoculated the HPAI H5N8 virus clade 2.3.4.4 group A from 2014 into four key waterbird species-Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope), common teal (Anas crecca), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and common pochard (Aythya ferina)-and compared virus excretion and disease severity with historical data of the HPAI H5N1 virus infection from 2005 in the same four species. Our results showed that excretion was highest in Eurasian wigeons for the 2014 virus, whereas excretion was highest in common pochards and mallards for the 2005 virus. The 2014 virus infection was subclinical in all four waterbird species, while the 2005 virus caused clinical disease and pathological changes in over 50% of the common pochards. In chickens, the 2014 virus infection caused systemic disease and high mortality, similar to the 2005 virus. In conclusion, the evidence was strongest for Eurasian wigeons as long-distance vectors for HPAI H5N8 virus from 2014. The implications of the switch in speciesspecific virus excretion and decreased disease severity may be that the HPAI H5 virus more easily spreads in the wildwaterbird population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76749 (URN)10.1038/s41426-018-0070-9 (DOI)000430367700002 ()29670093 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045692673 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-10 Created: 2018-07-10 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Verhagen, J. H., Lexmond, P., Vuong, O., Schutten, M., Guldemeester, J., Osterhaus, A. D. M., . . . Fouchier, R. A. M. (2017). Discordant detection of avian influenza virus subtypes in time and space between poultry and wild birds: Towards improvement of surveillance programs. PLoS ONE, 12(3), Article ID e0173470.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discordant detection of avian influenza virus subtypes in time and space between poultry and wild birds: Towards improvement of surveillance programs
Show others...
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0173470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Avian influenza viruses from wild birds can cause outbreaks in poultry, and occasionally infect humans upon exposure to infected poultry. Identification and characterization of viral reservoirs and transmission routes is important to develop strategies that prevent infection of poultry, and subsequently virus transmission between poultry holdings and to humans. Based on spatial, temporal and phylogenetic analyses of data generated as part of intense and large-scale influenza surveillance programs in wild birds and poultry in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2011, we demonstrate that LPAIV subtype distribution differed between wild birds and poultry, suggestive of host-range restrictions. LPAIV isolated from Dutch poultry were genetically most closely related to LPAIV isolated from wild birds in the Netherlands or occasionally elsewhere in Western Europe. However, a relatively long time interval was observed between the isolations of related viruses from wild birds and poultry. Spatial analyses provided evidence for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) being more abundant near primary infected poultry farms. Detailed year-round investigation of virus prevalence and wild bird species distribution and behavior near poultry farms should be used to improve risk assessment in relation to avian influenza virus introduction and retarget avian influenza surveillance programs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2017
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-61681 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0173470 (DOI)000396087900097 ()2-s2.0-85014936226 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-24 Created: 2017-03-24 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Yin, S., Kleijn, D., Muskens, G. J. D., Fouchier, R. A. M., Verhagen, J. H., Glazov, P. M., . . . de Boer, W. F. (2017). No evidence that migratory geese disperse avian influenza viruses from breeding to wintering ground. PLoS ONE, 12(5), Article ID e0177790.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No evidence that migratory geese disperse avian influenza viruses from breeding to wintering ground
Show others...
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e0177790Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low pathogenic avian influenza virus can mutate to a highly pathogenic strain that causes severe clinical signs in birds and humans. Migratory waterfowl, especially ducks, are considered the main hosts of low pathogenic avian influenza virus, but the role of geese in dispersing the virus over long-distances is still unclear. We collected throat and cloaca samples from three goose species, Bean goose (Anser fabalis), Barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis) and Greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons), from their breeding grounds, spring stopover sites, and wintering grounds. We tested if the geese were infected with low pathogenic avian influenza virus outside of their wintering grounds, and analysed the spatial and temporal patterns of infection prevalence on their wintering grounds. Our results show that geese were not infected before their arrival on wintering grounds. Barnacle geese and Greater white-fronted geese had low prevalence of infection just after their arrival on wintering grounds in the Netherlands, but the prevalence increased in successive months, and peaked after December. This suggests that migratory geese are exposed to the virus after their arrival on wintering grounds, indicating that migratory geese might not disperse low pathogenic avian influenza virus during autumn migration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PLOS, 2017
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66987 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0177790 (DOI)000401672400083 ()28542340 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019397451 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-20 Created: 2017-07-20 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Poen, M. J., Verhagen, J. H., Manvell, R. J., Brown, I., Bestebroer, T. M., van der Vliet, S., . . . Fouchier, R. A. (2016). Lack of virological and serological evidence for continued circulation of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8 virus in wild birds in the Netherlands, 14 November 2014 to 31 January 2016.. Eurosurveillance, 21(38), 11-21, Article ID 30349.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lack of virological and serological evidence for continued circulation of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8 virus in wild birds in the Netherlands, 14 November 2014 to 31 January 2016.
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 21, no 38, p. 11-21, article id 30349Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2014, H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the A/Goose/Guangdong/1/1996 lineage emerged in poultry and wild birds in Asia, Europe and North America. Here, wild birds were extensively investigated in the Netherlands for HPAI H5N8 virus (real-time polymerase chain reaction targeting the matrix and H5 gene) and antibody detection (haemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralisation assays) before, during and after the first virus detection in Europe in late 2014. Between 21 February 2015 and 31 January 2016, 7,337 bird samples were tested for the virus. One HPAI H5N8 virus-infected Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope) sampled on 25 February 2015 was detected. Serological assays were performed on 1,443 samples, including 149 collected between 2007 and 2013, 945 between 14 November 2014 and 13 May 2015, and 349 between 1 September and 31 December 2015. Antibodies specific for HPAI H5 clade 2.3.4.4 were absent in wild bird sera obtained before 2014 and present in sera collected during and after the HPAI H5N8 emergence in Europe, with antibody incidence declining after the 2014/15 winter. Our results indicate that the HPAI H5N8 virus has not continued to circulate extensively in wild bird populations since the 2014/15 winter and that independent maintenance of the virus in these populations appears unlikely.

Keywords
avian influenza, emerging or re-emerging diseases, epidemiology, outbreaks, surveillance, viral infections
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75815 (URN)10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2016.21.38.30349 (DOI)000384146100003 ()27684783 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Verhagen, J. H., Herfst, S. & Fouchier, R. A. (2015). How a virus travels the world. Science, 347(6222), 616-617
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How a virus travels the world
2015 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 347, no 6222, p. 616-617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75820 (URN)10.1126/science.aaa6724 (DOI)000349145200026 ()25657235 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved
Lewis, N. S., Verhagen, J. H., Javakhishvili, Z., Russell, C. A., Lexmond, P., Westgeest, K. B., . . . de Graaf, M. (2015). Influenza A virus evolution and spatio-temporal dynamics in Eurasian wild birds: a phylogenetic and phylogeographical study of whole-genome sequence data. Journal of General Virology, 96, 2050-2060
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influenza A virus evolution and spatio-temporal dynamics in Eurasian wild birds: a phylogenetic and phylogeographical study of whole-genome sequence data
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Journal of General Virology, ISSN 0022-1317, E-ISSN 1465-2099, Vol. 96, p. 2050-2060Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low pathogenic avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) have a natural host reservoir in wild waterbirds and the potential to spread to other host species. Here, we investigated the evolutionary, spatial and temporal dynamics of avian IAVs in Eurasian wild birds. We used whole-genome sequences collected as part of an intensive long-term Eurasian wild bird surveillance study, and combined this genetic data with temporal and spatial information to explore the virus evolutionary dynamics. Frequent reassortment and co-circulating lineages were observed for all eight genomic RNA segments over time. There was no apparent species-specific effect on the diversity of the avian IAVs. There was a spatial and temporal relationship between the Eurasian sequences and significant viral migration of avian lAVs from West Eurasia towards Central Eurasia. The observed viral migration patterns differed between segments. Furthermore, we discuss the challenges faced when analysing these surveillance and sequence data, and the caveats to be borne in mind when drawing conclusions from the apparent results of such analyses.

National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-46907 (URN)10.1099/vir.0.000155 (DOI)000362243000007 ()25904147 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84938127397 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-26 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Verhagen, J. H., Höfle, U., van Amerongen, G., van de Bildt, M., Majoor, F., Fouchier, R. A. & Kuiken, T. (2015). Long-Term Effect of Serial Infections with H13 and H16 Low-Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Black-Headed Gulls.. Journal of Virology, 89(22), 11507-11522
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Effect of Serial Infections with H13 and H16 Low-Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Black-Headed Gulls.
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 89, no 22, p. 11507-11522Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

UNLABELLED: Infections of domestic and wild birds with low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) have been associated with protective immunity to subsequent infection. However, the degree and duration of immunity in wild birds from previous LPAIV infection, by the same or a different subtype, are poorly understood. Therefore, we inoculated H13N2 (A/black-headed gull/Netherlands/7/2009) and H16N3 (A/black-headed gull/Netherlands/26/2009) LPAIVs into black-headed gulls (Chroicocephalus ridibundus), their natural host species, and measured the long-term immune response and protection against one or two reinfections over a period of >1 year. This is the typical interval between LPAIV epizootics in wild birds. Reinfection with the same virus resulted in progressively less virus excretion, with complete abrogation of virus excretion after two infections for H13 but not H16. However, reinfection with the other virus affected neither the level nor duration of virus excretion. Virus excretion by immunologically naive birds did not differ in total levels of excreted H13 or H16 virus between first- and second-year birds, but the duration of H13 excretion was shorter for second-year birds. Furthermore, serum antibody levels did not correlate with protection against LPAIV infection. LPAIV-infected gulls showed no clinical signs of disease. These results imply that the epidemiological cycles of H13 and H16 in black-headed gulls are relatively independent from each other and depend mainly on infection of first-year birds.

IMPORTANCE: Low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) circulate mainly in wild water birds but are occasionally transmitted to other species, including humans, where they cause subclinical to fatal disease. To date, the effect of LPAIV-specific immunity on the epidemiology of LPAIV in wild birds is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of H13 and H16 LPAIV infection in black-headed gulls on susceptibility and virus excretion of subsequent infection with the same or the other virus within the same breeding season and between breeding seasons. These are the only two LPAIV hemagglutinin subtypes predominating in this species. The findings suggest that H13 and H16 LPAIV cycles in black-headed gull populations are independent of each other, indicate the importance of first-year birds in LPAIV epidemiology, and emphasize the need for alternatives to avian influenza virus (AIV)-specific serum antibodies as evidence of past LPAIV infection and correlates of protection against LPAIV infection in wild birds.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Zoonotic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75816 (URN)10.1128/JVI.01765-15 (DOI)000363467200028 ()26339062 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications