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Tyrkkö, Jukka
Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Hiltunen, T. & Tyrkkö, J. (2019). Academic Vocabulary in Wikipedia Articles: Frequency and Dispersion in Uneven Datasets. In: Carl Suhr, Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen (Ed.), From Data to Evidence in English Language Research: (pp. 282-306). Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Academic Vocabulary in Wikipedia Articles: Frequency and Dispersion in Uneven Datasets
2019 (English)In: From Data to Evidence in English Language Research / [ed] Carl Suhr, Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019, p. 282-306Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Despite its popularity, the status of Wikipedia in higher education settings remains somewhat controversial, and the linguistic characteristics of the genre have not been exhaustively described. This exploratory paper takes a data-driven approach to assessing the use of academic vocabulary in Wikipedia articles. Our analysis is based on Coxhead’s Academic Word List, and the data comes from the Westbury Lab Wikipedia Corpus. We employ methods of statistical data analysis to classify Wikipedia articles according to the frequencies of academic words, and apply the same procedure to a comparable set of texts representing another genre, published research articles. The unsupervised classification procedure groups the articles according to academic content regardless of topic, which allows us to measure genre-specific similarities. The findings of the study show that academic words are common in both genres in focus, and more interestingly, if we look at aggregate frequencies of academic words, Wikipedia articles are not markedly different from RAs within the same discipline. This being said, we can observe disciplinary differences in the distribution of academic words in Wikipedia, such that Economics writing contains more academic words than the other two disciplines in focus. Disciplinary differences can likewise be observed in the distribution of individual academic words.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019
Series
Language and Computers, ISSN 0921-5034 ; 83
Keywords
wikipedia, corpus linguistics, dispersion, statistics
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79630 (URN)10.1163/9789004390652_013 (DOI)978-90-04-39065-2 (ISBN)978-90-04-39064-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-18 Created: 2019-01-18 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Reski, N., Alissandrakis, A. & Tyrkkö, J. (2019). Collaborative exploration of rich corpus data using immersive virtual reality and non-immersive technologies. In: ADDA: Approaches to Digital Discourse Analysis – ADDA 2, Turku, Finland 23-25 May 2019 ; Book of abstracts. Paper presented at 2nd International Conference: Approaches to Digital Discourse Analysis (ADDA 2), 23-25 May, 2019, Turku, Finland (pp. 7-7). Turku: University of Turku
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative exploration of rich corpus data using immersive virtual reality and non-immersive technologies
2019 (English)In: ADDA: Approaches to Digital Discourse Analysis – ADDA 2, Turku, Finland 23-25 May 2019 ; Book of abstracts, Turku: University of Turku , 2019, p. 7-7Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In recent years, large textual data sets, comprising many data points and rich metadata, have become a common object of investigation and analysis. Information Visualization and Visual Analytics provide practical tools for visual data analysis, most commonly as interactive two-dimensional (2D) visualizations that are displayed through normal computer monitors. At the same time, display technologies have evolved rapidly over the past decade. In particular, emerging technologies such as virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), or mixed reality (MR) have become affordable and more user-friendly (LaValle 2016). Under the banner of “Immersive Analytics”, researchers started to explore the novel application of such immersive technologies for the purpose of data analysis (Marriott et al. 2018).

By using immersive technologies, researchers hope to increase motivation and user engagement for the overall data analysis activity as well as providing different perspectives on the data. This can be particularly helpful in the case of exploratory data analysis, when the researcher attempts to identify interesting points or anomalies in the data without prior knowledge of what exactly they are searching for. Furthermore, the data analysis process often involves the collaborative sharing of information and knowledge between multiple users for the goal of interpreting and making sense of the explored data together (Isenberg et al. 2011). However, immersive technologies such as VR are often rather single user-centric experiences, where one user is wearing a head-mounted display (HMD) device and is thus visually isolated from the real-world surroundings. Consequently, new tools and approaches for co-located, synchronous collaboration in such immersive data analysis scenarios are needed.

In this software demonstration, we present our developed VR system that enables two users to explore data at the same time, one inside an immersive VR environment, and one outside VR using a non-immersive companion application. The context of this demonstrated data analysis activity is centered around the exploration of the language variability in tweets from the perspectives of multilingualism and sociolinguistics (see, e.g. Coats 2017 and Grieve et al. 2017). Our primary data come from the the Nordic Tweet Stream (NTS) corpus (Laitinen et al. 2018, Tyrkkö 2018), and the immersive VR application visualizes in three dimensions (3D) the clustered Twitter traffic within the Nordic region as stacked cuboids according to their geospatial position, where each stack represents a color-coded language share (Alissandrakis et al. 2018). Through the utilization of 3D gestural input, the VR user can interact with the data using hand postures and gestures in order to move through the virtual 3D space, select clusters and display more detailed information, and to navigate through time (Reski and Alissandrakis 2019) ( https://vrxar.lnu.se/apps/odxvrxnts-360/ ). A non-immersive companion application, running in a normal web browser, presents an overview map of the Nordic region as well as other supplemental information about the data that are more suitable to be displayed using non-immersive technologies.

We will present two complementary applications, each with a different objective within the collaborative data analysis framework. The design and implementation of certain connectivity and collaboration features within these applications facilitate the co-located, synchronous exploration and sensemaking. For instance, the VR user’s position and orientation are displayed and updated in real-time within the overview map of the non-immersive application. The other way around, the selected cluster of the non-immersive user is also highlighted for the user in VR. Initial tests with pairs of language students validated the proof-of-concept of the developed collaborative system and encourage the conduction of further future investigations in this direction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turku: University of Turku, 2019
Keywords
virtual reality, Nordic Tweet Stream, digital humanities, immersive analytics
National Category
Human Computer Interaction General Language Studies and Linguistics Language Technology (Computational Linguistics)
Research subject
Computer and Information Sciences Computer Science, Computer Science; Computer Science, Information and software visualization; Humanities, Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-83858 (URN)
Conference
2nd International Conference: Approaches to Digital Discourse Analysis (ADDA 2), 23-25 May, 2019, Turku, Finland
Projects
DISA-DHOpen Data Exploration in Virtual Reality (ODxVR)
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved
Kopaczyk, J. & Tyrkkö, J. (Eds.). (2018). Applications of Pattern-driven Methods in Corpus Linguistics. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applications of Pattern-driven Methods in Corpus Linguistics
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The use of corpora has conventionally been envisioned as being either corpus-based or corpus-driven. While the formal definition of the latter term has been widely accepted since it was established by Tognini-Bonelli (2001), it is often applied to studies that do not, in fact, fullfil the fundamental requirement of a theory-neutral starting point. This volume proposes the term pattern-driven as a more precise alternative. The chapters illustrate a variety of methods that fall under this broad methodology, such as the extraction of lexical bundles, POS-grams and semantic frames, and demonstrate how these approaches can uncover new understandings of both synchronic and diachronic linguistic phenomena.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018. p. 313
Series
Studies in Corpus Linguistics, ISSN 1388-0373 ; 82
Keywords
corpus linguistics, english language, methodology
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71273 (URN)10.1075/scl.82 (DOI)9789027200136 (ISBN)9789027264565 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-03-03 Created: 2018-03-03 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved
Kopaczyk, J. & Tyrkkö, J. (2018). Blogging around the world: Universal and localised patterns in Online Englishes. In: Joanna Kopaczyk, Jukka Tyrkkö (Ed.), Applications of Pattern-driven Methods in Corpus Linguistics: (pp. 277-310). Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blogging around the world: Universal and localised patterns in Online Englishes
2018 (English)In: Applications of Pattern-driven Methods in Corpus Linguistics / [ed] Joanna Kopaczyk, Jukka Tyrkkö, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 277-310Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The borderless nature of blogging raises the question whether the traditional regionally defined varieties of English continue to hold true (see Crystal 2011). In order to investigate the extent to which the language published online without external intervention is similar around the world, this chapter investigates repetitive patterns, or 3-grams, found in blogs in the 583-million-word GloWbE corpus (Davies 2013). The data shows two types of repetitive word sequences: universal, or those that are frequent in all or most of the nineteen geographic locations represented in the corpus, and localised, or those unique to specific regions. We explore multiple ways of approaching the regional distribution of universal and localised 3-grams, such as statistical similarity measures (Jaccard coefficient and hierarchical clustering) and network visualisations. Three correlated research issues are addressed by this study: (1) the ratio of 3-grams in blogs from various World Englishes, which will shed light onto the degree of formulaicity in Web Englishes around the world; (2) the overlaps between various locations in terms of preferred sequences, which may point to local or global standardization hubs on the level of sentence and text construction; (3) finally, the status of model-providing varieties for internet communication, especially American English, in view of the most frequent 3-grams from other locations (cf. Mair 2013).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018
Series
Studies in Corpus Linguistics, ISSN 1388-0373 ; 82
Keywords
corpus linguistics, methodology, Internet, computer-mediated communication
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71275 (URN)10.1075/scl.82.11kop (DOI)9789027200136 (ISBN)9789027264565 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-03-03 Created: 2018-03-03 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved
Levin, M., Ström Herold, J. & Tyrkkö, J. (2018). From the BBC to the PFC and CAPTCHA: Acronym typology from a cross-linguistic perspective. In: ICAME 39, Tampere, 30 May – 3 June, 2018, Corpus Linguistics and Changing Society: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at ICAME 39, Tampere, 30 May – 3 June, 2018, Corpus Linguistics and Changing Society (pp. 108-109). Tampere: University of Tampere
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From the BBC to the PFC and CAPTCHA: Acronym typology from a cross-linguistic perspective
2018 (English)In: ICAME 39, Tampere, 30 May – 3 June, 2018, Corpus Linguistics and Changing Society: Book of Abstracts, Tampere: University of Tampere , 2018, p. 108-109Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Acronyms are prevalent and increasingly frequent both in English (Leech et al. 2009: 212–213) and other languages, such as German (Steinhauer 2000: 1), a development which mirrors the increasing societal prominence of science/technology and politics/business outside specialized domains (Kobler-Trill 1994: 200). Although acronyms allow brief and unambiguous communication among experts, they also decrease transparency for non-experts both when it comes to retrieving the full form of the acronym (e.g., LSD) or its referent (UNFCCC). The potential lack of transparency is further compounded in translations due to cultural differences. However, few previous studies have addressed the translation of acronyms and none from a corpus-based perspective.

This study investigates the use of acronyms in English originals and their translations into German and Swedish, comparing forms, functions and distributions across the languages. A major outcome will be a typology of translation strategies and acronym use in the three languages. The material consists of an English-German-Swedish popular non-fiction parallel corpus currently being compiled by the authors. This genre covers, for instance, popular science and biographies, and the texts are aimed at informing and entertaining non-specialist audiences. Therefore, writers and translators need to strike a balance between brevity and transparency without compromising accuracy or alienating readers.

Preliminary results suggest that acronyms most often occur as noun phrase heads (When IBM introduced…), but they are also frequent in more complex structures such as English premodifiers (PGP encryption) and German (UN-Klimakonvention) and Swedish compounds (NKVD-officer) (cf. Ström Herold & Levin in preparation). They also occasionally form part of new words (NAFTA-style). This flexibility is likely facilitated by the simplex forms of acronyms (Fleischer & Barz 2012: 284).

The first-time mentions of acronyms in texts are of particular interest. Based on our popular non-fiction corpus, knowledge of some frequent acronyms is presupposed (e.g., DNA tests), others are given as appositive noun phrases alongside the full form (The chemical dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (usually known as DDT) […]) (cf. Biber & Gray 2016: 202–207), while some receive more extensive meta-linguistic comments (WYSIWYG, pronounced "wiz-ee-wig," an acronym for "What you see is what you get."). This is also found in translations, which can be either more or less explicit than the original:

(1a)  Complete the CAPTCHA (Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart), and you're in.

(1b) den CAPTCHA […] (den ”Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart", also den ”vollautomatischen öffentlichen Turingtest zur Unterscheidung von Computern und Menschen") [’i.e. the ”completely-automated…”’]

(1c) captcha-rutan (ett robotfilter för att skilja människor från datorer) [’the captcha-box (a robot-filter to tell …’]

The translations of first-time mentions vary greatly between German and Swedish target texts. Important factors are the target audience’s (assumed) culture-specific knowledge and their knowledge of English. Our acronym typology will consider structural and pragmatic features and their relevance to translation.

References

Biber, Douglas & Bethany Gray. 2016. Grammatical complexity in academic English. Linguistic change in writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Fleischer, Wolfgang & Irmhild Barz. 2012. Wortbildung der deutschen Gegenwartssprache. Berlin: De Gruyter.

Kobler-Trill, Dorothea. 1994. Das Kurzwort im Deutschen. Eine Untersuchung zu Definition, Typologie und Entwicklung. Tübingen: Max Niemeyer Verlag.

Leech, Geoffrey, Marianne Hundt, Christian Mair & Nicholas Smith. 2009. Change in contemporary English. A grammatical study. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Steinhauer, Anja. 2000. Sprachökonomie durch Kurzwörter: Bildung und Verwendung in der Fachkommunikation. Tübingen: Narr.

Ström Herold, Jenny & Magnus Levin. In preparation. The Obama presidency, the Macintosh keyboard and the Norway fiasco. English proper noun modifiers in German and Swedish contrast. Paper presented at BICLCE, Vigo, September 2017.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tampere: University of Tampere, 2018
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74907 (URN)
Conference
ICAME 39, Tampere, 30 May – 3 June, 2018, Corpus Linguistics and Changing Society
Available from: 2018-06-03 Created: 2018-06-03 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
McConchie, R. & Tyrkkö, J. (Eds.). (2018). Historical Dictionaries in their Paratextual Context. Berlin and Boston: Mouton de Gruyter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Historical Dictionaries in their Paratextual Context
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Both dictionary and paratext research have emerged recently as widely-recognised research areas of intrinsic interest. This collection represents an attempt to place dictionaries within the paratextual context for the first time. This volume covers paratextual concerns, including dictionary production and use, questions concerning compilers, publishers, patrons and subscribers, and their cultural embedding generally. This book raises questions such as who compiled dictionaries and what cultural, linguistic and scientific notions drove this process. What influence did the professional interests, life experience, and social connexions of the lexicographer have? Who published dictionaries and why, and what do the forematter, backmatter, and supplements tell us? Lexicographers edited, adapted and improved earlier works, leaving copies with marginalia which illuminate working methods. Individual copies offer a history of ownership through marginalia, signatures, dates, places, and library stamps. Further questions concern how dictionaries were sold, who patronised them, subscribed to them, and how they came to various libraries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin and Boston: Mouton de Gruyter, 2018. p. 318
Series
Lexicographic Series Maior, ISSN 0175-9264 ; 153
Keywords
lexicography, paratext, dictionaries, book history
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Humanities, English; Humanities, Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77959 (URN)10.1515/9783110574975 (DOI)978-3-11-057286-5 (ISBN)978-3-11-057497-5 (ISBN)978-3-11-057296-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2019-02-18Bibliographically approved
McConchie, R. & Tyrkkö, J. (2018). Introduction. In: McConchie Roderick, Jukka Tyrkkö (Ed.), Historical Dictionaries in their Paratexual Context: (pp. vii-xii). Berlin & Boston: Mouton de Gruyter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2018 (English)In: Historical Dictionaries in their Paratexual Context / [ed] McConchie Roderick, Jukka Tyrkkö, Berlin & Boston: Mouton de Gruyter, 2018, p. vii-xiiChapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin & Boston: Mouton de Gruyter, 2018
Series
Lexicographic Series Maior, ISSN 0175-9264 ; 153
Keywords
lexicography, paratext, dictionaries
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Humanities, English; Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77963 (URN)10.1515/9783110574975-202 (DOI)978-3-11-057286-5 (ISBN)978-3-11-057497-5 (ISBN)978-3-11-057296-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2019-02-18Bibliographically approved
Tyrkkö, J. & Kopaczyk, J. (2018). Present applications and future directions of pattern-driven approaches in corpus linguistics. In: Joanna Kopaczyk, Jukka Tyrkkö (Ed.), Applications of Pattern-driven Methods in Corpus Linguistics: . Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Present applications and future directions of pattern-driven approaches in corpus linguistics
2018 (English)In: Applications of Pattern-driven Methods in Corpus Linguistics / [ed] Joanna Kopaczyk, Jukka Tyrkkö, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. -12Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018
Series
Studies in Corpus Linguistics, ISSN 1388-0373 ; 82
Keywords
corpus linguistics, methodology
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Humanities, Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71274 (URN)10.1075/scl.82.01tyr (DOI)978 90 272 0013 6 (ISBN)978 90 272 6456 5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-03-03 Created: 2018-03-03 Last updated: 2018-03-12Bibliographically approved
Alasuutari, P., Rautalin, M. & Tyrkkö, J. (2018). The Rise of the Idea of Model in Policymaking: The case of the British parliament, 1803-2005. European Journal of Sociology / Archives Européennes de Sociologie, 59(3), 341-363
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Rise of the Idea of Model in Policymaking: The case of the British parliament, 1803-2005
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Sociology / Archives Européennes de Sociologie, ISSN 0003-9756, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 341-363Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper addresses the question whether national decision-making has become increasingly interdependent in recent decades, and what role “world models” play in any such trend. These questions are scrutinised by utilising the “Historic Hansard” corpus, which contains all records of the UK Parliament from 1803 to 2005, complemented by other corpora. The results show that references to other countries were most frequent in parliamentary debates very early in the 19th century. However, allusions to other countries have evolved from referencing case examples to referencing policies that are constructed and branded as models. The idea of transferable models caught on particularly strongly from the 1950s onward. The other corpora used for the study confirmed that these changes reflect a global trend. Hence, the post-war era has witnessed a worldwide spread of the idea of model as a precondition for a global proliferation of named models.

Abstract [fr]

Cet article s’interroge sur l’interdépendance croissante du processus décisionnel national au cours des dernières décennies et sur le rôle joué par les « modèles mondiaux » dans une telle tendance. Ces questions sont examinées à l’aide du corpus « Historic Hansard », qui contient tous les documents du Parlement britannique de 1803 à 2005, complétés par d’autres corpus. Les résultats montrent que les références aux autres pays ont été les plus fréquentes dans les débats parlementaires au tout début du xixe siècle. Cependant, ces allusions changent progressivement de nature : là où elles renvoyaient initialement le plus souvent à des exemples singuliers, elles renvoient désormais à des politiques construites et étiquetées comme modèles. L’idée de modèles transférables de pays à pays s’est particulièrement développée à partir des années 1950. Les autres corpus utilisés dans l’étude confirment que ces changements reflètent une tendance globale. L’après-guerre a été témoin d’une diffusion mondiale de l’idée de modèle comme condition préalable à la dissémination mondiale de modèles désormais nommés.

Abstract [de]

Dieser Aufsatz hinterfragt sowohl die zunehmende Verflechtung nationaler Entscheidungsprozesse während der letzten Jahrzehnte als auch den Einfluss von ,,Welt-Modellen“ bei solchen Trends. Untersucht werden diese Fragen anhand der Sammlung « Historic Hansard », die alle Dokumente des britischen Parlaments zwischen 1803 und 2005 enthält, jeweils ergänzt durch andere Sammlungen. Die Ergebnisse belegen, dass in parlamentarischen Debatten am häufigsten zu Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts auf andere Länder verwiesen wurde. Diese Hinweise veränderten sich jedoch nach und nach in ihrer Art: hatten sie ursprünglich Beispielcharakter, wurden sie schließlich zu politischen Referenzen mit Modellcharakter. Ab 1950 fand die Vorstellung von übertragbaren Modellen besonderen Anklang. Die anderen, herangezogenen Sammlungen bestätigen, dass es sich um allgemeine Tendenzen handelt. Die Nachkriegszeit wurde zum Zeugen einer weltweiten Verbreitung der Modellidee als Voraussetzung für eine globale Vermehrung jener nun benannten Modelle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
sociology, policy, history, corpus linguistics
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80115 (URN)10.1017/S0003975618000164 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-31 Created: 2019-01-31 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
Nurmi, A., Tyrkkö, J., Petäjäniemi, A. & Pahta, P. (2018). The social and textual embedding of multilingual practices in Late Modern English: A corpus-based analysis. In: Päivi Pahta, Janne Skaffari, Laura Wright (Ed.), Multilingual Practices in Language History: English and Beyond (pp. 171-198). Mouton de Gruyter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The social and textual embedding of multilingual practices in Late Modern English: A corpus-based analysis
2018 (English)In: Multilingual Practices in Language History: English and Beyond / [ed] Päivi Pahta, Janne Skaffari, Laura Wright, Mouton de Gruyter, 2018, p. 171-198Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mouton de Gruyter, 2018
Series
Language contact and bilingualism, ISSN 2190-698X ; 15
Keywords
multilingualism, English, corpus linguistics, statistics, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Humanities, English; Humanities, Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69415 (URN)10.1515/9781501504945-009 (DOI)978-1-5015-1381-7 (ISBN)978-1-5015-0494-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
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