lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 56) Show all publications
Tillmar, M. (2018). Foreword: teaching entrepreneurship is walking a tightrope (1ed.). In: Karin Berglund & Karen Verduijn (Ed.), Revitalizing entrepreneurship education: adopting a critical approach in the classroom (pp. xiii-xiv). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foreword: teaching entrepreneurship is walking a tightrope
2018 (English)In: Revitalizing entrepreneurship education: adopting a critical approach in the classroom / [ed] Karin Berglund & Karen Verduijn, Routledge, 2018, 1, p. xiii-xivChapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Rethinking Entrepreneurship Research
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-74552 (URN)9781138213791 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-25 Created: 2018-05-25 Last updated: 2018-05-25Bibliographically approved
Ahl, H., Berglund, K., Pettersson, K., Sköld, B. & Tillmar, M. (2017). Entrepreneurship in rural areas:: The role of women?. In: : . Paper presented at 31st RENT Conference, Lund, 16-17 NOV 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrepreneurship in rural areas:: The role of women?
Show others...
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75895 (URN)
Conference
31st RENT Conference, Lund, 16-17 NOV 2017
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, K., Ahl, H., Berglund, K. & Tillmar, M. (2017). In the name of women?: Feminist readings of policies for women's entrepreneurship in Scandinavia. Scandinavian Journal of Management, 33(1), 50-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In the name of women?: Feminist readings of policies for women's entrepreneurship in Scandinavia
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 50-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Policy actors seeking to stimulate entrepreneurship sometimes give special attention to women. It is not given, however, that policy initiatives for women entrepreneurs necessarily contribute to gender equality, to social change for women - such as enhancing entrepreneurship as a means to women's wellbeing and financial or other independence - or to gendered change of society. We claim that the outcomes depend on the premises behind the policies. The purpose of this paper is to conduct an analysis of the feminist approaches that are taken in policies for women's entrepreneurship in the Scandinavian countries. We analyse how these policies argue for women's entrepreneurship, how they position women, and what assumptions they hold with respect to women and their businesses. We analyse and compare state-level polices that have been implemented by the national governments in three Scandinavian countries; Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, during the period 2005-2015. A comprehensive analytical tool, building on six different feminist theoretical approaches, is developed. We find that, even if a liberal feminist perspective is present, along with elements of other feminist approaches, polices give precedence to economic growth in a non-feminist fashion. Over time, economic growth becomes the key focus, while feminist approaches are silenced. We observe that, in the name of supporting women, the actual aim of policies for women entrepreneurs often seems to be economic growth, and women are seen merely as an untapped, and yet not fully adequate, resource. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Feminist approach, Women, Entrepreneurship policy, Scandinavia
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64201 (URN)10.1016/j.scaman.2017.01.002 (DOI)000397698700005 ()
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
Högberg, L. & Tillmar, M. (2017). Multisectoral organizing in the Swedish welfare system: Understanding the complexity. In: : . Paper presented at 33rd EGOS Colloquium: The Good Organization, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 6-8, 2017.. European Group of Organization Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multisectoral organizing in the Swedish welfare system: Understanding the complexity
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Group of Organization Studies, 2017
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75793 (URN)
Conference
33rd EGOS Colloquium: The Good Organization, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 6-8, 2017.
Note

Ej belagd 20180614

Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Högberg, L., Sköld, B. & Tillmar, M. (2017). The multilevel coevolution of (dis)trust and control in a high-trust welfare context: Cases from a Swedish customer-choice market. In: : . Paper presented at 33rd EGOS Colloquium: The Good Organization, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 6-8, 2017. European Group of Organization Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The multilevel coevolution of (dis)trust and control in a high-trust welfare context: Cases from a Swedish customer-choice market
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Group of Organization Studies, 2017
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75792 (URN)
Conference
33rd EGOS Colloquium: The Good Organization, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 6-8, 2017
Note

Ej belagd 20180614

Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Gawell, M., Sundin, E. & Tillmar, M. (2016). Entrepreneurship invited into the (social) welfare arena. In: Lundgaard Andersen, Linda;Gawell, Malin;Spear, Roger (Ed.), Social entrepreneurship and social enterprises: Nordic perspectives (pp. 215-231). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrepreneurship invited into the (social) welfare arena
2016 (English)In: Social entrepreneurship and social enterprises: Nordic perspectives / [ed] Lundgaard Andersen, Linda;Gawell, Malin;Spear, Roger, Routledge, 2016, p. 215-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Series
Routledge studies in social enterprise & social innovation ; 1
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75789 (URN)978-1-138-65626-0 (ISBN)978-1-317-22165-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-14Bibliographically approved
Ahl, H., Berglund, K., Pettersson, K. & Tillmar, M. (2016). From feminism to FemiInc.ism: On the uneasy relationship between feminism, entrepreneurship and the Nordic welfare state.. The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, 12(2), 369-392
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From feminism to FemiInc.ism: On the uneasy relationship between feminism, entrepreneurship and the Nordic welfare state.
2016 (English)In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 369-392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Feminism in the Nordic countries was primarily formulated in terms of ‘state feminism’. The women’s movement cooperated with feminist government officials and politicians, resulting in societies that can be considered to be the most gender-equal societies in the world. Historically, the state provided for a large publicly-financed welfare sector which made it possible for many women to combine work and family through the state’s implementation of family-friendly policies, while simultaneously providing employment opportunities for many women. However, since the financial crisis of the 1990s, there has been a political change influenced by neo-liberal thought, in which politicians have handed over the welfare state’s responsibilities to the market, and, instead, the politicians have encouraged entrepreneurship, not least among women. Further to this development, there has been a change in emphasis from entrepreneurship (understood as starting and running a business) to entrepreneurialism which, in addition to a belief in the efficacy of market forces, also contains a social dimension where individuals are supposed to be flexible and exercise choice. In this article, we ask whether this entails a change in the feminist project in the Nordic countries, and if so, what the likely consequences are for this project, both in practice and in research. In order to answer this question, we reviewed existing Nordic research on women’s entrepreneurship and examined how this body of work conceptualizes entrepreneurship, gender, the state, and equality. We also considered whether any trends could be identified. We relate our findings to recent changes in government policy and conclude that the current discourse on entrepreneurship challenges, and possibly weakens, state feminism, but we also conclude that this discourse may also provide space for new forms of feminist action, in market terms. We coin the term FemInc.ism to denote feminist action through enterprise and we discuss a number of important challenges that research on this phenomenon is faced with.

Keywords
Women’s entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship policy, Entrepreneurialism, Gender, State feminism, FemInc.ism
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64136 (URN)10.1007/s11365-014-0341-4 (DOI)000376095900003 ()
Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2017-05-22 Last updated: 2017-11-22Bibliographically approved
Tillmar, M. (2016). Gendering of commercial justice: experience of self-employed women in urban Tanzania. Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, 10(1), 101-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gendering of commercial justice: experience of self-employed women in urban Tanzania
2016 (English)In: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, ISSN 1750-6204, E-ISSN 1750-6212, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 101-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose– Women’s entrepreneurship is often seen as the solution of both economic growth and gender equality. This is despite academic knowledge of the gendered preconditions for entrepreneurship in many contexts. This paper aims to focus on the gendering of commercial justice, a precondition for entrepreneurship. Informed by gender perspectives on women’s entrepreneurship and previous studies on commercial justice in East Africa, this paper sets out to explore the experiences of urban women entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach– The paper is based on an interview study with women entrepreneurs and representatives of support organizations in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. The interviews were conducted in Kiswahili, and access was enabled through dialogues with local partner organizations such as the Tanzanian Chamber of Commerce.

Findings– Findings are that with formal legal rights, the informal institutions imply that the marital status of the women, and the attitude of their husbands, is the overarching determinants for the commercial justice perceived as available to them. This has implication for many policy areas, such as entrepreneurship support, women’s empowerment and labour market policy. Theoretically, the findings highlight the importance of studying the informal institutions affecting women’s entrepreneurship around the globe. Concerning commercial justice in particular, three dimensions of gendering are identified.

Research limitations/implications– The paper is based on a qualitative interview study. Further studies with varying methods are needed to further explore the gendering of commercial justice in Tanzania, East Africa and beyond.

Practical implications– A major practical implication of the study is the insight that business for development, will not automatically lead to business for equality, on a general level. The gender bias is also reproduced in everyday business life, for example, thorough access to commercial justice. Special measures to target the gender equality issue are, therefore, necessary. Another implication of the findings regard the importance of Alternative Dispute Resolution initiatives, affordable to women small and medium enterprise-owners.

Originality/value– While other obstacles to women’s entrepreneurship in the developing contexts have been well explored, the gendering of perceived commercial justice has not received sufficient attention in previous studies. Studies applying a gender theoretical perspective on entrepreneurship in the explored context are still needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016
Keywords
Gender, Entrepreneurship, Justice, East Africa, Development, Cooperation
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64090 (URN)10.1108/JEC-01-2016-0004 (DOI)
Projects
Gendering Commercial Justice
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilVINNOVA
Available from: 2017-05-21 Created: 2017-05-21 Last updated: 2017-06-01Bibliographically approved
Tillmar, M. (2016). Self-employed women's everyday innovations in East Africa (1ed.). In: Gry Agnete Alsos, Ulla Hytti & Elisabet Ljunggren (Ed.), Research handbook on gender and innovation: (pp. 91-106). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-employed women's everyday innovations in East Africa
2016 (English)In: Research handbook on gender and innovation / [ed] Gry Agnete Alsos, Ulla Hytti & Elisabet Ljunggren, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, 1, p. 91-106Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016 Edition: 1
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64092 (URN)178347811X (ISBN)9781783478118 (ISBN)
Projects
Gendering commercial justice
Funder
VINNOVASwedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-05-21 Created: 2017-05-21 Last updated: 2018-05-08Bibliographically approved
Tillmar, M. (2016). The gendered contextualization of SME cooperation in urban East Africa (1ed.). In: Christina Diaz-Garcia, Candida G. Brush, Elisabeth J. Gatewood & Friederike Welter (Ed.), Women's entrepreneurship in global and local context: (pp. 105-123). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The gendered contextualization of SME cooperation in urban East Africa
2016 (English)In: Women's entrepreneurship in global and local context / [ed] Christina Diaz-Garcia, Candida G. Brush, Elisabeth J. Gatewood & Friederike Welter, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, 1, p. 105-123Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016 Edition: 1
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64093 (URN)9781784717414 (ISBN)178471741X (ISBN)
Projects
Gendering Commerical Justice
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilVINNOVASida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2017-05-21 Created: 2017-05-21 Last updated: 2017-11-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0130-4407

Search in DiVA

Show all publications