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Franzén, Markus
Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Franzén, M., Forsman, A. & Betzholtz, P.-E. (2019). Variable color patterns influence continental range size and species-area relationships on islands. Ecosphere, 10(1), Article ID e02577.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variable color patterns influence continental range size and species-area relationships on islands
2019 (English)In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 10, no 1, article id e02577Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been hypothesized that species with more variable color patterns should have higher establishment success and be less sensitive to environmental changes and local extinction compared with species that do not vary in color. This difference in colonization/extinction balance should manifest as larger continental range distributions and modulate the species-area relationship on true islands. We evaluated these predictions using data for 1216 species of butterflies and moths that differed with regard to inter-individual variation in color pattern. We show that species with more variable color patterns have larger continental range sizes in Europe compared with non-variable species. We also provide rare evidence that the slope of the species-area relationship on islands is steeper for species having non-variable color patterns, suggesting that to preserve 60% of non-variable species would require an area twice as large compared to what would be needed to preserve 60% of variable species. Our findings suggest that combining information on ecological characteristics with presence/absence data from small and medium sized islands can help identify traits that drive species range patterns at the continental scale, and that individual variation in color pattern can be used as a proxy for ecological generalization and the ability to cope with environmental change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
butterflies, colonization, color pattern variation, extinction, insects, island biogeography, life history, moths, polymorphism, range expansion, species-area relationship, trait
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80281 (URN)10.1002/ecs2.2577 (DOI)000456857400033 ()
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
van Langevelde, F., Braamburg-Annegarn, M., Huigens, M. E., Groendijk, R., Poitevin, O., van Deijk, J. R., . . . WallisDeVries, M. F. (2018). Declines in moth populations stress the need for conserving dark nights. Global Change Biology, 24(3), 925-932
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Declines in moth populations stress the need for conserving dark nights
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2018 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 925-932Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Given the global continuous rise, artificial light at night is often considered a driving force behind moth population declines. Although negative effects on individuals have been shown, there is no evidence for effects on population sizes to date. Therefore, we compared population trends of Dutch macromoth fauna over the period 1985-2015 between moth species that differ in phototaxis and adult circadian rhythm. We found that moth species that show positive phototaxis or are nocturnally active have stronger negative population trends than species that are not attracted to light or are diurnal species. Our results indicate that artificial light at night is an important factor in explaining declines in moth populations in regions with high artificial night sky brightness. Our study supports efforts to reduce the impacts of artificial light at night by promoting lamps that do not attract insects and reduce overall levels of illumination in rural areas to reverse declines of moth populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
artificial light at night, ecological traits, ecology of the night, Lepidoptera, light pollution, phototaxis
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71442 (URN)10.1111/gcb.14008 (DOI)000425396700007 ()29215778 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Gerard, M., Vanderplanck, M., Franzén, M., Kuhlmann, M., Potts, S. G., Rasmont, P., . . . Michez, D. (2018). Patterns of size variation in bees at a continental scale: does Bergmann's rule apply?. Oikos, 127(8), 1095-1103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of size variation in bees at a continental scale: does Bergmann's rule apply?
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2018 (English)In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 127, no 8, p. 1095-1103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Body size latitudinal clines have been widley explained by the Bergmann's rule in homeothermic vertebrates. However, there is no general consensus in poikilotherms organisms in particular in insects that represent the large majority of wildlife. Among them, bees are a highly diverse pollinators group with high economic and ecological value. Nevertheless, no comprehensive studies of species assemblages at a phylogenetically larger scale have been carried out even if they could identify the traits and the ecological conditions that generate different patterns of latitudinal size variation. We aimed to test Bergmann's rule for wild bees by assessing relationships between body size and latitude at continental and community levels. We tested our hypotheses for bees showing different life history traits (i.e. sociality and nesting behaviour). We used 142 008 distribution records of 615 bee species at 50 x 50 km (CGRS) grids across the West Palearctic. We then applied generalized least squares fitted linear model (GLS) to assess the relationship between latitude and mean body size of bees, taking into account spatial autocorrelation. For all bee species grouped, mean body size increased with higher latitudes, and so followed Bergmann's rule. However, considering bee genera separately, four genera were consistent with Bergmann's rule, while three showed a converse trend, and three showed no significant cline. All life history traits used here (i.e. solitary, social and parasitic behaviour; ground and stem nesting behaviour) displayed a Bergmann's cline. In general there is a main trend for larger bees in colder habitats, which is likely to be related to their thermoregulatory abilities and partial endothermy, even if a 'season length effect' (i.e. shorter foraging season) is a potential driver of the converse Bergmann's cline particularly in bumblebees.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
Bergmann's rule, body size, latitudinal clines, life history traits, thermo-regulation, wild bees
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77380 (URN)10.1111/oik.05260 (DOI)000440305800003 ()
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-30 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
Sattler, C., Schrader, J., Farkas, V. M., Settele, J. & Franzén, M. (2018). Pesticide diversity in rice growing areas of Northern Vietnam. Paddy and Water Environment, 16(2), 339-352
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pesticide diversity in rice growing areas of Northern Vietnam
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2018 (English)In: Paddy and Water Environment, ISSN 1611-2490, E-ISSN 1611-2504, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 339-352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pesticide use in developing countries increases rapidly. In many regions, we miss knowledge of how frequently pesticides are applied and which active ingredients are used. We present a new cost-efficient and rapid assessment method of recording pesticides diversity in rice-dominated landscapes and present some evidence of the misuse of active ingredients in our study regions. We investigated 17 rice fields in two regions of Northern Vietnam in 2014 and 2015. At each region, we explore the abundance of pesticides used with three methods including (1) the novel approach of collecting pesticide packages close to our target rice fields, (2) observations of farmers spraying pesticides in the surrounding and (3) interviewing local farmers. By collecting pesticide packages, we found 811 packages containing 74 different active ingredients. On average, 19 active ingredients (ranging from four to 40 active ingredients) were applied with an average content of 275.3 g of active ingredients per site. Insecticide packages (39%) were most abundant followed by those of fungicides (31%), herbicides (16%) and other active ingredients (14%). On all sites, active ingredients banned in the European Union were applied by the farmers. Collecting pesticide packages proved to be an efficient and rapidly implemented method to obtain some baseline information about pesticide application (for Northern Vietnam). We suspect that improved agricultural extension services could contribute to good agricultural practices in pest management. Generally, better information and education for local farmers for appropriate use of pesticides seem a necessity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Agrochemicals, Agroecosystem insecticides, Active ingredients, Red River Delta, Rice fields
National Category
Agricultural Science Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77411 (URN)10.1007/s10333-018-0637-z (DOI)000439341800009 ()
Available from: 2018-08-29 Created: 2018-08-29 Last updated: 2018-08-29Bibliographically approved
Settele, J., Heong, K. L., Kuehn, I., Klotz, S., Spangenberg, J. H., Arida, G., . . . Wiemers, M. (2018). Rice ecosystem services in South-east Asia. Paddy and Water Environment, 16(2), 211-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rice ecosystem services in South-east Asia
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2018 (English)In: Paddy and Water Environment, ISSN 1611-2490, E-ISSN 1611-2504, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 211-224Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Agricultural Science
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77409 (URN)10.1007/s10333-018-0656-9 (DOI)000439341800001 ()
Available from: 2018-08-29 Created: 2018-08-29 Last updated: 2018-08-29Bibliographically approved
Schrader, J., Franzén, M., Sattler, C., Ferderer, P. & Wetsphal, C. (2018). Woody habitats promote pollinators and complexity of plant–pollinator interactions in homegardens located in rice terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras. Paddy and Water Environment, 16(2), 253-263
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Woody habitats promote pollinators and complexity of plant–pollinator interactions in homegardens located in rice terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras
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2018 (English)In: Paddy and Water Environment, ISSN 1611-2490, E-ISSN 1611-2504, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 253-263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bees are important pollinators of wild plants and crops, but little is known about bee habitat requirements and pollinator management in tropical mountainous agricultural regions. Here, smallholder farmers produce fruits and vegetables in homegardens that depend upon or benefit from bee pollination. We hypothesized that abundance and richness of wild and domesticated bees and the complexity of plant–pollinator interactions are higher in homegardens surrounded by woody habitats than in homegardens found farther from woodlands. Bees were sampled in 20 homegardens in the rice terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras. We used linear mixed effect models to analyse effects of woody habitats around homegardens on bee richness and abundance. Based on pooled observations for each garden category, we built pollinator–plant interactions networks to illustrate shifts in interaction frequencies. We recorded 354 bee individuals of 13 wild and one domesticated bee species (Apis cerana). Wild bee richness was significantly higher in homegardens surrounded by woody habitats. Bee abundance increased significantly with increasing flower cover. Wild bees visited cultivated plants significantly more often than domesticated bees. Six vegetable species and 76% of all flower visits on cultivated plants in total were performed by wild bees and three plant species and 24% by domesticated bees. Pollinator–plant networks were more complex in homegardens surrounded by woody habitats. We conclude that woody habitats increase abundance and richness of wild and domesticated bees. Increasing availability of floral resources also promotes bee abundance. In order to promote pollination services in the landscape mosaic of smallholder rice farms, woody habitats and forest fragments together with numerous floral resources should be protected and restored.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Philippines, Wild bees, Domesticated bees, Woody habitats, Flower cover, Biodiversity hotspot
National Category
Other Natural Sciences Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67753 (URN)10.1007/s10333-017-0612-0 (DOI)000439341800004 ()
Note

Correction published in: Paddy and Water Environment, January 2018, Volume 16, Issue 1, pp 207–207

Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Aguirre-Gutierrez, J., WallisDeVries, M. F., Marshall, L., van't Zelfde, M., Villalobos-Arambula, A. R., Boekelo, B., . . . Biesmeijer, J. C. (2017). Butterflies show different functional and species diversity in relationship to vegetation structure and land use. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 26(10), 1126-1137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Butterflies show different functional and species diversity in relationship to vegetation structure and land use
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2017 (English)In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1126-1137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimBiodiversity is rapidly disappearing at local and global scales also affecting the functional diversity of ecosystems. We aimed to assess whether functional diversity was correlated with species diversity and whether both were affected by similar land use and vegetation structure drivers. Better understanding of these relationships will allow us to improve our predictions regarding the effects of future changes in land use on ecosystem functions and services. LocationThe Netherlands. MethodsWe compiled a dataset of c.3 million observations of 66 out of 106 known Dutch butterfly species collected across 6,075 sampling locations during a period of 7 years, together with very high-resolution maps of land use and countrywide vegetation structure data. Using a mixed-effects modelling framework, we investigated the relationship between functional and species diversity and their main land use and vegetation structure drivers. ResultsWe found that high species diversity does not translate into high functional diversity, as shown by their different spatial distribution patterns in the landscape. Functional and species diversity are mainly driven by different sets of structural and land use parameters (especially average vegetation height, amount of vegetation between 0.5 and 2m, natural grassland, sandy soils vegetation, marsh vegetation and urban areas). We showed that it is a combination of both vegetation structural characteristics and land use variables that defines functional and species diversity. Main conclusionsFunctional diversity and species diversity of butterflies are not consistently correlated and must therefore be treated separately. High functional diversity levels occurred even in areas with low species diversity. Thus, conservation actions may differ depending on whether the focus is on conservation of high functional diversity or high species diversity. A more integrative analysis of biodiversity at both species and trait levels is needed to infer the full effects of environmental change on ecosystem functioning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
functional diversity, landscape composition, LiDAR, pollinators, response traits, species diversity, vegetation structure
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68142 (URN)10.1111/geb.12622 (DOI)000411041600005 ()
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
Franzén, M., Schrader, J. & Sjöberg, G. (2017). Butterfly diversity and seasonality of Ta Phin mountain area (N. Vietnam, Lao Cai province). Journal of Insect Conservation, 21(3), 465-475
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Butterfly diversity and seasonality of Ta Phin mountain area (N. Vietnam, Lao Cai province)
2017 (English)In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 465-475Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human pressures on the environment are changing spatially and temporally, with profound implications for the planet's biodiversity. Butterflies are important indicators for environmental change and are a suitable group to detect areas of high conservation concern and prioritize conservation efforts. To obtain data to support urgently-needed conservation measures, we surveyed the butterfly fauna in a mountainous region of northern Vietnam, using transect counts over 8 months (121 survey days) from June 2014 to April 2015. In total, we recorded > 26,000 butterflies belonging to 231 species, including at least two species new to Vietnam, three red-listed and protected species listed by CITES. Most species were rare: we recorded members of 100 species ae<currency>5 times and 52 species just once. Males dominated the sample, accounting for 81% of all observed butterflies and all members of 84 observed species. Species richness and abundance were highest in July, and there were surprisingly large changes in species composition between months. Species richness curves reached saturation, indicating that we detected most species present in the area, except for members of two families (Lycaenidae and Hesperiidae). Our results highlight the importance of thorough studies using standardized methods, capable of detecting most species in an area, over a whole season. There are urgent needs to integrate butterflies into conservation programs and use their potential as indicator species of habitat degradation and land use intensity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Conservation, Environmental change, Disturbance, Monitoring, Montane forest
National Category
Zoology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67048 (URN)10.1007/s10841-017-9985-z (DOI)000404178700010 ()
Available from: 2017-07-20 Created: 2017-07-20 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
Betzholtz, P.-E., Franzén, M. & Forsman, A. (2017). Colour pattern variation can inform about extinction risk in moths. Animal Conservation, 20(1), 72-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Colour pattern variation can inform about extinction risk in moths
2017 (English)In: Animal Conservation, ISSN 1367-9430, E-ISSN 1469-1795, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 72-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Theory posits that species with inter-individual variation in colour patterns should beless vulnerable to extinction, compared with species that do not vary in colour. Toevaluate this prediction, we explored whether differences in colour pattern diversitywas associated with extinction risk, using red-list status for more than 350 species ofnoctuid moths in Sweden. We also evaluated six other species characteristics thathave been proposed to influence extinction risk namely: host plant niche breadth,habitat type, area of occupancy, body size, overwintering life-history stage and lengthof flight activity period. We found that species with variable colour patterns hadreduced extinction risk overall compared with species having non-variable colourpatterns, and that this difference was pronounced more strongly among species havingsmaller areas of occupancy. There were also significant associations with hostplant niche breadth and habitat type, extinction risk being lower on average in polyphagousspecies and in generalist species that occupied different habitat types. Thesefindings represent the first evidence for insects that variable colouration is associatedwith reduced extinction risks. Information on colour pattern variation is readily availablefor many taxa and may be used as a cost-effective proxy for endangerment inthe work of halting national and global biodiversity loss.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
colour variation; extinction risk; red list; lepidoptera; moth; threat status; trait; niche breath.
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-57817 (URN)10.1111/acv.12287 (DOI)000396047900012 ()
Available from: 2016-11-04 Created: 2016-11-04 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
Johansson, V., Knape, J. & Franzén, M. (2017). Population dynamics and future persistence of the clouded Apollo butterfly in southern Scandinavia: The importance of low intensity grazing and creation of habitat patches. Biological Conservation, 206, 120-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population dynamics and future persistence of the clouded Apollo butterfly in southern Scandinavia: The importance of low intensity grazing and creation of habitat patches
2017 (English)In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 206, p. 120-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated the population dynamics and future persistence of the last remaining Clouded Apollo butterfly metapopulation in southern Scandinavia. Based on three decades of surveys (1984-2015), we modelled colonization-extinction dynamics and local population sizes using habitat patch characteristics and connectivity, while accounting for imperfect detection and uncertainty in the local population sizes. The colonization probability increased with increasing connectivity and the local extinction probability decreased with increasing local population size in accordance with metapopulation theory. The local population size increased with increasing patch area, and was also affected by grazing intensity. Light grazing resulted in larger local populations compared to heavy grazing or no grazing at all. The butterfly population has decreased considerably during the study period and according to projections of future dynamics the estimated extinction risk within the coming 10 years is 17%. However, it is possible to change the negative trends and decrease the extinction risk considerably by conservation actions. By optimizing the grazing pressure in existing patches the extinction risk was reduced to 11% (a reduction with 35% compared to the scenario with no conservation action). If a few new patches are created close to the occupied ones the extinction risk can be reduced further. In conclusion, there is a large risk that the Clouded Apollo butterfly will go extinct from southern Scandinavia within the coming decade. However, conservation measures that are focused to the core area of the current distribution and applied soon can considerably improve the situation for the butterfly. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Colonization, Extinction, Habitat quality, Insects, Metapopulation, Population viability, Restoration
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-64225 (URN)10.1016/j.biocon.2016.12.029 (DOI)000394065900016 ()
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
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