lnu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Fagerström, Cecilia, Professor
Biography [swe]

livsvillkor, hälsa och livskvalitet bland äldre. Ehälsolösningar i samband med kroniska sjukdomar. Personcentrerad vård

 

Publications (10 of 83) Show all publications
Garcia, D., Jedel, I., Molander-Söderholm, K., Lindskär, E., Fagerström, C., Rapp-Ricciardi, M. & Sikström, S. (2019). Creative Utterances about Person-Centered Care among Future Health Care Professionals are Related to Reward Dependence rather than to a Creative Personality Profile. Heliyon, 5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creative Utterances about Person-Centered Care among Future Health Care Professionals are Related to Reward Dependence rather than to a Creative Personality Profile
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Heliyon, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81961 (URN)10.1016/j.heliyon.2019. e01389 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-14 Created: 2019-04-14 Last updated: 2019-04-14
Garcia, D., Cloninger, K., Molander-Söderhölm, K., Carleheden-Ottosson, L., Jönsson, I., Wåhlin, A., . . . Fagerström, C. (2019). Person-Centered Care.. In: V. Zeigler-Hill & T. Shackelford (Eds.) (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences: (pp. 1-7). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Person-Centered Care.
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences / [ed] V. Zeigler-Hill & T. Shackelford (Eds.), Springer, 2019, p. 1-7Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81721 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-06 Created: 2019-04-06 Last updated: 2019-04-06
Bratt, A. S. & Fagerström, C. (2019). Self-compassion in old age: confirmatory factor analysis of the 6-factor model and the internal consistency of the Self-compassion scale-short form. Aging & Mental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-compassion in old age: confirmatory factor analysis of the 6-factor model and the internal consistency of the Self-compassion scale-short form
2019 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Self-compassion is a psychological construct associated with self-acceptance and coping with the aging process. The Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), in both long and short forms, is the most widely used measure of self-compassion. Studies on the psychometric properties of the short form (SCS-SF) are scarce. The aim of this study was to translate into Swedish and test the psychometric properties of the SCS-SF. Another aim was to investigate whether self-compassion differs by age and gender in older adults.

Method: We tested the Swedish SCS-SF in a sample of 594 randomly selected older adults, aged 66 to 102 years, for internal consistency, construct validity, and factor structure.

Results: The results showed the SCS-SF had acceptable internal consistency in the total sample (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.68) and somewhat higher (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.76) in the youngest old (age 66 years). The six-factor structure found in the original study was not observed in confirmatory factor analyses in our older sample. Exploratory factor analyses showed that a two-factor solution, formed by the positive and negative components had the best fit; however, only the negative component had good internal consistency.

Conclusion: Overall, the SCS-SF seemed to have insufficient reliability in this sample of older adults and further studies are needed to see whether new instruments are needed for this population. Self-compassion was generally higher in men than women, but did not differ by age in this sample of older adults.

Keywords
Self-Compassion Scale – Short Form, older adults, psychometric properties
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80880 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2019.1569588 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-28 Created: 2019-02-28 Last updated: 2019-03-05
Wickström, H. L., Oien, R. F., Fagerström, C., Anderberg, P., Jakobsson, U. & Midlov, P. J. (2018). Comparing video consultation with inperson assessment for Swedish patients with hard-to-heal ulcers: registry-based studies of healing time and of waiting time. BMJ Open, 8(2), Article ID e017623.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing video consultation with inperson assessment for Swedish patients with hard-to-heal ulcers: registry-based studies of healing time and of waiting time
Show others...
2018 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 2, article id e017623Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives To investigate differences in ulcer healing time and waiting time between video consultation and inperson assessment for patients with hard-to-heal ulcers. Setting Patients treated at Blekinge Wound Healing Centre, a primary care centre covering the whole of Blekinge county (150 000 inhabitants), were compared with patients registered and treated according to the Registry of Ulcer Treatment, a Swedish national web-based quality registry. Participants In the study for analysing ulcer healing time, the study group consisted of 100 patients diagnosed through video consultation between October 2014 and September 2016. The control group for analysing healing time consisted of 1888 patients diagnosed through inperson assessment during the same period. In the study for analysing waiting time, the same study group (n=100) was compared with 100 patients diagnosed through inperson assessment. Primary and secondary outcome measures Differences in ulcer healing time were analysed using the log-rank test. Differences in waiting time were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results Median healing time was 59 days (95% CI 40 to 78) in the study group and 82 days (95% CI 75 to 89) in the control group (P<0.001). Median waiting time was 25 days (range: 1-83 days) in the study group and 32 days (range: 3-294 days) for patients diagnosed through inperson assessment (P=0.017). There were no significant differences between the study group and the control group regarding age, gender or ulcer size. Conclusions Healing time and waiting time were significantly shorter for patients diagnosed through video consultation compared with those diagnosed through inperson assessment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76895 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017623 (DOI)000433129800102 ()29449288 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-07-17 Created: 2018-07-17 Last updated: 2018-07-17Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L. & Fagerström, C. (2018). Decision-makers and mediators in a home healthcare digitisation process: nurses' experiences of implementation and use of a decision support system. Contemporary Nurse: health care across the lifespan, 54(4-5), 511-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision-makers and mediators in a home healthcare digitisation process: nurses' experiences of implementation and use of a decision support system
2018 (English)In: Contemporary Nurse: health care across the lifespan, ISSN 1037-6178, E-ISSN 1839-3535, Vol. 54, no 4-5, p. 511-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This study focuses on a decision support system (DSS) for home healthcare and the implementation of it.Aim: To describe home healthcare nurses' experiences of the implementation and use of a new DSS, with a focus on how it influences decision making in everyday work practice.Design: A qualitative research design.Methods: Data was collected through three focus group interviews with six home healthcare nurses.The data analysis was drawn from Burnard's method for content analysis.Results: The DSS was experienced as bringing support to decisions, but sometimes incompatible with home healthcare nurses' work practice. Professional understanding and the DSS were sometimes experienced as parallel support systems not assisting work across healthcare organisations.Conclusion: When a DSS is used to transform work of healthcare organisations several aspects should be highlighted. If the organisation does not consider these aspects, nurses may adopt a role as mediator in the implementation process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
decision support system, health care services, home care services, implementation, nursing care
National Category
Nursing Computer and Information Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Health Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79190 (URN)10.1080/10376178.2018.1507676 (DOI)000451525700014 ()30099935 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Kumlien, C., Miller, M., Fagerström, C. & Hagell, P. (2018). Evaluation of self-management program outcomes: Adaptation and testing of a Swedish version of the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ). Journal of applied measurement., 19(3), 303-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of self-management program outcomes: Adaptation and testing of a Swedish version of the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ)
2018 (English)In: Journal of applied measurement., Vol. 19, no 3, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81720 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-06 Created: 2019-04-06 Last updated: 2019-04-06
Naseer, M., Dahlberg, L. & Fagerström, C. (2018). Health related quality of life and emergency department visits in adults of age >= 66 years: a prospective cohort study. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 16, Article ID 14.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health related quality of life and emergency department visits in adults of age >= 66 years: a prospective cohort study
2018 (English)In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 16, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Age increases the risk of emergency department [ED] visits. Health related quality of life (HRQoL) is often estimated as an outcome of ED visits, but it can be a risk factor of ED visits. This study aims to assess the association of HRQoL with time to first ED visit and/or frequent ED use in older adults during four-year period and if this association differs in 66-80 and 80+ age groups. Methods: Data from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care-Blekinge of wave 2007-2009 was used in combination with electronic health records on ED visits. The analytical sample included 673 participants of age 66 years and older with information on HRQoL. Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess the association between HRQoL and time to first ED visit. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the association of HRQoL with frequent ED use. Results: During the study period, 55.3% of older adults visited the ED and 28.8% had a frequent ED use. Poor physical HRQoL was independently associated with first ED visit both in total sample (p < 0.001) and in 66-80 (p < 0. 001) and 80+ (p = 0.038) age groups. Poor mental HRQoL had no significant association with first ED visit and frequent ED use. Conclusion: Findings suggest that poor physical HRQoL is associated with time to first ED visit in older adults. Therefore, physical HRQoL should be considered while planning interventions on the reduction of ED utilisation in older adults. Explanatory factors of frequent ED use may differ in age groups. Further studies are needed to identify associated factors of frequent ED visits in 80+ group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Quality of life, Subjective health, Older adults, Care utilisation, Emergency visit
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77395 (URN)10.1186/s12955-018-0967-y (DOI)000439735900001 ()30041629 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-29 Created: 2018-08-29 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Tuvesson, H., Hellström, A., Sjöberg, L., Sjölund, B.-M., Nordell, E. & Fagerström, C. (2018). Life weariness and suicidal thoughts in late life: a national study in Sweden. Aging & Mental Health, 22(10), 1365-1371
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life weariness and suicidal thoughts in late life: a national study in Sweden
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1365-1371Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: This study aimed at investigating the point prevalence of life weariness and suicidal thoughts and their relationship with socio-demographic characteristics in a population of older adults in Sweden. Method: Data from 7913 individuals aged 60 years and older were drawn from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care, a collaborative study in Sweden. Life weariness and suicidal thoughts were measured by one item derived from the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. A multinomial regression model was used to investigate the relationships of socio-demographic characteristics with life weariness and suicidal thoughts. Results: Living in urban and semi-urban areas, being of advanced age, being divorced and having lower educational levels were related to life weariness. Living in a residential care facility, being widowed or unmarried, being born in a non-Nordic European country and experiencing financial difficulties were related to both life weariness and suicidal thoughts. Sex was found to be unrelated to either life weariness or suicidal thoughts. Conclusion: This study found that several socio-demographic variables were associated with life weariness and suicidal thoughts among older adults. Specific attention to older individuals with these characteristics may be warranted as they might be more vulnerable to life weariness and suicidal thoughts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Life weariness, National study, Older adults, Socio-demographics, Suicidal thoughts
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68201 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2017.1348484 (DOI)000455491500017 ()28685600 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021985390 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-17 Created: 2017-10-04 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, C., Fagerström, C. & Willman, A. (2018). Patient autonomy in a high-tech care context: A theoretical framework. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(21-22), 4128-4140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient autonomy in a high-tech care context: A theoretical framework
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 21-22, p. 4128-4140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectivesTo synthesise and interpret previous findings with the aim of developing a theoretical framework for patient autonomy in a high-tech care context. BackgroundPutting the somewhat abstract concept of patient autonomy into practice can prove difficult as when it is highlighted in healthcare literature, the patient perspective is often invisible. Autonomy presumes that a person has experience, education, self-discipline and decision-making capacity. Reference to autonomy in relation to patients in high-tech care environments could therefore be considered paradoxical, as in most cases, these persons are vulnerable, with impaired physical and/or metacognitive capacity, thus making extended knowledge of patient autonomy for these persons even more important. DesignTheory development. MethodsThe basic approaches in theory development by Walker and Avant were used to create a theoretical framework through an amalgamation of the results from three qualitative studies conducted previously by the same research group. ResultsA theoretical frameworkthe control-partnership-transition frameworkwas delineated disclosing different parts cocreating the prerequisites for patient autonomy in high-tech care environments. Assumptions and propositional statements that guide theory development were also outlined, as were guiding principles for use in day-to-day nursing care. Four strategies used by patients were revealed as follows: the strategy of control, the strategy of partnership, the strategy of trust and the strategy of transition. ConclusionsAn extended knowledge base, founded on theoretical reasoning about patient autonomy, could facilitate nursing care that would allow people to remain/become autonomous in the role of patient in high-tech care environments. Relevance to clinical practiceThe control-partnership-transition framework would be of help in supporting and defending patient autonomy when caring for individual patients, as it provides an understanding of the strategies employed by patients to achieve autonomy in high-tech care contexts. The guiding principles for patient autonomy presented could be used in nursing guidelines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
autonomy, caring, concept development, high-tech care, metasynthesis, theory development
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78605 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14562 (DOI)000446561500030 ()29893468 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Fagerström, C., Elmståhl, S. & Sandin Wranker, L. (2017). A gender perspective on factors affecting quality of life when being a caregiver in old age: findings from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care (SNAC) study. In: : . Paper presented at European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS), Nice, France, September 20-22, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A gender perspective on factors affecting quality of life when being a caregiver in old age: findings from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care (SNAC) study
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing; Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing; Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72346 (URN)
Conference
European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS), Nice, France, September 20-22, 2017
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications