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Fagerström, Cecilia, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4257-282X
Biography [swe]

livsvillkor, hälsa och livskvalitet bland äldre. Ehälsolösningar i samband med kroniska sjukdomar. Personcentrerad vård

 

Publications (10 of 116) Show all publications
Rosenburg, M., Tuvesson, H., Lindqvist, G., Brudin, L. & Fagerström, C. (2024). Associations between self-care advice and healing time in patients with venous leg ulcer – a Swedish registry-based study. BMC Geriatrics, 24(1), Article ID 124.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between self-care advice and healing time in patients with venous leg ulcer – a Swedish registry-based study
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2024 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Venous leg ulcers take time to heal. It is advocated that physical activity plays a role in healing, and so does the patient’s nutritional status. Additionally, malnutrition influences the inflammatory processes, which extends the healing time. Therefore, the staff’s advising role is important for patient outcomes. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the associations between given self-care advice and healing time in patients with venous leg ulcers while controlling for demographic and ulcer-related factors.

Methods The sample consisted of patients registered in the Registry of Ulcer Treatment (RUT) which includes patient and ulcer-related and healing variables. The data was analyzed with descriptive statistics. Logistic regression models were performed to investigate the influence of self-care advice on healing time.

Results No associations between shorter healing time (less than 70 days) and the staff´s self-care advice on physical activity was identified, whilst pain (OR 1.90, CI 1.32–2.42, p < 0.001) and giving of nutrition advice (OR 1.55, CI 1.12–2.15, p = 0.009) showed an association with longer healing time.

Conclusions Neither self-care advice on nutrition and/or physical activity indicated to have a positive association with shorter healing time. However, information and counseling might not be enough. We emphasize the importance of continuously and systematically following up given advice throughout ulcer management, not only when having complicated ulcers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2024
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127439 (URN)10.1186/s12877-024-04660-8 (DOI)001155895500003 ()2-s2.0-85183682041 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Linnaeus University
Available from: 2024-02-02 Created: 2024-02-02 Last updated: 2024-02-20Bibliographically approved
Niklasson, J., Fagerström, C., Backåberg, S., Lindberg, T. & Bergman, P. (2024). Daily activity patterns in older adults receiving initial support: the association between daily steps and sitting in bouts of at least 60 min. BMC Geriatrics, 24(1), Article ID 88.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Daily activity patterns in older adults receiving initial support: the association between daily steps and sitting in bouts of at least 60 min
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2024 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Aging has a significant impact on health, underlining the importance of maintaining physical function and reducing time spent sitting among older adults. To understand how to reduce prolonged sitting or increase physical activity, factors related to the daily living and observed daily activity patterns should be explored. This study aimed to investigate the association between daily steps, self-rated health, physical activity, sedentary behavior, motivation to exercise and fear of falling among older adults receiving initial support.

Method

Cross-sectional design with total population questionnaire data from adults aged ≥ 60 years (n = 917), living at home with initial support from municipal care in southern Sweden. The older adults were offered to participate in a follow-up study measuring daily activity patterns with accelerometers (n = 72). Linear regression was used to analyze associations between daily steps and possible predictors.

Results

The linear model (

0.478) showed that sitting in unbroken bouts of > 60 min (β = -0.313, p < 0.05), walking independently outdoors (β = 0.301, p < 0.05), intending to increase physical activity (β = -0.294, p < 0.05), sex (β = 0.279, p < 0.05), relative autonomy index (β = 0.258, p < 0.05), fear of falling (β = -0.238, p < 0.05), and self-rated health (β = 0.213, p < 0.05) predicted daily steps.

Conclusion

The model of predictors brings new understanding regarding daily steps among community-dwelling older adults. The association between sitting in bouts of > 60 min and daily steps is interesting as 35% of participants had a number of sitting bouts that on average, showed 30% less steps taken. Minimizing long sitting bouts and maintaining physical functioning to promote independence when walking outdoors can be tools for clinical practitioners devising interventions to break prolonged sitting among community-dwelling older adults. Future research should prioritize studying older adults’ outdoor walking independence, including its relation to walking with or without assistive devices and its impact on physical activity and sedentary behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2024
Keywords
Accelerometer Aging Physical activity Sedentary behavior Sitting Walking independence
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127281 (URN)10.1186/s12877-024-04681-3 (DOI)001148301500001 ()2-s2.0-85182847415 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Linnaeus University
Available from: 2024-01-30 Created: 2024-01-30 Last updated: 2024-02-14Bibliographically approved
Niklasson, J., Backåberg, S., Lindberg, T., Bergman, P. & Fagerström, C. (2024). Embodied navigation: the influence of lived experience on physical activity and sedentary behavior among older adults. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 19(1), Article ID 2313657.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embodied navigation: the influence of lived experience on physical activity and sedentary behavior among older adults
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2024 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 2313657Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PurposeThe impact of a sedentary lifestyle on health and well-being is well recognized. However, there is limited understanding of how a lifetime of physical activity and sedentary behaviour influences an active lifestyle in older adults. The aim of this study was to describe how lived experience of physical activity and sedentary behaviour impacts daily activities among older adults, from a life course perspective.MethodsQualitative content analysis was used; individual telephone interviews were conducted with fourteen older adults aged 71 to 92 years. The participants received initial support from community care and lived in ordinary housing in southern Sweden.ResultsThe interviews yielded one theme, “Navigating with an embodied activity compass,” and two sub-themes: “Being guided by the past” and “Unveiling pathways through body awareness.”ConclusionsOur study highlights how older adults’ lived experiences of physical activity, with their connections to body awareness and acceptance, impact daily physical activity. These findings offer new knowledge for clinical practitioners balancing recommendations of sedentary behaviour and physical activity, to promote healthy daily physical activity among older adults. Future research and policies should consider the lived experiences of older adults when addressing public health matters related to sedentary behaviour and physical activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2024
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing; Medicine, Gerontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127765 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2024.2313657 (DOI)001161297400001 ()
Funder
Linnaeus University
Available from: 2024-02-14 Created: 2024-02-14 Last updated: 2024-02-23Bibliographically approved
Ljungholm, L., Årestedt, K., Fagerström, C., Djukanovic, I. & Ekstedt, M. (2024). Measuring patients' experiences of continuity of care in a primary care context - Development and evaluation of a patient-reported experience measure. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 80(1), 387-398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring patients' experiences of continuity of care in a primary care context - Development and evaluation of a patient-reported experience measure
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 387-398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundContinuity of care is viewed as a hallmark of high-quality care in the primary care context. Measures to evaluate the quality of provider performance are scarce, and it is unclear how the assessments correlate with patients' experiences of care as coherent and interconnected over time, consistent with their preferences and care needs.AimTo develop and evaluate a patient-reported experience measure of continuity of care in primary care for patients with complex care needs.MethodThe study was conducted in two stages: (1) development of the instrument based on theory and empirical studies and reviewed for content validity (16 patients with complex care needs and 8 experts) and (2) psychometric evaluation regarding factor structure, test-retest reliability, internal consistency reliability, and convergent validity. In all, 324 patients participated in the psychometric evaluation.ResultsThe Patient Experienced Continuity of care Questionnaire (PECQ) contains 20 items clustered in four dimensions of continuity of care measuring Information (four items), Relation (six items), Management (five items), and Knowledge (five items). Overall, the hypothesized factor structure was indicated. The PECQ also showed satisfactory convergent validity, internal consistency, and stability.Conclusion/ImplicationsThe PECQ is a multidimensional patient experience instrument that can provide information on various dimensions useful for driving quality improvement strategies in the primary care context for patients with complex care needs.Patient or Public ContributionPatients have participated in the content validation of the items.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
classic test theory, complex care needs, continuity of care, instrument development, primary healthcare, psychometric evaluation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123645 (URN)10.1111/jan.15792 (DOI)001034667700001 ()37485735 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165453712 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-14 Created: 2023-08-14 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
Lincke, A., Fagerström, C., Ekstedt, M., Löwe, W. & Backåberg, S. (2023). A comparative study of the 2D- and 3D-based skeleton avatar technology for assessing physical activity and functioning among healthy older adults. Health Informatics Journal, 29(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparative study of the 2D- and 3D-based skeleton avatar technology for assessing physical activity and functioning among healthy older adults
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2023 (English)In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 29, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Maintaining physical activity (PA) and functioning (mobility, balance) is essential for older adults’ well-being and quality of life. However, current methods (functional tests, self-reports) and available techniques (accelerometers, sensors, advanced movement analysis systems) for assessing physical activity and functioning have shown to be less reliable, time- and resource-consuming with limited routine usage in clinical practice. There is a need to simplify the assessment of physical activity and functioning among older adults both in health care and clinical studies. This work presents a study on using Skeleton Avatar Technology (SAT) for this assessment. SAT analyzes human movement videos using artificial intelligence (AI). The study compares handy SAT based on 2D camera technology (2D SAT) with previously studied 3D SAT for assessing physical activity and functioning in older adults. Objective: To explore whether 2D SAT yields accurate results in physical activity and functioning assessment in healthy older adults, statistically compared to the accuracy of 3D SAT. Method: The mobile pose estimation model provided by Tensorflow was used to extract 2D skeletons from the video recordings of functional test movements. Deep neural networks were used to predict the outcomes of functional tests (FT), expert-based movement quality assessment (EA), accelerometer-based assessments (AC), and self-assessments of PA (SA). To compare the accuracy with 3D SAT models, statistical analysis was used to test whether the difference in the predictions between 2D and 3D models is significant or not. Results: Overall, the accuracy of 2D SAT is lower than 3D SAT in predicting FTs and EA. 2D SAT was able to predict AC with 7% Mean Absolute Error (MAE), and self-assessed PA (SA) with 16% MAE. On average MAE was 4% higher for 2D than for 3D SAT. There was no significant difference found between the 2D and the 3D model for AC and for two FTs (30 seconds chair stand test, 30sCST and Timed up and go, TUG). A significant difference was found for the 2D- and 3D-model of another FT (4-stage balance test, 4SBT). Conclusion: Altogether, the results show that handy 2D SAT might be used for assessing physical activity in older adults without a significant loss of accuracy compared to time-consuming standard tests and to bulky 3D SAT-based assessments. However, the accuracy of 2D SAT in assessing physical functioning should be improved. Taken together, this study shows promising results to use 2D SAT for assessing physical activity in healthy older adults in future clinical studies and clinical practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Open, 2023
Keywords
Physical activity, Skeleton avatar technology, machine learning, older adults, functioning mobility, balance
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Computer Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Health Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125488 (URN)10.1177/14604582231214589 (DOI)001095930700001 ()2-s2.0-85176326223 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-06 Created: 2023-11-06 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
Johnsson, N., Strandberg, S., Tuvesson, H., Fagerström, C., Ekstedt, M. & Lindberg, C. (2023). Delineating and clarifying the concept of self-care monitoring: a concept analysis. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 18(1), Article ID 2241231.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Delineating and clarifying the concept of self-care monitoring: a concept analysis
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 2241231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim

To delineate and clarify the meaning of the concept of self-care monitoring from a patient perspective.

Methods

A systematic search was performed in the databases ASSIA, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and PubMed (January 2016–September 2021). A selection of 46 peer-reviewed articles was included in the study and analysed using Rodgers’ Evolutionary Method for Concept Analysis.

Results

The following four attributes were identified: Tracking symptoms, signs, and actions, Paying attention, Being confident, and Needing routines, creating a descriptive definition: “Self-care monitoring is an activity that means a person has to pay attention and be confident and needs routines for tracking symptoms, signs, and action.” The antecedents of the concept were shown to be Increased knowledge, Wish for independence, and Commitment. The concepts’ consequences were identified as Increased interaction, Perceived burden, and Enhanced well-being.

Conclusions

This concept analysis provides extensive understanding of self-care monitoring from a patient perspective. It was shown that the concept occurs when a person practices self-care monitoring at home either with or without devices. A descriptive definition was constructed and presented with exemplars to encourage practice of the concept in various healthcare settings and could be of relevance to people with chronic illnesses or other long-term conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
caring, concept analysis, monitoring, person, self-care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123386 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2023.2241231 (DOI)001036782100001 ()2-s2.0-85166001212 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-07-29 Created: 2023-07-29 Last updated: 2023-08-14Bibliographically approved
Miladinia, M., Jahangiri, M., Kennedy, A. B., Fagerström, C., Tuvesson, H., Safavi, S. S., . . . Karimpourian, H. (2023). Determining massage dose-response to improve cancer-related symptom cluster of pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance: A 7-arm randomized trial in palliative cancer care. Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, 37(1), 108-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determining massage dose-response to improve cancer-related symptom cluster of pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance: A 7-arm randomized trial in palliative cancer care
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2023 (English)In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 108-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The efficacy of various massage doses in palliative cancer care settings is still debated, and no specific protocol is available. Aim: Evaluating response to various massage doses for symptom cluster of pain-fatigue-sleep. Design: A 7-arm randomized-controlled trial with weekly massage for 4 weeks depending on the prescribed dose (15-, 30-, or 60-min; 2x or 3x/week) and a 4-week follow-up. The intensities of pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance were measured using a 0-10 scale at nine-timepoint; baseline, weekly during the intervention, and the follow-up period. Then, the mean scores of the three symptoms were calculated as the symptom cluster intensity at each timepoint. IRCT.ir IRCT20150302021307N5. Setting/participants: Adults with cancer (n = 273) who reported all three symptoms at three oncology centers in Iran. Results: The odds of clinical improvement (at least 30% reduction in symptom cluster intensity from baseline) increased with dose-escalation significantly [(OR = 17.37; 95% CI = 3.87-77.90 for 60-min doses); (OR = 11.71; 95% CI = 2.60-52.69, for 30-min doses); (OR = 4.36; 95% CI = 0.94-20.32, for 15-min doses)]. The effect durability was significantly shorter at 15-min doses compared to 30- and 60-min doses. The odds of improvement for doses 3x/week was not significant compared to doses 2x/week (OR = 12.27 vs OR = 8.34); however, the effect durability for doses 3x/week was significantly higher. Conclusions: The findings indicated that dose-escalation increases the efficacy of massage for the pain-fatigue-sleep symptom cluster. Although the 60-min doses were found to be more effective, the 30-min doses can be considered more practical because they are less costly and time-consuming. Our findings can be helpful to develop massage guidelines in palliative care settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
Palliative care, oncology, comfort care, complementary therapies, holistic medicine, integrative medicine, supportive care, clinical trial
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-117164 (URN)10.1177/02692163221129158 (DOI)000868095800001 ()36226676 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85140963284 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-11-01 Created: 2022-11-01 Last updated: 2023-04-20Bibliographically approved
Rosenburg, M., Lindqvist, G., Tuvesson, H. & Fagerström, C. (2023). Experiences of undergoing venous leg ulcer management: A reflective lifeworld research study. International Wound Journal, 20(6), 1857-1865
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of undergoing venous leg ulcer management: A reflective lifeworld research study
2023 (English)In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 1857-1865Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Venous leg ulcers have multiple consequences for the patient. Ulcer management can be lengthy and recurrence is common. As the patient is the expert on their experiences and life, the aim of the present study was to describe patients' lived experiences of undergoing management for a venous leg ulcer. The study encompassed 16 phenomenological interviews. The analysis led to a description of the phenomenon's essence, further described by three constituents. The essential meaning of the phenomenon is described as being in an oscillation between hope and despair. Ulcer management is challenging for the patient, who feels unseen and lives with doubts during the management period. This study is considered enriching as it puts words to the patients' suffering during ulcer management and shows that reliable relationships and competence can reduce patient doubts. This knowledge should enable improvement of patient care and treatment during ulcer management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-117730 (URN)10.1111/iwj.14044 (DOI)000914185900001 ()36457152 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143762876 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20190132
Available from: 2022-12-02 Created: 2022-12-02 Last updated: 2023-09-19Bibliographically approved
Bratt, A. S. & Fagerström, C. (2023). Perceptions of General Attitudes towards Older Adults in Society: Is There a Link between Perceived Life Satisfaction, Self-Compassion, and Health-Related Quality of Life?. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 20(4), Article ID 3011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of General Attitudes towards Older Adults in Society: Is There a Link between Perceived Life Satisfaction, Self-Compassion, and Health-Related Quality of Life?
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 3011Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Negative attitudes towards aging are common in society. However, few studies haveinvestigated how older adults perceive this phenomenon. This study investigated (a) how olderadults in Sweden perceive general attitudes towards the older population and whether negativeperceptions are associated with low life satisfaction, self-compassion, and health-related qualityof life (HRQL), and (b) whether perceived attitudes predict life satisfaction when controlling forHRQL, self-compassion, and age. The sample comprised 698 randomly selected participants, aged66–102 years, from the Blekinge part of the Swedish National Study on Ageing and Care. The resultsshowed that 25.7% of the participants held negative attitudes towards older adults and reportedlower life satisfaction and HRQL. Self-compassion was related to higher life satisfaction, perceivedpositive attitudes, and better mental HRQL. Overall, perceived attitudes, HRQL, self-compassion,and age predicted 44% of the participants’ life satisfaction. Understanding the factors that influenceolder adults’ life satisfaction is crucial, as health-related losses might reduce the opportunity fora successful life. Our study makes an important contribution to the field, showing that perceivedattitudes explained 1.2% of the variance of life satisfaction, whereas mental and physical HRQLaccounted for 18% of life satisfaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: MDPI, 2023
Keywords
aging, aged, attitude, stereotyping, quality of life, psychological well-being
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-119256 (URN)10.3390/ijerph20043011 (DOI)2-s2.0-85148964294 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-02-10 Created: 2023-02-10 Last updated: 2023-04-25Bibliographically approved
Strandberg, S., Backåberg, S., Fagerström, C. & Ekstedt, M. (2023). Self-care management and experiences of using telemonitoring as support when living with hypertension or heart failure: A descriptive qualitative study. International Journal of Nursing Studies Advances, 5, Article ID 100149.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care management and experiences of using telemonitoring as support when living with hypertension or heart failure: A descriptive qualitative study
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies Advances, E-ISSN 2666-142X, Vol. 5, article id 100149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background The need for support in self-care at home will increase with the growing older population with chronic illness. Many people have one or more chronic illnesses and struggle with self-care activities, often supported by informal carers at home. The rapid development of telemonitoring applications in primary care calls for increased knowledge about how people with chronic illness and their informal carers experience the use of telemonitoring applications at home.

Objective This study aims to describe experiences of self-care management at home when living with hypertension or heart failure, with support from primary care through telemonitoring.

Design A descriptive qualitative approach was applied using semi-structured interviews with patients and informal carers in a pilot project on telemonitoring of chronic illness in primary care from October 2019 to June 2021.SettingParticipants were recruited from three primary care settings and one medical department at one hospital in a region in southern Sweden.ParticipantsA purposive sample of patients (n = 20) with chronic illness living at home and their informal carers (n = 4) were recruited.

Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted, guided by open-ended questions targeting patients’ and informal carers’ experiences of self-care management at home and using telemonitoring applications as support. Transcribed interviews were analyzed through qualitative content analysis.

Results ’Developing the capability to perform self-care with technology as both an intruder and an invited guest’ was the unifying theme that tied together the experiences of patients with chronic illness and their informal carers. Experiences of self-care management included acquiring necessary self-care skills, expertise in managing their chronic illness, and reciprocal relationships with healthcare professionals when using telemonitoring application as support in self-care monitoring of vital parameters. However, uncertainty regarding the interpretation of symptoms and a feeling of exclusion were seen.

Conclusions Telemonitoring applications offer potential support for patients with chronic illnesses and their informal carers, enabling them to establish new routines and enhance motivation for self-care activities at home. This study emphasizes the adaptability of telemonitoring applications in meeting the unique support requirements of patients and informal carers when managing self-care at home.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Chronic disease, eHealth, Informal caregivers, Patient, Primary care, Qualitative research, Self-care, Telehealth
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123806 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnsa.2023.100149 (DOI)001064891300001 ()2-s2.0-85172447535 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-18 Created: 2023-08-18 Last updated: 2023-10-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4257-282X

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