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Boukeng, L. B., Minkandi, C. A. & Dapi Nzefa, L. (2023). Oral pathology and overweight among pupils in government primary schools in Cameroon: a cross-sectional study. BMC Oral Health, 23(1), Article ID 282.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral pathology and overweight among pupils in government primary schools in Cameroon: a cross-sectional study
2023 (English)In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundTooth decay and periodontal diseases are the main oral pathologies in the world. The prevalence of overweight in children has increased worldwide. Overweight children have alterations in the composition of saliva and excessive consumption of saturated fatty acids tend to slow the metabolism of carbohydrates in the oral cavity leading to tooth decay, periodontal disease and others oral disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between oral pathologies and overweight in pupils of primary schools of Cameroon.MethodsA cross-sectional study was carried out from June to August 2020 in four government primary schools selected through cluster sampling in Yaounde. 650 pupils aged between 6 and 11 years were enrolled. Data collected included anthropometric, oral pathologies, quality of oral hygiene and feeding habits. Data were analysed with the SPSS 26.0 statistical software and binary logistic regression was used to determine the risks of oral pathologies in overweight pupils. P-value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant.ResultsThe prevalence of overweight was 27% (95% CI: 23.5-30.5). The main oral pathologies was tooth decay (60.3%). Binary logistic regression revealed that overweight pupils were significantly 1.5 times more likely to develop tooth decay than non-overweight pupils (95% CI: 1.1-2.4).ConclusionOverweight, tooth decay are prevalent among pupils. Overweight pupils have a higher risk of developing tooth decay compared to non-obese pupils. An integrated package of oral and nutritional health promotion activities is necessary in primary schools in Cameroon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Overweight, Tooth decay, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Pupils, Cameroon
National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Natural Science, Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-121482 (URN)10.1186/s12903-023-02941-z (DOI)000986361600001 ()37173666 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159740916 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-08 Created: 2023-06-08 Last updated: 2023-09-06Bibliographically approved
Betterdel, A. N., Meriki, H. D., Mbanga, C. M., Dapi Nzefa, L., Nchung, A. J., Mbhenyane, X. G. & Tambe, A. B. (2023). Poor Dietary Diversity, a Key Determinant of Household Food Insecurity: Insights from a Community-Based Survey in Buea Health District, Cameroon. Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Poor Dietary Diversity, a Key Determinant of Household Food Insecurity: Insights from a Community-Based Survey in Buea Health District, Cameroon
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition, ISSN 1932-0248, E-ISSN 1932-0256Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The current study aims at assessing dietary diversity and household food insecurity among children under 5 years. A community-based cross-sectional survey of 321 households was carried out with the use of a structured questionnaire. The findings reveal that household food insecurity is highly prevalent within the study area and this is mainly as a result of low dietary diversity, which impacts the nutritional status of children under-five. This calls for the intensification of food aid and hunger relief activities within the area. Gender disparities in the mist of food insecurity highlight the need for gender-sensitive interventions against the condition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2023
Keywords
Food security, poor dietary diversity, determinants, children under-five, Cameroon
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-122006 (URN)10.1080/19320248.2023.2221189 (DOI)000999550500001 ()2-s2.0-85161494819 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-16 Created: 2023-06-16 Last updated: 2023-08-24
Ngassa, A. B., Meriki, H. D., Mbanga, C. M., Dapi Nzefa, L., Mbhenyane, X. & Tambe, A. B. (2022). Key predictors of undernutrition among children 6-59 months in the Buea Health District of the Southwest region of Cameroon: a cross sectional community-based survey. BMC Nutrition, 8(1), Article ID 148.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Key predictors of undernutrition among children 6-59 months in the Buea Health District of the Southwest region of Cameroon: a cross sectional community-based survey
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2022 (English)In: BMC Nutrition, E-ISSN 2055-0928, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: According to the 2018 Demographic and Health Survey, undernutrition remains a public health problem among Cameroonian children under-five. This varies across the country, greatest in areas with ongoing humanitarian crisis, such as the Southwest region. However, data on the burden of undernutrition in the Southwest region is sparse. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and predictors of undernutrition among children under-five in the Buea health district of the Southwest region of Cameroon.Methods: This was a community based cross-sectional study of 321 children under-five/caretaker pairs, surveyed from households selected using multistage randomized sampling. Data were collected by trained data collectors, with the aid of a structured, pre-tested questionnaire that captured information on sociodemographic characteristics, food security, dietary diversity and anthropometric measurements. The weight, height/length and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) were measured using standardized instruments. Stunting, Wasting and Underweight of children were calculated from Z-scores of Height-for-age (HAZ), Weight-for-height (WHZ) and Weight-for-age (WAZ) based on 2006 WHO standards. Data was analysed using SPSS version 27.0. Predictors of malnutrition were obtained using multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders.Results: Overall, 31.8% (102/321) of the children were undernourished (26.5% stunted, 1.6% underweight, 3.7% wasted). Drinking water from inappropriate sources (OR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.30-4.15) and a Dietary Diversity Score < 4 (OR: 2.59, 95%CI: 1.46-4.61) were independently associated with increased risk of stunting. Children of the male sex were more likely to be wasted than females (OR: 5.34, 95%CI: 1.09-26.14).Conclusion: Childhood undernutrition, particularly stunting is common in the Buea Health District. Risk factors of undernutrition identified are potentially modifiable, highlighting the need for nutrition specific and sensitive interventions to improve dietary diversity, and the need to improve access to safe drinking water, and educate caretakers on the importance of clean potable water, good sanitation and hygiene for the proper growth and development of their children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Buea-Cameroon, Children under-five, Drinking water, Predictors, Prevalence, Poor dietary diversity, Undernutrition
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-118179 (URN)10.1186/s40795-022-00646-0 (DOI)000898703400001 ()36514089 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144375614 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-09 Created: 2023-01-09 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
Pierz, A. J. & Dapi Nzefa, L. (2022). Traditional and colonial governance practices and their impact on women's identities and experiences in French Cameroon: a retrospective study. Social Identities, 28(2), 186-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traditional and colonial governance practices and their impact on women's identities and experiences in French Cameroon: a retrospective study
2022 (English)In: Social Identities, ISSN 1350-4630, E-ISSN 1363-0296, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 186-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In African traditional societies, women oversaw the maintenance of the household by assuming responsibilities such as mother, wife and caretaker. In addition to this, women were involved in economic and political affairs. During the colonial era, however, men were in charge of education, politics and economic affairs, to the near exclusion of women who were specifically trained for home caring roles and on being good wives. This study explores the impact of traditional and colonial systems on women's identities and lives in French Cameroon. Data was collected from five focus group discussions involving 24 conveniently sampled Cameroonian women aged 55 and above and analyzed using the framework of Content Analysis. The women acknowledged the marginal roles of women in traditional societies although respected and loved, social control and compliance rooted in traditional societies and exacerbated during colonial times, social isolation of women during colonialism because of the traditional roles assigned to women and their fear of white male colonialists, and gender-discriminate colonial education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
Marginal roles of women although respected and loved, social control and compliance, gender-discriminate colonial education, social isolation, French Cameroon
National Category
Gender Studies Social Anthropology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Gender Studies; Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-108300 (URN)10.1080/13504630.2021.1997734 (DOI)000714275400001 ()2-s2.0-85118572224 (Scopus ID)2021 (Local ID)2021 (Archive number)2021 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-12-01 Created: 2021-12-01 Last updated: 2022-04-21Bibliographically approved
Tambe, A. B., Mbanga, B. M. R., Dapi Nzefa, L. & Nama, M. G. (2019). Pesticide usage and occupational hazards among farmers working in small-scale tomato farms in Cameroon. Journal of the Egyptian Public Health Association, 94(1), 1-7, Article ID 20.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pesticide usage and occupational hazards among farmers working in small-scale tomato farms in Cameroon
2019 (English)In: Journal of the Egyptian Public Health Association, E-ISSN 2090-262X, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 1-7, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Agriculture is undoubtedly the backbone of the Cameroonian economy, and other economic activities thrive only if production in this sector is assured. It has been estimated that approximately 25 million agricultural workers worldwide experience unintentional pesticide poisoning yearly. Unfortunately, limited information exists about the health and safety of the farmers. The aim of this study was to describe the occupational health and safety (OHS) conditions of farmers working on small-scale tomato farms in the western region of Cameroon. A cross-sectional research method was used to collect data from tomato farmers in May 2017, using a questionnaire developed by the research team. Results: A total of 104 tomato farmers from small-scale farms participated in the study. The analysis revealed that the occupation is male-dominated (86.5%). The training and use of personal protective equipment (PPE) among farmers were rare (35.6%), and farmers were mostly exposed to chemical hazards. The farmers reported the following work-related health problems: skin irritation, backache, impairment of the central nervous system (CNS), visual problems, and respiratory difficulties. Conclusions: The OHS conditions on small-scale tomato farms are mostly poor, thus predisposing farmers to the risk of work-related health problems. Exposure to occupational hazards can be significantly reduced if the required PPE are available and efficiently used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Tomato farmers, Pesticides, Occupational health and safety, Cameroon
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Social Sciences, Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86958 (URN)10.1186/s42506-019-0021-x (DOI)000473818200001 ()2-s2.0-85067461901 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-24 Created: 2019-07-24 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Dapi Nzefa, L., Monebenimp, F. & Äng, C. (2019). Undernutrition among children under five in the Bandja village of Cameroon, Africa. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 32(2), 46-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undernutrition among children under five in the Bandja village of Cameroon, Africa
2019 (English)In: South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 1607-0658, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 46-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sub-Saharan Africa has a long history of struggling with child undernutrition. The prevalence of undernutrition is still high and knowledge about this public health problem and the underlying causes is essential for children’s health.

Aim: To evaluate the anthropometric status of children under five in the Bandja village of Cameroon.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken that included 388 children. Undernutrition was evaluated in terms of wasting, stunting and underweight. Information on sex, age, birth order, birth interval, duration of breastfeeding, and mother’s age at birth, occupation and educational level were collected.

Results: The prevalence of wasting, stunting and underweight was 3.2%, 16.4% and 5.2%, respectively. Boys were more stunted than girls (OR 2.24; 95% CI 1.16–4.34). Children less than 30 months were more often wasted than older children (OR 17.70; 95% CI 1.82–172.40). The first and second born in order were more stunted than the third or later born in order (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.02–4.18). Children of farming mothers were more often stunted (OR 2.87; 95% CI 1.35–6.13) and underweight (OR 3.47; 95% CI 1.09–11.09) than others. Children still being breastfed were more underweight (OR 6.52; 95% CI 1.31–32.43) than those whose mothers had finished breastfeeding.

Conclusion: Undernutrition is highly prevalent in Bandja, and is more common among boys, younger children, first born in order, children still being breastfed and children of farming mothers. This study underlines the importance of intervention to prevent and reduce undernutrition among children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Cameroon, children under five, stunting, underweight, wasting
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72277 (URN)10.1080/16070658.2018.1448503 (DOI)000466820100004 ()2-s2.0-85059671851 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-05 Created: 2018-04-05 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Oppong, G., Monebenimp, F. & Dapi Nzefa, L. (2019). ‘You just have to grin and bear’: emotional suppression among women in polygyny in Cameroon. Culture, Health and Sexuality, 21(8), 946-956
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘You just have to grin and bear’: emotional suppression among women in polygyny in Cameroon
2019 (English)In: Culture, Health and Sexuality, ISSN 1369-1058, E-ISSN 1464-5351, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 946-956Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Polygyny is a matrimonial union in which a single man is simultaneously married to multiple wives. On a daily basis, women in polygynous unions suffer from financial, emotional and physical burdens. This study explores women’s perceptions of this matrimonial regime and the factors influencing their sexual health decision-making in Cameroon. Drawing on interviews with twenty-three women aged 23 to 80 years living in polygynous unions, we explore women’s daily life and perceptions on polygyny. Using content analysis, meaning units relating to respondents’ experiences and perceptions were identified and condensed into codes and categories that were later grouped into themes. Five themes emerged – refusal and tolerance; heavy workload and responsibility; lack of power in sexual health decision-making; discrimination and unequal treatment of spouses; and emotional suppression. Women reported emotional suppression, limited rights, discrimination and poor living conditions as being the most significant problems that they encountered. Addressing the discrimination faced by women in polygynous unions will entail adopting and implementing laws to protect women’s rights and promote their empowerment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Polygyny; women; perceptions; emotional suppression; Cameroon
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79277 (URN)10.1080/13691058.2018.1527944 (DOI)000473015600006 ()30488784 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057612108 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Dapi Nzefa, L., Ayuk, T. B., Axberg, F., Lundström, L. & Hörnell, A. (2018). After giving birth to a baby, breastfeeding becomes your responsibility: Infant feeding perceptions and practices among women in Yaoundé, Bamenda and Bandja, Cameroon, Africa. International Research Journal of Public and Environmental Health, 5(3), 38-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>After giving birth to a baby, breastfeeding becomes your responsibility: Infant feeding perceptions and practices among women in Yaoundé, Bamenda and Bandja, Cameroon, Africa
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2018 (English)In: International Research Journal of Public and Environmental Health, ISSN 2360-8803, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 38-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Ministry of Public Health of Cameroon advises mothers to follow the World Health Organization’s recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months of life and to continue breastfeeding along with appropriate complementary foods up to two years or beyond. Despite these recommendations, malnutrition due to inadequate feeding practices is still prevalent in Cameroon. Therefore, this study aims to explore infant feeding perceptions and identify factors influencing infant feeding practices in Cameroon. Forty-nine women aged 19 to 38 who had infants aged 6 days to 15 months were purposively selected from hospitals during the vaccination days and interviewed until saturation. The research tools included six qualitative group interviews, with each group comprising 6 to 10 women. The study was conducted in the rural area of Bandja and the urban areas of Yaoundé and Bamenda. Data were analysed using content analysis. In the study, breastfeeding was agreed upon as the best way to feed infants and was commonly practised for 1 to 2 years. Nevertheless, few infants were breastfed exclusively. Complementary foods were often nutritionally inadequate; many children were not given fruit, vegetables or foods of animal origin on a daily basis. Cultural beliefs, tradition, community norms and low educational and economic levels negatively influenced the implementation of appropriate infant feeding recommendations. The short duration of exclusive breastfeeding and the poor food diversity are the main problems. In response, it is necessary to strengthen the position of women, increase the period of maternal leave, introduce sustainable and practical education for both parents about breastfeeding, and provide good, local complementary foods. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Journal Issues Limited, 2018
Keywords
Exclusive breastfeeding, malnutrition, feeding perceptions, Cameroon
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Social Sciences, Social Work; Health and Caring Sciences; Natural Science, Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72017 (URN)10.15739/irjpeh.18.007 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-03-30 Created: 2018-03-30 Last updated: 2020-10-26Bibliographically approved
Dapi Nzefa, L., Tambe, B. A. & Monebenimp, F. (2018). Myths Surrounding Albinism and Struggles of Persons with Albinism to Achieve Human Rights in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Journal of Human Rights and Social Work, 3(1), 11-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Myths Surrounding Albinism and Struggles of Persons with Albinism to Achieve Human Rights in Yaoundé, Cameroon
2018 (English)In: Journal of Human Rights and Social Work, ISSN 2365-1792, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 11-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Persons with albinism (PWA) in Yaoundé, Cameroon are reported to experience stigma, discrimination and violation of their human rights based primarily on their lack of pigmentation in their skin, eyes and hair. This study explores the challenges faced by persons with albinism, with particular reference to their knowledge of albinism, social and health issues and support. This qualitative research study recruited persons with albinism through a non-probability sampling technique in the city of Yaoundé, capital city of Cameroon. Data were collected through three focus group discussions with 19 persons (13 women and 6 men, adults) with albinism and thematic content analysis was employed to analyze responses. Almost all participants revealed societal discrimination, stigmatization, human rights violations, and some reported frustration due to injustice, rejection and superstitions. All the participants had visual problems and 12 had skin diseases. These conditions were inadequately managed due to lack of care, rejection by others, superstition and limited financial resources. The majority of participants had a good understanding of albinism. This study urges social work interventions such as support groups for persons with albinism and their families; educational awareness programmes; and advocacy for the rights of persons with albinism to healthcare, education and employ- ment opportunities, and to demystify all myths and cultural beliefs surrounding albinism. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
People with albinism, Discrimination, Minority group rights, Lack of care, Cameroon
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Sciences, Social Work; Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70288 (URN)10.1007/s41134-018-0048-5 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-30 Created: 2018-01-30 Last updated: 2018-05-09Bibliographically approved
Ayuk, B. T., Dapi Nzefa, L. & Nchang Allo, N. (2015). Childhood Diarrhea Determinants in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Cross Sectional Study of Tiko-Cameroon. Challenges, 6(2), 229-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood Diarrhea Determinants in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Cross Sectional Study of Tiko-Cameroon
2015 (English)In: Challenges, ISSN 2078-1547, E-ISSN 2078-1547, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 229-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Diarrhea remains the second leading cause of death among children under five years globally. Nearly one in five child deaths, about 1.5 million each year, are due to diarrhea. It kills more young children than Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), malaria and measles combined. World Health Organization has accordingly underlined the need for epidemiological surveys of infantile diarrhea in all geographical areas. The main research objectives were to estimate the prevalence of diarrhea and identify factors associated with diarrheal diseases in Tiko city in Cameroon. Method: The present study was a cross-sectional community household survey which was conducted in Tiko town from 1st to 31st of August 2012. With the use of a questionnaire, a total of 602 households that had at least one child under five years of age were interviewed. Mothers/caregivers were questioned on the morbidity of diarrhea and the logistic regression model was employed to examine the determinants of childhood diarrhea. Both univariable and multivariable data analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0. Results: The results of this study showed that the prevalence of diarrhea was 23.8% and children under 24 months were highly affected. We found children using the main toilet and other types of toilet facilities such as bushes, diaper, and streams (OR: 0.194; p < 0.001, 95% CI) and usage of narrow-mouth container for storage of drinking water (OR: 0.492; p < 0.001, 95% CI) less likely to suffer from diarrhea. In contrast, higher rates of diarrhea prevalence were seen in children from households with two or more siblings (OR: 1.222; p < 0.001, 95% CI) and whose mothers/caregivers never had the knowledge of safe sources of drinking water (OR: 1.849; p < 0.01, 95% CI). Conclusion: Childhood diarrhea is a public health problem in Tiko city. Hence, interventions aimed at reducing the prevalence should take into consideration the integration of family planning activities in the prevention of childhood diarrhea and the deployed of health personals to educate the community to adopt a hygienic behavior. Future research on the topic should be qualitative inquiry to complement the quantitative nature of this study.

Keywords
risk factors; prevalence; morbidity; childhood diarrhea; Cameroon
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-68848 (URN)10.3390/challe6020229 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1828-6831

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