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Källkvist, M., Gyllstad, H., Sundqvist, P. & Sandlund, E. (2019). Code-switching in two multilingual secondary-school English classrooms in Sweden: Teacher practices and student attitudes. In: NOFA7 Abstracts: Stockholm University, 13 - 15 May 2019. Paper presented at NOFA7 Nordic Conference on Teaching and Learning in Curriculum Subjects, Stockholm University, 13-15, 2019 (pp. 129-129). Stockholm: Stockholm University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Code-switching in two multilingual secondary-school English classrooms in Sweden: Teacher practices and student attitudes
2019 (English)In: NOFA7 Abstracts: Stockholm University, 13 - 15 May 2019, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2019, p. 129-129Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Currently, there is no research-based evidence to guide teachers of English in Sweden as to whether and how to use students’ background languages to facilitate learning, participation and engagement (Author & Others 2017). Existing research shows beneficial effects of providing L1 (mother-tongue) translation equivalents of English vocabulary (Lee & Macaro 2013; Prince 1996), of teacher code-switches into students’ L1 for learning English grammar (Kupferberg & Olshtain 1996; Rolin-Ianziti & Brownlie 2002), and of translanguaging pedagogy (Cummins 2017; Paulsrud et al. 2017). This research also reveals a lack of studies in English classrooms in Scandinavia. The prior research in English classrooms was carried out in other parts of the world, and in all cases students shared the same L1. The present study breaks new ground by focusing on classrooms with diversity in students’ L1 backgrounds, reflecting growing multilingualism in Scandinavia (Dahl et al. 2018; Paulsrud et al. 2018). Based in theory of teachers as policy makers (Menken & García 2010) and in bilingualism research (Baker & Wright 2017), our project focuses on the teaching and learning of English in multilingual Swedish schools (students aged 13-16). In this paper, we report results of a case study (Duff 2008) conducted within a larger project (Author & Others 2017). Participants are one English ‘excellent’ teacher (förstelärare) and two student groups: a mainstream (23 students) and a fast-track (21 students) English year-8 class. Using ethnographic methods of classroom observation (14 lessons), photography, questionnaire and interviews (the teacher and 18 students of different L1 backgrounds), we address the following questions: 1) To what extent and for what purposes does the teacher draw on students’ background languages when teaching English?, and 2) What are students’ beliefs about their teacher’s use of English and other languages in English lessons?. Data analysis reveals that the teacher used mainly English (the target language), but also Swedish (the majority language in Sweden and school language), although sparingly, to translate vocabulary, explain grammar, communicate task requirements and grading criteria. The interviews drew on the shared experiences of the observed lessons (where researchers and students were co-present) and revealed that students were highly aware of their teacher’s code-switches, and that students with a lower proficiency level in English stated that they benefited from receiving information in both English and Swedish. An important implication is that the students believed that their teacher’s code-switches served to facilitate their literacy development in English and in Swedish.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2019
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Education, Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82617 (URN)
Conference
NOFA7 Nordic Conference on Teaching and Learning in Curriculum Subjects, Stockholm University, 13-15, 2019
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Källkvist, M., Gyllstad, H., Sandlund, E. & Sundqvist, P. (2019). English Only in Multilingual Classrooms?: A study of students' self-reported practices and attitudes. In: AAAL conference Atlanta 2019: Sheraton Atlanta Hotel - March 9-12. Paper presented at AAAL conference Atlanta 2019. Sheraton Atlanta Hotel - March 9-12. Atlanta, GA: American Association For Applied Linguistics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>English Only in Multilingual Classrooms?: A study of students' self-reported practices and attitudes
2019 (English)In: AAAL conference Atlanta 2019: Sheraton Atlanta Hotel - March 9-12, Atlanta, GA: American Association For Applied Linguistics , 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A pressing issue in multilingual education is when to draw on students’ multilingual repertoires to enhance learning and promote equity (Cummins 2017; Kramsch 2009).  Classroom research in L2 learning supports multilingual/translanguaging practices (e.g. Lee & Macaro 2013; Zhang 2018), but much of this research involves participants who had acquired the same L1 prior to having classroom exposure to English (L2). The present study breaks new ground by focusing on multilingual participants with different L1s: Participants are either simultaneous bilinguals of Swedish (the majority language) and a heritage language (such as Somali), or L1-speakers of their heritage language, learning both Swedish and English in a high school in Sweden. Triangulated qualitative data were collected in 2018 in two groups of students (age 14-15): ethnographic observation (14 English lessons), student questionnaires and interviews (18 students) and an interview with their teacher. With an analytical framework rooted in bilingualism/multilingualism (Baker & Wright 2017), concepts such as ‘language dominance’, ‘age of onset’, ‘heritage language’, ‘majority language’ and ‘school language’ were applied in qualitative analysis. As a basis for studying students’ attitudes, the classroom observations revealed that the teacher used mainly English; Swedish was restricted to metalinguistic explanations, translations of vocabulary, and information pertaining to task requirements and grading criteria. Student interviews revealed that the majority stated that they benefit from their teacher’s explanations in both English and Swedish, of Swedish translation equivalents, and of task and grading information verbalized in both English and Swedish. Students with lower proficiency in English expressed a greater need for Swedish. Students who were dominant in their heritage language expressed a need to draw on the heritage language, although not necessarily in the classroom. An important implication is the value to students of certain information being provided both in the target language (English) and in the school language (Swedish).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Atlanta, GA: American Association For Applied Linguistics, 2019
National Category
Specific Languages Didactics
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81066 (URN)
Conference
AAAL conference Atlanta 2019. Sheraton Atlanta Hotel - March 9-12
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR-UVK 03469
Available from: 2019-03-13 Created: 2019-03-13 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Källkvist, M., Gyllstad, H., Sundqvist, P. & Sandlund, E. (2019). English-Swedish Translanguaging in Multilingual Secondary English Classrooms: A Study of Students' Attitudes. In: The third Swedish Translanguaging Conference: Abstracts. Paper presented at The 3rd Swedish Translanguaging Conference, Campus Växjö 11-12 April 2019 (pp. 48-49). Växjö: Linnaeus University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>English-Swedish Translanguaging in Multilingual Secondary English Classrooms: A Study of Students' Attitudes
2019 (English)In: The third Swedish Translanguaging Conference: Abstracts, Växjö: Linnaeus University , 2019, p. 48-49Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A pressing issue in multilingual education is when to draw on students’ entire multilingual repertoires to enhance learning and promote equity (Cummins 2017; Kramsch 2009).  Classroom research on the learning of L2 English supports multilingual/translanguaging practices (Lee & Macaro 2013; Zhang 2018), but much of this research involves students who had acquired the same L1 prior to having classroom exposure to English (L2). This study breaks new ground by focusing on multilingual students with different L1s: They are either simultaneous bilinguals of Swedish (the majority language) and a minority language (such as Somali), or L1-speakers of the minority language, learning both Swedish and English in a secondary school in Sweden. We collected triangulated qualitative data in 2018 in two groups of students (age 14-15): ethnographic observation (14 English lessons), student interviews (N=18) and an interview with their teacher. With an analytical framework rooted in bilingualism/multilingualism (Baker & Wright 2017), concepts such as ‘language dominance’, ‘age of onset’, ‘heritage language’, ‘majority language’ and ‘school language’ were applied in qualitative analysis. The classroom observation data revealed that the teacher, being a Swedish-English bilingual, used mainly English when teaching; Swedish was used for metalinguistic explanations, translations of vocabulary, and information pertaining to task requirements and grading criteria. In the interviews, the majority reported that they benefit from their teacher’s English-Swedish translanguaging practices, particularly from task and grading information being verbalized in both English and Swedish. Students with lower proficiency in English expressed a greater need for Swedish. Students dominant in their heritage language expressed a need to draw on the heritage language, mainly when doing their homework rather than in the classroom. An important implication is that the students placed value in receiving information about task requirements and grading criteria in both the target language (English) and in the school language (Swedish).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University, 2019
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81968 (URN)
Conference
The 3rd Swedish Translanguaging Conference, Campus Växjö 11-12 April 2019
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR-UVK 03469
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Källkvist, M. & Hult, F. M. (2019). Multilingualism as Problem, Right, or Resource? Negotiating Space for Languages Other than Swedish and English in University Language Planning. In: Kuteeva, M., Kaufhold, K., Hynninen, N. (Ed.), Language perceptions and practices in multilingual universities: Insights from Northern Europe. London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multilingualism as Problem, Right, or Resource? Negotiating Space for Languages Other than Swedish and English in University Language Planning
2019 (English)In: Language perceptions and practices in multilingual universities: Insights from Northern Europe / [ed] Kuteeva, M., Kaufhold, K., Hynninen, N., London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
Keywords
Multilingualism, Language Policy
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities, English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79122 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2019-10-02
Sandlund, E., Sundqvist, P., Källkvist, M. & Gyllstad, H. (2019). "Nej, it's RING!": Language practices in problem-solving sequences in a multilingual L2 English classroom. In: ICOP-L2 International Competences and Practices in a Second Language: Mälardalen University, Västerås, 29-31 May 2019. Abstracts. Paper presented at ICOP-L2 International Competences and Practices in a Second Language. Mälardalen University, Västerås, 29-31 May 2019 (pp. 45-45). Eskilstuna: Mälardalens högskola
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Nej, it's RING!": Language practices in problem-solving sequences in a multilingual L2 English classroom
2019 (English)In: ICOP-L2 International Competences and Practices in a Second Language: Mälardalen University, Västerås, 29-31 May 2019. Abstracts, Eskilstuna: Mälardalens högskola , 2019, p. 45-45Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As a result of the recent European migration crisis, the learner population in L2 English classrooms in Scandinavia is now characterized by linguistic and cultural diversity, and both target and majority language proficiency may vary extensively in an English classroom (Källkvist et al, 2017).  Such changes also challenges the suitability of both an ‘English Only’ teaching ideology (Lundahl, 2012), and an alternation between target and majority languages in teaching L2 English. While translanguaging practices have gained research support (García & Wei, 2014), empirical studies of L2 English learning in situated interaction in multilingual L2 English classrooms in Scandinavia are scarce. Drawing on data from 13 video-recorded English lessons in multilingual classrooms (years 7, 8) of Swedish compulsory school, we examine situated language practices among learners in a linguistically and culturally diverse classroom, focusing on language-related problem-solving sequences. Data was transcribed and analyzed from a conversation analytic perspective (Sidnell & Stivers, 2013; Wei, 2005; Üstünel & Seedhouse, 2005). Focusing on participants’ use of available language resources in doing language-related problem-solving, we examine sequences from a vocabulary game activity in which learners have been instructed to explain English words to co-participants through reformulations and synonyms, and where co-participants compete in guessing words. We focus on learners’ collaborative, stepwise guesswork and meaning negotiation, particularly where understanding problems arise, such as orientations to two homonyms of a word. In these trajectories, learners draw on English, Swedish, and embodied action to make relevant and resolve task-related problems. Analyses reveal that in these multilingual groups, all languages are potential resources in problem-solving, but only English and Swedish are verbally displayed. However, analysis of post-negotiation accounts of the problems-at-hand reveal orientations to co-participants’ multilingual identities, and to English and Swedish proficiency identities. Also, blame for understanding problems is sometimes assigned to a learner’s ‘inner translanguaging’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Eskilstuna: Mälardalens högskola, 2019
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-84470 (URN)
Conference
ICOP-L2 International Competences and Practices in a Second Language. Mälardalen University, Västerås, 29-31 May 2019
Projects
Flerspråkiga praktiker - en resurs i engelskundervisningen (VR-UVK 2016-03469)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR-UVK 2016-03469
Available from: 2019-05-31 Created: 2019-05-31 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Källkvist, M., Gyllstad, H., Sundqvist, P. & Sandlund, E. (2019). Translanguaging in English Classrooms in Sweden?: A Study of Teacher Beliefs and Practices. In: The third Swedish Translanguaging Conference: Abstracts. Paper presented at The 3rd Swedish Translanguaging Conference, Campus Växjö 11-12 April 2019 (pp. 84-85). Växjö: Linnaeus University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translanguaging in English Classrooms in Sweden?: A Study of Teacher Beliefs and Practices
2019 (English)In: The third Swedish Translanguaging Conference: Abstracts, Växjö: Linnaeus University , 2019, p. 84-85Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In English Language Teaching in Sweden, the entextualized ideology is monolingual, i.e., English Only (Hult, 2017; Lundahl, 2012). Evidence from a large-scale classroom observation study (Swedish Schools Inspectorate, 2011) and a smaller-scale classroom-interaction study (Authors 3 & 4 2016) reveals a de facto bilingual policy of both English and Swedish enacted in classrooms, however. As studies focusing on English teachers’ beliefs are lacking, we do not know whether in-service English teachers themselves endorse the monolingual belief that is entextualized in education policies (Hult 2017) and materials for pre-service teachers (Lundahl, 2012). In this paper we address this research gap by reporting quantitative results from a nation-wide questionnaire administered to a stratified random sample of in-service teachers of English in Swedish secondary schools (N = 139). The questionnaire, administered online in 2017, targeted beliefs and self-reported practices linked to the use of languages in the English classroom. The results show that an overwhelming majority of teachers (98%) saw multilingualism as something positive, and 83% said that background languages should be drawn upon when learning an additional one. More specifically for English, 63% agreed that pupils learn English best if they are allowed to use their background language(s) in the learning. At the same time, seemingly conflicting, c. 60% stated that they use English only when teaching, and 66% that pupils learn English best if they stick to English only during English lessons. These results will be interpreted through the theoretical lens of ‘educators as policymakers’ (Menken & García, 2010), where teachers are conceived of as active agents implementing language education policies as well as language (learning) ideologies into their teaching practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University, 2019
National Category
Didactics Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81970 (URN)
Conference
The 3rd Swedish Translanguaging Conference, Campus Växjö 11-12 April 2019
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR UVK 03469
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Källkvist, M., Gyllstad, H., Sundqvist, P. & Sandlund, E. (2019). Translanguaging Practices in English Language Teaching in Scandinavian Contexts. In: The third Swedish Translanguaging Conference: Abstracts. Paper presented at The 3rd Swedish Translanguaging Conference (pp. 79-80). Växjö: Linnaeus University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translanguaging Practices in English Language Teaching in Scandinavian Contexts
2019 (English)In: The third Swedish Translanguaging Conference: Abstracts, Växjö: Linnaeus University , 2019, p. 79-80Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With the over-arching aim of contributing to the development of evidence-based teaching practices, this colloquium provides a forum for scholars doing research on language practices in the teaching of English as a foreign/second language (L2) in mainstream schools in Scandinavia. In Sweden, the English teaching profession has long been guided by monolingual, English Only, ideology, particularly at the secondary and upper-secondary levels where many students are proficient enough to use English as the medium of communication with their teacher (Authors 2017; Lundahl 2012). While the predominant ideology has been English Only, classroom observation studies in Sweden and Norway have shown that in practice many teachers enact a bilingual, English-Swedish or English-Norwegian classroom language policy (Authors 3 & 4 2016; Brevik & Rindal 2018; Lundahl 2012; Skolinspektionen 2011;). Given growing linguistic diversity in schools in Scandinavia, teachers may embrace English Only as the language policy for the future: English is the only shared language the English classroom (cf. Lundahl 2012). Alternatively – and in stark contrast – teachers may welcome translanguaging ideology and pedagogy, and intentionally draw on students’ entire meaning-making repertoires in the classroom. English teachers may thus find themselves at the centre of a tension between monolingual ideology and translanguaging ideology with little guidance from national-level syllabi. Educational policy documents in Sweden leave English teachers to rely on their own professional judgement for when to use languages other than English to facilitate students’ learning of English and fostering their identities as users of multiple named languages (Hult 2017).

A research basis for translanguaging pedagogy is gradually developing. Four recent book-length publications on translanguaging in Swedish contexts (Paulsrud, Rosén, Straszer & Wedin 2017, 2018; Svensson 2017; Wedin 2017) reveal an impressive amount of interesting research in a range of educational contexts: primary education, mother-tongue instruction of different minority languages, deaf education, Swedish as a second language, subject teaching in English in English-medium schools, and higher education.  At the same time, these books clearly reveal the lack of empirical research from L2 English classrooms in mainstream compulsory schools, i.e. the kind of school attended by the vast majority of students. The colloquium addresses this research gap by bringing together scholars who are researching the teaching of English in mainstream compulsory schools in Scandinavia. English classrooms are by their very nature multilingual spaces, so research is warranted here: All students are developing literacy in the majority language (Swedish in Sweden, Norwegian in Norway etc), in English (compulsory), often another modern language such as French, German or Spanish, and in mother-tongue instruction as an elective subject for students in Sweden who use a minority language at home.

The colloquium includes presentations by five different researchers/research teams, representing different universities in Norway and Sweden. Using an ethnographic approach, presentation 1 focuses on teachers’ language practices in English for young learners in three primary schools in Sweden, all with a large multilingual student body. Presentations 2 and 3 present two separate studies researching translingual writing instruction in English classrooms in secondary and upper-secondary schools in Norway. Presentation 2 is based in linguistic ethnography, whereas presentation 3 reports results from a quantitative, quasi-experimental study. Presentations 4 and 5 turn our attention to beliefs about the role of multilingualism in the teaching and learning of L2 English in Swedish secondary schools among students (presentation 4) and among teachers of L2 English (presentation 5). While presentation 4 uses interview data from refugee-background secondary school students, presentation 5 reports results from a large-scale questionnaire study of English teachers in secondary schools across Sweden. To our knowledge, this is the first time Scandinavian researchers interested in multilingualism and the teaching of L2 English in mainstream schools gather in a colloquium to share and discuss their on-going, as yet unpublished, research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University, 2019
National Category
Didactics Specific Languages
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81969 (URN)
Conference
The 3rd Swedish Translanguaging Conference
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR UVK 03469
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Sundqvist, P., Sandlund, E., Källkvist, M., Fredholm, K. & Dahlberg, M. (2019). Ömsesidighet i framtidens praktiknära språkklassrumsforskning: ASLA-symposiets panelsamtal med forskare, lärare och elever. In: Birgitta Ljung Egeland, Tim Roberts, Erica Sandlund, Pia Sundqvist (Ed.), Birgitta Ljung Egeland, Tim Roberts, Erica Sandlund, Pia Sundqvist (Ed.), Klassrumsforskning och språk(ande): Rapport från ASLA-symposiet i Karlstad, 12–13 april, 2018. Paper presented at ASLA-symposiet i Karlstad, 12–13 april, 2018 (pp. 19-41). Karlstad: Karlstad University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ömsesidighet i framtidens praktiknära språkklassrumsforskning: ASLA-symposiets panelsamtal med forskare, lärare och elever
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2019 (Swedish)In: Klassrumsforskning och språk(ande): Rapport från ASLA-symposiet i Karlstad, 12–13 april, 2018 / [ed] Birgitta Ljung Egeland, Tim Roberts, Erica Sandlund, Pia Sundqvist, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2019, p. 19-41Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

Under ASLA-symposiet hölls för första gången ett panelsamtal om forskningsbehov i språkämnena där lärare, språkforskare och gymnasieelever deltog. I detta kapitel situerar vi idén med panelsamtalet i studier av lärares roll i och för den praktiknära skolforskningen. Vi redogör för några modeller för samverkan mellan lärare och forskare och diskuterar identifierade framgångsfaktorer i praktiknära forskning. Vi redogör också för KIPPS, det samverkansprojekt som möjliggjorde panelsamtalet och den satsning på praktiknära skolforskning som det statliga ULF-avtalet möjliggjort. Vi diskuterar sedan de tankar och idéer som lyftes i panelsamtalet i ljuset av aktionsforskning, lärares forskningsengagemang samt behovet av ömsesidigt kunskapsutbyte och lärande. Slutligen ger vi några förslag till vägar framåt för tillämpad språkvetenskap och praktiknära forskning och ASLA-föreningens möjliga roll i en sådan utveckling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2019
Series
ASLA:s skriftserie ; 27
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Humanities, English Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81975 (URN)978-91-87884-27-6 (ISBN)
Conference
ASLA-symposiet i Karlstad, 12–13 april, 2018
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Källkvist, M., Gyllstad, H., Sandlund, E. & Sundqvist, P. (2018). Alltid engelska i engelskundervisningen?: Flerspråkiga elevers perspektiv. In: Leda lärande 2018: . Paper presented at Leda lärande 2018. Stockholm: Stockholms stad
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alltid engelska i engelskundervisningen?: Flerspråkiga elevers perspektiv
2018 (Swedish)In: Leda lärande 2018, Stockholm: Stockholms stad , 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Ska elevers olika modersmål samt skolspråket svenska användas på engelsklektioner? Detta är den övergripande frågeställningen i forskningsprojektet Flerspråkiga praktiker – en resurs i engelskundervisningen? som är finansierat av Vetenskapsrådet. I föreläsningen presenteras forskning om undervisning och lärande i engelska som ligger till grund för projektet samt projektets första resultat. Dessa belyser flerspråkiga elevers och deras lärares attityder och praktiker gällande användningen av olika språk för att stödja lärande och delaktighet i engelskundervisningen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholms stad, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78391 (URN)
Conference
Leda lärande 2018
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR-UVK 2016-03469
Available from: 2018-10-21 Created: 2018-10-21 Last updated: 2019-01-17Bibliographically approved
Sundqvist, P., Gyllstad, H., Källkvist, M. & Sandlund, E. (2018). Developing and validating a questionnaire to map teacher beliefs and practices relating to multilingualism. In: ASLA-symposiet 2018 : Abstraktsamling: The ASLA Symposium 2018 : Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at The ASLA Symposium 2018 (pp. 87-87). Association suédoise de linguistique appliquée
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing and validating a questionnaire to map teacher beliefs and practices relating to multilingualism
2018 (English)In: ASLA-symposiet 2018 : Abstraktsamling: The ASLA Symposium 2018 : Book of Abstracts, Association suédoise de linguistique appliquée , 2018, p. 87-87Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Teachers’ and policy makers’ beliefs/ideologies are known to have considerable influ- ence on teaching practices (Cummins 2017). In Sweden’s current policy documents for English, monolingual teaching practices (‘English Only’) have strong ideological sup- port (cf. Skolverket 2011). A large-scale study (Skolinspektionen 2011) has shown that a bilingual, English-Swedish classroom language policy often emerges, however. With the current increase in students with a non-Swedish-speaking background, new beliefs and practices may emerge among teachers who teach English in language-diverse class- rooms, however. In such contexts, the English Only ideology may become even further entrenched since Swedish cannot be drawn on as a common background language (cf. Lundahl 2012). Alternatively, teachers may become influenced by the translanguaging ideology (García & Wei 2014), reconsider English Only and start drawing on multilin- gual students’ background languages as well as Swedish. In order to map in-service teachers’ beliefs and practices related to English Language Teaching (ELT) in language- diverse classrooms, a questionnaire was developed and administered online in 2017 to a random sample of English teachers in years 6-9 across Sweden. In this paper, we de- scribe how the questionnaire was designed, piloted and validated. Drawing on best prac- tice for the construction and use of questionnaires (Dörnyei & Taguchi 2010), we ac- count for the development of a pilot version, and discuss fundamental considerations in this process, such as construct definitions and operationalisations, validity and reliabil- ity, scale and item formats, and practical and theoretical challenges. The validation pro- cess included the use of raters for matching questions with targeted underlying con- structs, of an expert for advice on specific aspects, and an analysis of responses from a pilot administration of the instrument with teachers (N = 23) from the intended target population. The questionnaire will be made available to other researchers as a tool for capturing teacher beliefs about ELT in multilingual settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association suédoise de linguistique appliquée, 2018
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72859 (URN)
Conference
The ASLA Symposium 2018
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-04-15 Created: 2018-04-15 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8686-9959

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