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Makai, Péter Kristóf
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Makai, P. K. (2022). A toolkit for the intermedial analysis of computer games. In: Jørgen Bruhn;Beate Schirrmacher (Ed.), Intermedial Studies: An Introduction to Meaning Across Media (pp. 309-328). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A toolkit for the intermedial analysis of computer games
2022 (English)In: Intermedial Studies: An Introduction to Meaning Across Media / [ed] Jørgen Bruhn;Beate Schirrmacher, Routledge, 2022, p. 309-328Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter presents a series of research steps and sample questions that intermedial scholars will want to pursue to make sense of video games through the lens of their relationship to other media. For simplicity’s sake, we chose to include only single-player games to give prospective intermedial scholars of games a clearer idea of what a basic intermedial analysis of a game might entail. Almost all video games are animated. Whether it is via a sparkling animation of a gemstone or the elaborate motion-captured facial performance of a real actor, the worlds of computer games come alive as a result of the painstaking work of animators. Toonstruck is a graphical adventure game, which is a submedium of the qualified media type we call the video game. One shining example of how computer games adapt the conventions of literature is the textual adventure game 80 Days. 80 Days is an exquisitely crafted piece of playable literature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Specific Literatures Media and Communications
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-110588 (URN)10.4324/9781003174288-17 (DOI)9781032004549 (ISBN)978-1-032-00466-2 (ISBN)978-1-003-17428-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-02-23 Created: 2022-02-23 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Makai, P. K. (2022). Media and Modalities: Computer games. In: Jørgen Bruhn;Beate Schirrmacher (Ed.), Intermedial Studies: An Introduction to Meaning Across Media (pp. 69-85). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Media and Modalities: Computer games
2022 (English)In: Intermedial Studies: An Introduction to Meaning Across Media / [ed] Jørgen Bruhn;Beate Schirrmacher, Routledge, 2022, p. 69-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter discusses video games, also known as computer or digital games, as a distinct form of meaning-making. It explores the production process of games, accounting for how other media leave their mark on the creation of new games, followed by a survey of the basic media types and their role in generating meaning in games. The qualifying aspects of computer games shed light on how different service models, development stages, player modes and platforms affect their form and reception. If the computing machine is the technical medium for delivering the experience, then code is its basic medium in the production of computer games. Game design can be the work of a single person or a vast collaborative studio. Digital games make use of all available media modalities to create a gaming experience. The chapter concludes with how the four media modalities can be apprehended in video games, and what each contributes to the joys of gaming.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
Keywords
intermediality, film, technology, modalities, qualified medium
National Category
Studies on Film Media Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-110583 (URN)10.4324/9781003174288-5 (DOI)9781032004549 (ISBN)9781032004662 (ISBN)9781003174288 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-02-23 Created: 2022-02-23 Last updated: 2023-02-27Bibliographically approved
Askander, M., Gutowska, A. & Makai, P. K. (2022). Transmedial storyworlds. In: Jørgen Bruhn; Beate Schirrmacher (Ed.), Intermedial Studies: An Introduction to Meaning Across Media (pp. 265-281). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transmedial storyworlds
2022 (English)In: Intermedial Studies: An Introduction to Meaning Across Media / [ed] Jørgen Bruhn; Beate Schirrmacher, Routledge, 2022, p. 265-281Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sherlock Holmes has travelled across media borders extensively: from technical to technical medium, from basic to basic medium, and from qualified to qualified medium. Through the decades, Sherlock Holmes appeared in many different forms of storytelling and media constellations, so we can analyse the character in terms of transmediality. This chapter discusses one such example: Penny Dreadful, which originated in 2014 as a television series created by the acclaimed Hollywood screenwriter John Logan. The very same processes of worldmaking that have made Welcome to Night Vale successful have enabled the creation of the transmedial worlds of the Sherlock Holmes universe and the transfiction Penny Dreadful. Following Marie-Laure Ryan’s analysis of transmedia, Jan-Noel Thon also notes that transmedial storyworlds can be varying mixtures of canonical media products and fan-produced material. In terms of media modalities, a contemporary audio drama that mimics a community radio broadcast uses a single sensory modality: all information reaches the listeners through the ear.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Specific Literatures Media and Communications
Research subject
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-110587 (URN)10.4324/9781003174288-15 (DOI)9781032004549 (ISBN)978-1-032-00466-2 (ISBN)978-1-003-17428-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-02-23 Created: 2022-02-23 Last updated: 2023-02-07Bibliographically approved
Makai, P. K. (2020). Ascending the Evolutionary Trees: The 'Epic of Evolution' Narrative in Games. In: DiGRA ’20: Proceedings of the 2020 DiGRA International Conference: Play Everywhere. Paper presented at Digra 2020 Conference, Tampere (cancelled). Digra
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ascending the Evolutionary Trees: The 'Epic of Evolution' Narrative in Games
2020 (English)In: DiGRA ’20: Proceedings of the 2020 DiGRA International Conference: Play Everywhere, Digra , 2020Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The extended abstract outlines the analysis of games like Ancestors: The Humankind Odyssey (2019) and the incremental game Cell to Singularity - Evolution Never Ends (2019) in terms of the biological and technological trees the player 'ascends' by playing the game.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Digra, 2020
National Category
Visual Arts
Research subject
Humanities; Humanities, Visual Culture; Media Studies and Journalism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93607 (URN)
Conference
Digra 2020 Conference, Tampere (cancelled)
Note

Ej belagd 211130

Available from: 2020-04-19 Created: 2020-04-19 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Makai, P. K. (2020). Climate Change on Cardboard: Ecological Eurogames. Paradoxa (31), 77-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate Change on Cardboard: Ecological Eurogames
2020 (English)In: Paradoxa, ISSN 1079-8072, no 31, p. 77-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article examines how climate change has been simulated in modern hobby boardgaming. It argues that, like other playful media, board games are an important vehicle for the communication of the scientific principles behind climate change because learning and applying the rules of the game imply a tacit acceptance of the logic of climate change, and the players’ agency activate problem-solving skills that highlight the social and political aspects of climate change action. The article investigates four board games, 20th Century, CO2: Second Chance, Rescue Polar Bears: Data and Temperature, and Keep Cool, including modifications to the original rules of CO2, to demonstrate the wealth and breadth of representing how human actions factor into the current climate crisis. Methodologically, the author merges theories from game studies and science communication to highlight how playful mechanisms can elucidate the abstract, sometimes barely perceptible changes of the climate to lay players.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vashon Island, WA: Paradoxa, 2020
Keywords
game studies, board game, climate change, science communication, ecomedia
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Media Studies and Journalism; Humanities, Visual Culture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93602 (URN)
Available from: 2020-04-19 Created: 2020-04-19 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Makai, P. K. (2020). Three Ways of Transmediating a Theme Park: Spatializing Storyworldsin Epic Mickey, the Monkey Island Series and Theme Park Management Simulators. In: Niklas Salmose, Lars Elleström (Ed.), Transmediations: Communication across Media Borders (pp. 164-185). New York & London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three Ways of Transmediating a Theme Park: Spatializing Storyworldsin Epic Mickey, the Monkey Island Series and Theme Park Management Simulators
2020 (English)In: Transmediations: Communication across Media Borders / [ed] Niklas Salmose, Lars Elleström, New York & London: Routledge, 2020, p. 164-185Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter investigates how mass entertainment venues have been transformed into digital games. Analyzing Walt Disney’s Epic Mickey, the Monkey Island adventure game series, and theme park simulators such as Rollercoaster Tycoon showcases how games can transmediate individual theme parks and rides, the cultural logic of immersion in theme parks and the economic logic of ludic capitalism, respectively. The author identifies the phenomenon of “transmediation by proxy” as an attempt to use transmediation to make the metaleptical premise of digital games more believable, and “transmediation by bootstrapping” to highlight the extranarratival motivation for some storytelling solutions in said games.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York & London: Routledge, 2020
Series
Routledge Studies in Multimodality
Keywords
video games, theme park studies, transmediation, adaptation
National Category
General Literature Studies Media and Communications Studies on Film
Research subject
Media Studies and Journalism, Media and Communication Science; Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Film Studies; Humanities, Visual Culture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93605 (URN)10.4324/9780429282775-9 (DOI)000527102100010 ()2-s2.0-85105211562 (Scopus ID)9780367244866 (ISBN)9780429282775 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-04-19 Created: 2020-04-19 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Makai, P. K. (2019). Beyond Fantastic Self-indulgence: Aesthetic Limits to World-building. In: Dimitra Fimi, Thomas Honegger (Ed.), Sub-creating Arda: World-building in J.R.R.Tolkien's Work, its Precursors, and its Legacies (pp. 57-92). Zolikofen: Walking Tree Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond Fantastic Self-indulgence: Aesthetic Limits to World-building
2019 (English)In: Sub-creating Arda: World-building in J.R.R.Tolkien's Work, its Precursors, and its Legacies / [ed] Dimitra Fimi, Thomas Honegger, Zolikofen: Walking Tree Publishers , 2019, p. 57-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Contemporary fantasy and science-fiction construct original story-worlds to distance them from the primary world of the reader. This cognitive estrangement is supposed to perform a critical function, serving as a way to comment upon the social, economic and cultural relations of the author's primary world. This paper offers a cognitively infused criticism of the emphasis laid on world-building in today's SF/F fiction. In the contemporary media landscape, the proliferation of world-building fiction is largely due to the desperate need for the limitless expansion of successful intellectual property franchises. Rather than the plausibility of character actions and story arcs, these intellectual properties depend on the plausibility of the world for their success. Contrasting M. John Harrison's Viriconium universe and Jeff VanderMeer's The Southern Reach Trilogy with the aesthetics of world-building fiction, I employ a historico-critical approach to explore the limits of inner consistency in speculative writing and the (im)possibility of these story-worlds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Zolikofen: Walking Tree Publishers, 2019
Series
Cormarë series ; 40
Keywords
world-building, Tolkien, storyworld, M. John Harrison, Viriconium, Jeff VanderMeer, The Southern Reach Trilogy
National Category
Specific Literatures
Research subject
Humanities, English literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93608 (URN)978-3-905703-40-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-04-19 Created: 2020-04-19 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Makai, P. K. (2018). Video Games as Objects and Vehicles of Nostalgia. Humanities, 7(4), Article ID 123.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Video Games as Objects and Vehicles of Nostalgia
2018 (English)In: Humanities, E-ISSN 2076-0787, Vol. 7, no 4, article id 123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Barely 50 years old, video games are among the newest media today, and still a source of fascination and a site of anxiety for cultural critics and parents. Since the 1970s, a generation of video gamers have grown up and as they began to have children of their own, video games have become objects evoking fond memories of the past. Nostalgia for simpler times is evident in the aesthetic choices game designers make: pixelated graphics, 8-bit music, and frustratingly hard levels are all reminiscent of arcade-style and third-generation console games that have been etched into the memory of Generation X. At the same time, major AAA titles have become so photorealistic and full of cinematic ambition that video games can also serve as vehicles for nostalgia by “faithfully” recreating the past. From historical recreations of major cities in the Assassin’s Creed series and L. A. Noire, to the resurrection of old art styles in 80 Days, Firewatch or Cuphead all speak of the extent to which computer gaming is suffused with a longing for pasts that never were but might have been. This paper investigates the design of games to examine how nostalgia is used to manipulate affect and player experience, and how it contributes to the themes that these computer games explore. Far from ruining video games, nostalgia nonetheless exploits the associations the players have with certain historical eras, including earlier eras of video gaming. Even so, the juxtaposition of period media and dystopic rampages or difficult levels critically comment upon the futility of nostalgia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI, 2018
Keywords
video games, nostalgia, Assassin's Creed, Cuphead, Papers Please!, Braid
National Category
Visual Arts
Research subject
Media Studies and Journalism; Humanities, Visual Culture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93606 (URN)10.3390/h7040123 (DOI)
Note

Article is part of the special issue "Contemporary Nostalgia" of the journal Humanities, ISBN 978-3-03921-557-7. The special issue is also available in a printed version, ISBN 978-3-03921-556-0 (Pbk). Edited by Niklas Salmose.

Available from: 2020-04-19 Created: 2020-04-19 Last updated: 2022-10-04Bibliographically approved
Makai, P. K. (2017). Autistic Consciousness Represented: Fictional Mental Functioning of a Different Kind. In: Teske, Joanna and Grzegorz Maziarczyk (Ed.), Explorations of Consciousness in Contemporary Fiction: (pp. 56-71). Brill Academic Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autistic Consciousness Represented: Fictional Mental Functioning of a Different Kind
2017 (English)In: Explorations of Consciousness in Contemporary Fiction / [ed] Teske, Joanna and Grzegorz Maziarczyk, Brill Academic Publishers, 2017, p. 56-71Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brill Academic Publishers, 2017
Series
Consciousness, Literature and the Arts, ISSN 1573-2193 ; 51
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72899 (URN)978-90-04-34783-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-04-17 Created: 2018-04-17 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
Makai, P. K. (2017). From Neomedievalism to Retrofuturism: A Virtual Addition to the Genealogy of the Pleasure Ground. In: Filippo Carlà-Uhink, Florian Freitag, Sabrina Mittermeier, Ariane Schwarz (Ed.), Time and Temporality in Theme Parks: (pp. 201-222). Hannover: Wehrhahn Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Neomedievalism to Retrofuturism: A Virtual Addition to the Genealogy of the Pleasure Ground
2017 (English)In: Time and Temporality in Theme Parks / [ed] Filippo Carlà-Uhink, Florian Freitag, Sabrina Mittermeier, Ariane Schwarz, Hannover: Wehrhahn Verlag, 2017, p. 201-222Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hannover: Wehrhahn Verlag, 2017
Series
Ästhetische Eigenzeiten ; 4
National Category
Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Visual Culture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-72903 (URN)9783865255488 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-04-17 Created: 2018-04-17 Last updated: 2018-05-08Bibliographically approved
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