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Kaldo, Viktor, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6443-5279
Publications (10 of 61) Show all publications
Kaldo, V., Bothelius, K., Blom, K., Lindhe, M., Larsson, M., Karimi, K., . . . Jernelov, S. (2020). An open-ended primary-care group intervention for insomnia based on a self-help book - A randomized controlled trial and 4-year follow-up. Journal of Sleep Research, 29(1), 1-9, Article ID e12881.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An open-ended primary-care group intervention for insomnia based on a self-help book - A randomized controlled trial and 4-year follow-up
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 1-9, article id e12881Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic insomnia is a common and burdensome problem for patients seeking primary care. Cognitive behavioural therapy has been shown to be effective for insomnia, also when presented with co-morbidities, but access to sleep therapists is limited. Group-treatment and self-administered treatment via self-help books have both been shown to be efficacious treatment options, and the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of an open-ended group intervention based on a self-help book for insomnia, adapted to fit a primary-care setting. Forty primary-care patients with insomnia (mean age 55 years, 80% women) were randomized to the open-ended group intervention based on a cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia self-help book or to a care as usual/wait-list control condition. Results show high attendance to group sessions and high treatment satisfaction. Participants in the control group later received the self-help book, but without the group intervention. The book-based group treatment resulted in significantly improved insomnia severity, as well as shorter sleep-onset latency, less wake time after sleep onset, and less use of sleep medication compared with treatment as usual. The improvements were sustained at a 4-year follow-up assessment. A secondary analysis found a significant advantage of the combination of the book and the open-ended group intervention compared with when the initial control group later used only the self-help book. An open-ended treatment group based on a self-help book for insomnia thus seems to be an effective and feasible intervention for chronic insomnia in primary-care settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
cognitive behavioural therapy, sleep problems
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-91023 (URN)10.1111/jsr.12881 (DOI)000505736000006 ()31184796 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Sundström, C., Eek, N., Kraepelien, M., Fahlke, C., Gajecki, M., Jakobson, M., . . . Berman, A. H. (2020). High- versus low-intensity internet interventions for alcohol use disorders: results of a three-armed randomized controlled superiority trial. Addiction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High- versus low-intensity internet interventions for alcohol use disorders: results of a three-armed randomized controlled superiority trial
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2020 (English)In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aims To test the efficacy of a therapist-guided high-intensity internet intervention compared with an unguided low-intensity internet intervention among individuals with alcohol use disorder. Design A three-group randomized controlled trial with follow-up assessments post-treatment (12 weeks) and 6 months post-randomization (primary end-point). Settings General population sample in Sweden. Participants A total of 166 on-line self-referred adults (49% males) with a score of 14 (females)/16 (males) or more on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, a preceding week alcohol consumption of 11 (females)/14 (males) or more standard drinks and an alcohol use disorder according to a diagnostic interview. Interventions and comparators Both the high- (n = 72) and low-intensity internet interventions (n = 71) consisted of modules based on relapse prevention. Controls were on a waiting-list (n = 23), and were only followed until the post-treatment follow-up. Participants were randomized at a 7 : 7 : 2 ratio. Measurements Primary outcome was self-reported alcohol consumption in the preceding week measured as (1) number of standard drinks and (2) number of heavy drinking days at the 6-month follow-up. Findings Alcohol use disorders were largely in the severe category (74.7%), with the majority of participants having had alcohol problems for more than 5 years. Attrition was 13 and 22% at the post-treatment and 6-month follow-up, respectively. At the 6-month follow-up, an intent-to-treat analysis showed no significant differences in alcohol consumption between the high- and low-intensity interventions [standard drinks d = -0.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.50 to 0.16; heavy drinking days: d = -0.07, 95% CI = -0.40 to 0.26]. Prevalence of negative effects was somewhat low (8-14%) in both intervention groups, as was deterioration (3-5%). Conclusions At 6-month follow-up, there were no significant differences between a therapist-guided high-intensity internet intervention and an unguided low-intensity internet intervention in reducing alcohol consumption among individuals with an alcohol use disorder.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
Alcohol, alcohol use disorder, internet intervention, randomized controlled trial, treatment, cognitive behavior therapy
National Category
Substance Abuse Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-91024 (URN)10.1111/add.14871 (DOI)000505321900001 ()31691413 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-01-20
Hallberg, J., Kaldo, V., Arver, S., Dhejne, C., Jokinen, J. & Oberg, K. G. (2019). A Randomized Controlled Study of Group-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Hypersexual Disorder in Men. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 16(5), 733-745
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Randomized Controlled Study of Group-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Hypersexual Disorder in Men
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Sexual Medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, E-ISSN 1743-6109, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 733-745Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Hypersexual disorder (HD) is defined as a condition in which the individual loses control over engagement in sexual behaviors, leading to distress and negative effects on key life areas. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been proven to reduce symptoms of hypersexual behavior; however, no randomized controlled study of CBT interventions for HD has been reported previously. Aim: To investigate the efficacy of group-administered CBT for HD. Methods: Male participants (n = 137) diagnosed with HD, were randomized between 7 weeks of group-administered CBT (n = 70) and a waitlist control receiving the intervention after 8 weeks (n = 67). Measurements were administered at pre-, mid-, and posttreatment, with follow-up after 3 and 6 months. Outcomes: The primary outcome was the Hypersexual Disorder: Current Assessment Scale (HD: CAS), and secondary outcomes were the Sexual Compulsivity Scale (SCS) and measures of depression (Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S), psychological distress (Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), and treatment satisfaction (CSQ-8). Results: A significantly greater decrease in HD symptoms and sexual compulsivity, as well as significantly greater improvements in psychiatric well-being, were found for the treatment condition compared with the waitlist. These effects remained stable at 3 and 6 months after treatment. Clinical Implications: CBT can ameliorate HD symptoms and psychiatric distress, suggesting that the CBT program may serve as a first-line treatment in clinical settings. Strengths & Limitations: This is the first randomized controlled study evaluating the efficacy of a CBT programin a rather large sample of HD-specific diagnosed men. The long-termtreatment effects are vague due to the low response rate on follow-up measurements, and the efficacy of this program for hypersexual women remains unknown. Conclusion: This study supports the efficacy of a group-administered CBT program as a treatment option for HD; however, future studies should include women, comprise dismantling analysis of the constituting interventions, and evaluate other treatment formats, for example, administration via the Internet. Copyright (C) 2019, International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Male Sexual Desire Disorders, Basic science male behavioral, Mental Health and Male Sexuality
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-85281 (URN)10.1016/j.jsxm.2019.03.005 (DOI)000469936400015 ()30956109 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063758494 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Forsell, E., Kraepelien, M., Blom, K., Isacsson, N., Jernelov, S., Svanborg, C., . . . Kaldo, V. (2019). Development of a very brief scale for detecting and measuring panic disorder using two items from the Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report. Journal of Affective Disorders, 257, 615-622
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a very brief scale for detecting and measuring panic disorder using two items from the Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 257, p. 615-622Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To minimize the burden in detecting and monitoring Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia by developing a very brief scale with selected items from the Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report (PDSS-SR), and to investigate the proposed scale's psychometric properties in a comorbid sample. Methods: A sample of 5103 patients from the Internet Psychiatry Clinic in Sweden, diagnosed and treated with Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder (n = 1390), social anxiety disorder (n = 1313) or depression (n = 2400), responded to the PDSS-SR. Six criteria related to factor structure, sensitivity to change and clinical representativeness were used to select items. Psychometric analyses for the selected very brief scale were performed. Results: Items 2 (distress during panic attacks) and 4 (agoraphobic avoidance), were selected to create the very brief PDSS-SR version. Correlations with the full scale were high at screening, pre and post, and for change (0.87-0.93). Categorical Omega was omega(c) = 0.74. With a cut-off of 3 points, the scale could detect panic disorder in a psychiatric sample with a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 66%. Limitations: Limitations include lack of healthy controls and lack of blinding on secondary outcome measures. Conclusion: The proposed 2-item PDSS-SR version is a good candidate for a very brief panic disorder questionnaire, both for detecting cases and for measuring change. This is especially useful in clinical settings when measuring more than one condition at a time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Psychometrics, Factor analysis, Statistical, Panic disorder, Diagnostics, Psychiatry
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89255 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.057 (DOI)000482376300077 ()31349178 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-09-24Bibliographically approved
Jernelöv, S., Larsson, Y., Llenas, M., Nasri, B. & Kaldo, V. (2019). Effects and clinical feasibility of a behavioral treatment for sleep problems in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a pragmatic within-group pilot evaluation. BMC Psychiatry, 19, 1-12, Article ID 226.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects and clinical feasibility of a behavioral treatment for sleep problems in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a pragmatic within-group pilot evaluation
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2019 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 19, p. 1-12, article id 226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundSleep disturbances, including insomnia, are common in adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Treatment of choice for insomnia is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-i), but evidence is lacking for CBT-i in patients with ADHD.The purpose of this study was to investigate if patients with insomnia and other sleep problems, at a specialist clinic for ADHD, benefit from a group delivered behavioral treatment based on CBT-i; whether insomnia severity improves following this treatment.MethodsThis pragmatic within-group pilot study with a pre to post and three-month follow-up design was set at a specialist psychiatric out-patient clinic for adult ADHD.As an adjunct to care-as-usual at the clinic, a CBT-i-based group treatment targeting several sleep problems prevalent in the ADHD-population, was offered as 10 weekly 90-min group sessions and scheduled telephone support.All outcome measures were subjectively reported by participants. Data analyzed with dependent t-tests according to intent-to-treat.ResultsNineteen patients (37 [SD 13.7] years; 68% female) with ADHD and subjectively reported sleep problems provided informed consent and pre-treatment measures. Patients had suffered from sleep problems for 15.3 [SD 13.4] years, 42% used sleep medications, 79% used stimulant medication(s).At post-treatment, insomnia severity (Insomnia Severity Index; score range 0-28) had improved with 4.5 points (95% CI, 2.06-6.99, p=.002), at 3months with 6.8 points (95% CI, 4.71-8.91, p<.0001) from pre-treatment.ConclusionsCBT-i adjusted for ADHD is promising for improving insomnia severity in adult patients at specialist psychiatric out-patient clinics, who suffer from ADHD and sleep disturbances.Trial registrationStudy registered with the Regional ethical review board in Stockholm, January 13th 2016, Study id: 2015/2078-31/1. Study registered retrospectively with Clinicaltrials.org, February 21st 2019, ID: NCT03852966.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
ADHD, Sleep problems, Behavioral treatment, Pilot evaluation
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88772 (URN)10.1186/s12888-019-2216-2 (DOI)000477043500002 ()31340804 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Rahman, M. S., Zhao, X., Liu, J. J., Torres, E. Q., Tibert, B., Kumar, P., . . . Lavebratt, C. (2019). Exercise Reduces Salivary Morning Cortisol Levels in Patients with Depression. Molecular Neuropsychiatry, 4(4), 196-203
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise Reduces Salivary Morning Cortisol Levels in Patients with Depression
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2019 (English)In: Molecular Neuropsychiatry, ISSN 2296-9209, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 196-203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose of the Study: Cortisol hypersecretion plays a role in depression pathophysiology. Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) and physical exercise (PE) are new treatment alternatives for depression, and their long-lasting effect on cortisol is unknown. We investigated cortisol level changes after 12 weeks of ICBT, PE or treatment as usual (TAU).

Procedures: The present pre-post repeated measure study analysed data derived from a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effects of 12 weeks’ interventions of ICBT, PE and TAU in depressed primary care patients (Sweden 2011–2013) and aimed at prospectively evaluating the within-group effects of ICBT, PE and TAU on diurnal salivary cortisol levels in a small representative subsample (n = 56, 38 and 27, respectively).

Results: We found a marked flattening of the diurnal cortisol slope (p = 0.004) and a reduced cortisol level at awakening (p = 0.017) after 12 weeks of PE treatment. No apparent effects of ICBT or TAU interventions were seen on diurnal cortisol levels.

Conclusions and Message: PE reduced the rate of cortisol level decline across the day in depressed adults. ICBT and TAU treatments had no detectable effects on diurnal cortisol levels. Larger samples are required for the detection and comparison of smaller effects of PE, ICBT and TAU on diurnal cortisol levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2019
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82208 (URN)10.1159/000494699 (DOI)30815455 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Safinianaini, N., Bostrom, H. & Kaldo, V. (2019). Gated Hidden Markov Models for Early Prediction of Outcome of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. In: Riano, D Wilk, S TenTeije, A (Ed.), Artificial Intelligence in Medicine, AIME 2019: . Paper presented at 17th Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Medicine (AIME), JUN 26-29, 2019, Poznan, POLAND (pp. 160-169). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gated Hidden Markov Models for Early Prediction of Outcome of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
2019 (English)In: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine, AIME 2019 / [ed] Riano, D Wilk, S TenTeije, A, Springer, 2019, p. 160-169Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Depression is a major threat to public health and its mitigation is considered to be of utmost importance. Internet-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (ICBT) is one of the employed treatments for depression. However, for the approach to be effective, it is crucial that the outcome of the treatment is accurately predicted as early as possible, to allow for its adaptation to the individual patient. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been commonly applied to characterize systematic changes in multivariate time series within health care. However, they have limited capabilities in capturing long-range interactions between emitted symbols. For the task of analyzing ICBT data, one such long-range interaction concerns the dependence of state transition on fractional change of emitted symbols. Gated Hidden Markov Models (GHMMs) are proposed as a solution to this problem. They extend standard HMMs by modifying the Expectation Maximization algorithm; for each observation sequence, the new algorithm regulates the transition probability update based on the fractional change, as specified by domain knowledge. GHMMs are compared to standard HMMs and a recently proposed approach, Inertial Hidden Markov Models, on the task of early prediction of ICBT outcome for treating depression; the algorithms are evaluated on outcome prediction, up to 7 weeks before ICBT ends. GHMMs are shown to outperform both alternative models, with an improvement of AUC ranging from 12 to 23%. These promising results indicate that considering fractional change of the observation sequence when updating state transition probabilities may indeed have a positive effect on early prediction of ICBT outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, ISSN 0302-9743 ; 11526
Keywords
Hidden Markov Models, Expectation Maximization, Depression, Internet-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90331 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-21642-9_22 (DOI)000495606500022 ()978-3-030-21642-9 (ISBN)978-3-030-21641-2 (ISBN)
Conference
17th Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Medicine (AIME), JUN 26-29, 2019, Poznan, POLAND
Available from: 2019-11-29 Created: 2019-11-29 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved
Andersson, E., Crowley, J. J., Lindefors, N., Ljotsson, B., Hedman-Lagerlöf, E., Boberg, J., . . . Ruck, C. (2019). Genetics of response to cognitive behavior therapy in adults with major depression: a preliminary report. Molecular Psychiatry, 24(4), 484-490
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetics of response to cognitive behavior therapy in adults with major depression: a preliminary report
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2019 (English)In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 484-490Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Major depressive disorder is heritable and a leading cause of disability. Cognitive behavior therapy is an effective treatment for major depression. By quantifying genetic risk scores based on common genetic variants, the aim of this report was to explore the utility of psychiatric and cognitive trait genetic risk scores, for predicting the response of 894 adults with major depressive disorder to cognitive behavior therapy. The participants were recruited in a psychiatric setting, and the primary outcome score was measured using the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale-Self Rated. Single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping arrays were used to calculate the genomic risk scores based on large genetic studies of six phenotypes: major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, intelligence, and educational attainment. Linear mixed-effect models were used to test the relationships between the six genetic risk scores and cognitive behavior therapy outcome. Our analyses yielded one significant interaction effect (B = 0.09, p < 0.001): the autism spectrum disorder genetic risk score correlated with Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale-Self Rated changes during treatment, and the higher the autism spectrum disorder genetic load, the less the depressive symptoms decreased over time. The genetic risk scores for the other psychiatric and cognitive traits were not related to depressive symptom severity or change over time. Our preliminary results indicated, as expected, that the genomics of the response of patients with major depression to cognitive behavior therapy were complex and that future efforts should aim to maximize sample size and limit subject heterogeneity in order to gain a better understanding of the use of genetic risk factors to predict treatment outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Psychology Medical Genetics
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81695 (URN)10.1038/s41380-018-0289-9 (DOI)000461902000003 ()30410065 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063194696 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-05 Created: 2019-04-05 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Kraepelien, M., Svanborg, C., Lallerstedt, L., Sennerstam, V., Lindefors, N. & Kaldo, V. (2019). Individually tailored internet treatment in routine care: A feasibility study. Paper presented at 10th Scientific Meeting of the International-Society-for-Research-on-Internet-Interventions (ISRII), FEB 13-15, 2019, Auckland, NEW ZEALAND. Internet Interventions, 18, 1-8, Article ID 100263.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individually tailored internet treatment in routine care: A feasibility study
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2019 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 18, p. 1-8, article id 100263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Disorder-specific internet treatment, based on cognitive-behavioral therapy, has been a part of routine psychiatric care in Sweden since 2007, provided at the Internet Psychiatry Clinic in Stockholm. Individually tailored treatments, with the opportunity to target more than one condition within the same treatment, has since then been evaluated in randomized trials with promising results. To introduce an individually tailored treatment into a clinical setting originally designed for disorder-specific processes creates challenges, such as how to choose the optimal treatment type for each patient. Methods: The feasibility of a proposed new routine for assessment and initiation of either a disorder-specific or an individually tailored treatment was tested on patients self-referring to the Internet Psychiatry Clinic during three weeks (N = 66), by exploring the match between comorbid problem areas and patients' preferred treatments with available disorder-specific treatment options, as well as presenting these patients' preferred problem areas to work with in individually tailored treatment, and evaluating any problems with the proposed routine. The feasibility (i.e. satisfaction, credibility, treatment activity, adherence, and preliminary symptom reductions) in the individually tailored treatment were also explored on a smaller subgroup of eight patients. Results: A majority (65%) of patients screened had at least 2 comorbid problem areas, although 25% of these comorbid patients that where allocated with the help of the proposed routine still initiated disorder-specific treatment. The proposed assessment routine functioned satisfactorily within the up and running internet clinic. The individually tailored treatment was promising regarding satisfaction, credibility, adherence, and preliminary reductions in symptoms. A notable challenge encountered was that the platform was not set up to assist with assessment process or outcome monitoring for individually tailored treatment. Conclusions: It seems feasible to combine individually tailored internet treatment and disorder-specific internet treatment within the same internet clinic. The addition of tailored treatment may prove to increase the number of patients included in treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Internet treatment, Guided self-help, Disorder-specific treatment, Individually tailored treatment, Assessment, Implementation
National Category
Psychiatry Computer and Information Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Health Informatics; Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90621 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2019.100263 (DOI)000500917500010 ()
Conference
10th Scientific Meeting of the International-Society-for-Research-on-Internet-Interventions (ISRII), FEB 13-15, 2019, Auckland, NEW ZEALAND
Available from: 2019-12-19 Created: 2019-12-19 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Nissen, E. R., O'Connor, M., Kaldo, V., Hojris, I., Borre, M., Zachariae, R. & Mehlsen, M. (2019). Internet-delivered mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial. Psycho-Oncology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-delivered mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial
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2019 (English)In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective Internet-delivered interventions may alleviate distress in cancer survivors with limited access to psychological face-to-face treatment. In collaboration with a group of cancer survivors, we developed and tested the efficacy of a therapist-assisted internet-delivered mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (iMBCT) program for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors. Methods A total of 1282 cancer survivors were screened for anxiety and depression during their routine oncology follow-up; eligible breast (n = 137) and prostate cancer (n = 13) survivors were randomized to iMBCT or care-as-usual (CAU) wait-list. Primary outcomes of anxiety and depression were assessed at baseline, 5 weeks, 10 weeks (post intervention), and 6 months. Results Significant effects were found for both anxiety (Cohen's d = 0.45; P = .017) and depressive symptoms (d = 0.42; P = .024) post intervention. The effects were maintained at follow-up for anxiety (d = 0.40; P = .029), but not for depressive symptoms (d = 0.28; P = .131). Conclusions Our preliminary findings suggest iMBCT to be a helpful intervention for cancer survivors suffering from symptoms of anxiety. Further studies on the efficacy for symptoms of depression are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
anxiety, breast cancer, cancer, cancer survivors, cognitive therapy, depressive symptoms, internet, mindfulness, oncology, prostate cancer
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90073 (URN)10.1002/pon.5237 (DOI)000493467900001 ()31600414 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2019-11-19
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6443-5279

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