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Kaldo, Viktor, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6443-5279
Publications (10 of 109) Show all publications
Blom, K., Forsell, E., Hellberg, M., Svanborg, C., Jernelov, S. & Kaldo, V. (2024). Psychological Treatment of Comorbid Insomnia and Depression: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological Treatment of Comorbid Insomnia and Depression: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial
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2024 (English)In: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, ISSN 0033-3190, E-ISSN 1423-0348Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Insomnia and depression are highly prevalent disorders and commonly occur together. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, CBT-I, has been shown to be effective in treating insomnia and also comorbid depression. However, it is unclear whether effects of CBT-I on depression are specific or nonspecific. Also, depressive symptoms often remain too high after CBT-I, indicating a need for improved treatments. The objective was to determine whether combining CBT-I with CBT for depression, without increasing treatment length, reduces both insomnia and depression more than CBT for depression with a placebo insomnia intervention. Methods: A 12-week double-blind randomized controlled trial with a 6-month follow-up in a psychiatric setting using therapist-guided internet-delivered treatments was conducted. Patients (N = 126) were diagnosed with insomnia disorder and major depression by physicians. Primary outcome measures were as follows: self-rating scales Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and Montgomery-angstrom sberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S). Results: The combined treatment showed specific effects on insomnia severity over the control treatment (p = 0.007) but was not more effective in reducing depression severity. Within-group effects (Cohen's d) at post and at 6 months were as follows: ISI 1.40 and 1.42 (combined treatment), 0.95 and 1.00 (control); MADRS-S 0.97 and 1.12 (combined), 0.88 and 0.89 (control). Conclusions: CBT-I shows large specific effects on insomnia severity and is superior to control in this regard. Both treatments had similar effects on depression severity, i.e., combining CBT-I with CBT for depression did not enhance outcomes on depression compared to control. We suggest CBT-I should always be offered to patients with insomnia and depression comorbidity, possibly as the first-hand choice. Combining it with a psychological treatment for depression could be too burdening and may not be beneficial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2024
Keywords
Insomnia, Depression, Comorbidity, Psychological treatment, Randomized controlled trial
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127888 (URN)10.1159/000536063 (DOI)001154403300001 ()38286128 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85184473854 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-20 Created: 2024-02-20 Last updated: 2024-02-20
Gervind, E., Ben Salem, M., Svanborg, C., Nyström, M. E., Lilja, J., Kaldo, V. & Weineland, S. (2024). The influence of organizational models on the implementation of internet-based cognitive behavior therapy in primary care: A mixed methods study using the RE-AIM framework. Internet Interventions, 35, Article ID 100698.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of organizational models on the implementation of internet-based cognitive behavior therapy in primary care: A mixed methods study using the RE-AIM framework
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2024 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 35, article id 100698Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (iCBT) holds great potential in addressing mental health issues, yet its real-world implementation poses significant challenges. While prior research has predominantly focused on centralized care models, this study explores the implementation of iCBT in the context of decentralized organizational structures within the Swedish primary care setting, where all interventions traditionally are delivered at local Primary Care Centers (PCCs).Aim: This study aims to enhance our understanding of iCBT implementation in primary care and assess the impact of organizational models on the implementation's outcome using the RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) framework.Method: A mixed-methods research design was employed to identify the factors influencing iCBT implementation across different levels, involving patients, therapists and managers. Data spanning two years was collected and analyzed through thematic analysis and statistical tests. The study encompassed 104 primary care centers, with patient data (n = 1979) sourced from the Swedish National Quality Register for Internet-Based Psychological Treatment (SibeR). Additionally, 53 iCBT therapists and 50 PCC managers completed the Normalization Measure Development Questionnaire, and 15 leaders participated in interviews.Results: Our investigation identified two implementation approaches, one concentrated and one decentralized. Implementation effectiveness was evident through adherence rates suggesting that iCBT is a promising approach for treating mental ill-health in primary care, although challenges were observed concerning patient assessment and therapist drift towards unstructured treatment. Mandatory implementation, along with managerial and organizational support, positively impacted adoption. Results vary in terms of adherence to established protocols, with therapists working in concentrated model showing a significantly higher percentage of registration in the quality register SibeR (X2 (1, N = 2973) = 430.5774, p = 0.001). They also showed significantly higher means in cognitive participation (Z = - 2.179, p = 0.029) and in reflective monitoring (Z = - 2.548, p = 0.011). Discussion: Overall, the study results demonstrate that iCBT, as a complex and qualitatively different intervention from traditional psychological treatment, can be widely implemented in primary care settings. The study's key finding highlights the substantial advantages of the concentrated organizational model. This model has strengths in sustainability, encourages reflective monitoring among therapists, the use of quality registers, and enforces established protocols.Conclusion: In conclusion, this study significantly contributes to the understanding of the practical aspects associated with the implementation of complex internet interventions, particularly in the context of internetbased cognitive-behavioral therapy (iCBT). The study highlights that effective iCBT integration into primary care requires a multifaceted approach, taking into account organizational models, robust support structures, and a commitment to maintaining quality standards. By emphasizing these factors, our research aims to provide actionable insights that can enhance the practicability and real-world applicability of implementing iCBT in primary care settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy, iCBT, Implementation science, Complex intervention, Primary care, RE-AIM framework, Organizational models, Support structures, Quality work, Practical implementation, Healthcare innovation
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-127392 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2023.100698 (DOI)001138443100001 ()38174208 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180360801 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-01 Created: 2024-02-01 Last updated: 2024-02-01
Rosén, A., D’Onofrio, P., Kaldo, V., Åkerstedt, T. & Jernelöv, S. (2023). A comparison of sleep restriction and sleep compression on objective measures of sleep: A sub-sample from a large randomised controlled trial. Journal of Sleep Research, 32(4), Article ID e13826.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of sleep restriction and sleep compression on objective measures of sleep: A sub-sample from a large randomised controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 32, no 4, article id e13826Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sleep restriction therapy is a central component of cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia, but can lead to excessive sleepiness, which may impede treatment adherence. Sleep compression therapy has been suggested as a possibly gentler alternative. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of sleep restriction therapy and sleep compression therapy on objective measures of sleep, with a focus on magnitude and timing of effects. From a larger study of participants with insomnia, a sub-sample of 36 underwent polysomnographic recordings, before being randomised to either sleep restriction (n = 19) or sleep compression (n = 17) and receiving online treatment for 10 weeks. Assessments with polysomnography were also carried out after 2, 5, and 10 weeks of treatment. Data were analysed with multilevel linear mixed effect modelling. As per treatment instructions, participants in sleep restriction initially spent shorter time in bed compared with sleep compression. Participants in sleep restriction also showed an initial decrease of total sleep time, which was not seen in the sleep compression group. Both treatments led to improvements in sleep continuity variables, with a tendency for the improvements to come earlier during treatment in sleep restriction. No substantial differences were found between the two treatments 10 weeks after the treatment start. The results indicate that homeostatic sleep pressure may not be as important as a mechanism in sleep compression therapy as in sleep restriction therapy, and an investigation of other mechanisms is needed. In conclusion, the treatments led to similar changes in objective sleep at a somewhat different pace, and possibly through different mechanisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
antidepressant agent, herbaceous agent, hypnotic agent, sedative agent, adult, Article, clinical article, cognitive behavioral therapy, comparative effectiveness, controlled study, depression, exploratory research, female, human, insomnia, male, middle aged, number of awakening index, patient compliance, polysomnography, randomized controlled trial (topic), REM sleep, sleep compression therapy, sleep deprivation, sleep efficiency, sleep latency, sleep medicine, sleep parameters, sleep pattern, sleep pressure, sleep restriction therapy, sleep therapy, sleep time, slow wave sleep, stage 1 sleep, stage 2 sleep, time in bed, treatment outcome, treatment response, wake after sleep onset
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-123725 (URN)10.1111/jsr.13826 (DOI)000921347700001 ()2-s2.0-85147308137 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-15 Created: 2023-08-15 Last updated: 2023-09-07Bibliographically approved
Ponten, M., Jonsjo, M., Vadenmark, V., Moberg, E., Grannas, D., Andersson, G., . . . Jensen, K. (2023). Association between expectations and clinical outcomes in online v. face-to-face therapy - an individual participant data meta-analysis. Psychological Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between expectations and clinical outcomes in online v. face-to-face therapy - an individual participant data meta-analysis
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2023 (English)In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background. Online treatments are increasing in number and are currently available for a wide range of clinical problems. To date little is known about the role of treatment expectations and other placebo-like mechanisms in online settings compared to traditional face-to-face treatment. To address this knowledge gap, we analyzed individual participant data from randomized clinical trials that compared online and face-to-face psychological interventions.Methods. MEDLINE (Ovid) and PsycINFO (Ovid) were last searched on 2 February 2021. Randomized clinical trials of therapist guided online v. face-to-face psychological interventions for psychiatric or somatic conditions using a randomized controlled design were included. Titles, abstracts, and full texts of studies were independently screened by multiple observers. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guideline was followed. Authors of the matching trials were contacted for individual participant data. Ratings from the Credibility and Expectancy Questionnaire and the primary outcome measure from each trial were used to estimate the association between expectation ratings and treatment outcomes in online v. face-to-face interventions, using a mixed-effects model.Results. Of 7045 screened studies, 62 full-text articles were retrieved whereof six studies fulfilled the criteria and provided individual participant data (n = 491). Overall, CEQ ratings predicted clinical outcomes (beta = 0.27) at end of treatment with no moderating effect of treatment modality (online v. face-to-face).Conclusions. Online treatment appears to be equally susceptible to expectancy effects as face-to-face therapy. This furthers our understanding of the importance of placebo-like factors in online treatment and may aid the improvement of healthcare in online settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2023
Keywords
Treatment expectation, online therapy, face-to-face therapy, CEQ, randomized clinical trials, individual participant data meta-analysis
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125918 (URN)10.1017/S0033291723003033 (DOI)001096093600001 ()37905404 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176085748 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-08 Created: 2023-12-08 Last updated: 2023-12-08
Eek, N., Sundström, C., Kraepelien, M., Lundgren, J., Kaldo, V. & Berman, A. H. (2023). High- versus low-intensity internet interventions for alcohol use disorders (AUD): A two-year follow-up of a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Internet Interventions, 33, Article ID 100630.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High- versus low-intensity internet interventions for alcohol use disorders (AUD): A two-year follow-up of a single-blind randomized controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 33, article id 100630Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alcohol Use Disorders (AUD) are widespread and have serious consequences, but are among the most undertreated mental disorders. Internet interventions have been found effective in treating AUD, but we know little about long-term outcomes, two years or more after treatment. This study explored 12- and 24-month outcomes in alcohol consumption following initial 6-month improvements after a therapist-guided high-intensity internet intervention and an unguided low-intensity internet intervention among individuals with alcohol use disorder. Between-group comparisons were analyzed, as well as within-group comparisons with (1) pre-treatment measurements (2) post-treatment measurements. Participants consisted of a general population sample of internet help-seekers in Sweden. A total of 143 adults (47% men) with a score of 14 (women)/16 (men) or more on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, alcohol consumption of 11 (women)/14 (men) or more standard drinks the preceding week and & GE; 2 DSM-5 alcohol use disorder (AUD) criteria based on a diagnostic interview were included. The high- and low-intensity internet interventions (n = 72 and n = 71 respectively) consisted of modules based on relapse prevention and cognitive-behavioral therapy. The primary outcome was self-reported alcohol consumption in the preceding week measured as (1) number of standard drinks and (2) number of heavy drinking days. Attrition from self-reported questionnaires was 36% at the 12-month follow-up and 53% at the 24month follow-up. No significant between-group differences occurred in outcomes at either long-term follow-up. Regarding within-group differences, compared to pre-treatment, alcohol consumption was lower in both highand low-intensity interventions at both long-term follow-ups [within-group standard drinks effect sizes varied between g = 0.38-1.04 and heavy drinking days effect sizes varied between g = 0.65-0.94]. Compared to posttreatment, within-group alcohol consumption in the high intensity intervention increased at both follow-ups; for the low-intensity intervention, within-group consumption decreased at 12-month follow-up, but did not differ compared to post-treatment at 24 months. Both high- and low-intensity internet interventions for AUD were thus associated with overall reductions in alcohol consumption at long term follow-ups, with no significant differences between the two. However, conclusions are hampered by differential and non-differential attrition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Alcohol, Alcohol use disorder, Cognitive behavior therapy, Long -term follow-up, Internet intervention
National Category
Substance Abuse
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-124139 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2023.100630 (DOI)001053623700001 ()37293578 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160563818 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-08 Created: 2023-09-08 Last updated: 2023-11-21Bibliographically approved
Karlsson-Good, M., Kaldo, V., Lundberg, L., Kraepelien, M., Anthony, S. A. & Holländare, F. (2023). Increasing the accessibility to internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for depression: A single-blind randomized controlled trial of condensed versus full-text versions. Internet Interventions, 34, Article ID 100678.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increasing the accessibility to internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for depression: A single-blind randomized controlled trial of condensed versus full-text versions
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2023 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 34, article id 100678Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Research shows that internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) is an effective treatment for depression. However, little is known about how the length of the text material in iCBT affects outcomes. Objective: The aim of this study was to test whether a condensed iCBT version for depression would be noninferior to the existing full-text version in reducing depressive symptoms at post-treatment. We also wanted to test non-inferiority for secondary outcomes and explore reading speed and ADHD symptoms as potential moderators. Method: A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted (N = 267) comparing two versions of guided iCBT for depression; full-text (around 60,000 words) and condensed (around 30,000 words, with the option to listen to the text). Estimated between-group effect sizes and their confidence intervals for depression, anxiety and quality of life, were compared to a pre-determined non-inferiority margin (ES = 0.4). Moderation analyses of reading speed and ADHD symptoms were conducted. Results: The condensed version of iCBT was non-inferior to the full-text version on post-treatment measures for depressive symptoms (95 % CI = - 0.42-0.24), anxiety symptoms (95 % CI = - 0.24-0.32), and quality of life (95 % CI = - 0.09-0.49). Non-inferiority was inconclusive for depressive symptoms at the one-year follow-up (95 % CI = - 0.60-0.47). There was no significant moderation effects of reading speed (p = 0.06) or ADHD symptoms (p = 0.11) on depressive symptoms. Conclusion: These results indicate that a condensed version of iCBT for depression is as effective at treating depression as the full-text version. By shortening texts, iCBT may be made available to more people. Due to unequal dropout rates between the groups, these results are preliminary and need to be replicated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Cognitive behavioural therapy, Depressive disorder, Reading speed, Digital intervention, Internet-based treatment, Randomized controlled trial
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125626 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2023.100678 (DOI)001088984100001 ()37840646 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173161250 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-15 Created: 2023-11-15 Last updated: 2023-11-21Bibliographically approved
Nasri, B., Cassel, M., Enharje, J., Larsson, M., Hirvikoski, T., Ginsberg, Y., . . . Kaldo, V. (2023). Internet delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with ADHD - A randomized controlled trial. Internet Interventions, 33, Article ID 100636.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with ADHD - A randomized controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 33, article id 100636Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evidence-based psychological interventions for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are seldom available in clinical settings. Medication is often offered as the sole treatment, with non-optimal effects for a majority of patients. The objective was to compare internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) to an active control treatment of internet-based applied relaxation training (iART), and to treatment as usual only (TAU) in adult outpatients with ADHD. One hundred and four patients, of which 67 % used ADHD medication, were randomized to 12 weeks of iCBT (n = 36), iART (n = 37), or TAU (n = 31). Primary outcome was change in the Adult ADHD Self Report Scale (ASRS) up to 3 (FU3) and 12 months (FU12) after treatment. ASRS improved more for iCBT (p < .01; Cohen's d = 0.42 at post-treatment and 0.67 at FU3) and iART (p < .01; Cohen's d = 0.57 at post-treatment and 0.66 at FU3) than for TAU. The effects sustained over 12 months for iCBT (p < .001) and iART (p < .001). No significant difference was found when comparing iCBT to iART (p = .53). Treatment responders reached 25 % for both treatments, which was superior to the 3 % responders in TAU (p < .05). iCBT and iART could both be promising add-ons to medication and increase availability to psychological treatment with sustained symptom reductions after one year.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
ADHD, Adults, Internet, RCT, Cognitive behavior therapy, iCBT, Dialectical behavior therapy
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125041 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2023.100636 (DOI)001059841800001 ()37483263 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85164291314 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-05 Created: 2023-10-05 Last updated: 2023-11-21Bibliographically approved
Farnsworth von Cederwald, A., Lilja, J. L., Isacsson, N. H. & Kaldo, V. (2023). Primary Care Behavioral Health in Sweden - a protocol of a cluster randomized trial evaluating outcomes related to implementation, organization, and patients (KAIROS). BMC Health Services Research, 23(1), Article ID 1188.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Primary Care Behavioral Health in Sweden - a protocol of a cluster randomized trial evaluating outcomes related to implementation, organization, and patients (KAIROS)
2023 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundProviding comprehensive and continuous care for patients whose conditions have mental or behavioral components is a central challenge in primary care and an important part of improving universal health coverage. There is a great need for high and routine availability of psychological interventions, but traditional methods for delivering psychotherapy often result in low reach and long wait times. Primary Care Behavioral Health (PCBH) is a method for organizing primary care in which behavioral health staff provide brief, flexible interventions to a large part of the population in active collaboration with other providers. While PCBH holds promise in addressing important challenges, it has not yet been thoroughly evaluated.MethodsThis cluster randomized trial will assess 17 primary care centers (PCCs) that are starting a PCBH implementation process. The PCCs will be divided into two groups, with one starting immediate implementation and the other acting as a control, implementing six months later. The purpose of the study is to strengthen the evidence base for PCBH regarding implementation-, organization-, and patient-level outcomes, taking into consideration that there is a partially dependent relationship between the three levels. Patient outcomes (such as increased daily functioning and reduction of symptoms) may be dependent on organizational changes (such as availability of treatment, waiting times and interprofessional teamwork), which in turn requires change in implementation outcomes (most notably, model fidelity). In addition to the main analysis, five secondary analyses will compare groups based on different combinations of randomization and time periods, specifically before and after each center achieves sufficient PCBH fidelity.DiscussionA randomized comparison of PCBH and traditional primary care has, to our knowledge, not been made before. While the naturalistic setting and the intricacies of implementation pose certain challenges, we have designed this study in an effort to evaluate the causal effects of PCBH despite these complex aspects. The results of this project will be helpful in guiding decisions on how to organize the delivery of behavioral interventions and psychological treatment within the context of primary care in Sweden and elsewhere.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov: NCT05335382. Retrospectively registered on March 13th, 2022.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
PCBH, Primary care behavioral health, Primary care, Integrated care, Behavioral health, Mental health, Implementation, Cluster randomization
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125831 (URN)10.1186/s12913-023-10180-9 (DOI)001094376700004 ()37907899 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175675677 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
Boberg, J., Kaldo, V., Mataix-Cols, D., Crowley, J. J., Roelstraete, B., Halvorsen, M., . . . Ruck, C. (2023). Swedish multimodal cohort of patients with anxiety or depression treated with internet-delivered psychotherapy (MULTI-PSYCH). BMJ Open, 13(10), Article ID e069427.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish multimodal cohort of patients with anxiety or depression treated with internet-delivered psychotherapy (MULTI-PSYCH)
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2023 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 10, article id e069427Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose Depression and anxiety afflict millions worldwide causing considerable disability. MULTI-PSYCH is a longitudinal cohort of genotyped and phenotyped individuals with depression or anxiety disorders who have undergone highly structured internet-based cognitive-behaviour therapy (ICBT). The overarching purpose of MULTI-PSYCH is to improve risk stratification, outcome prediction and secondary preventive interventions. MULTI-PSYCH is a precision medicine initiative that combines clinical, genetic and nationwide register data.Participants MULTI-PSYCH includes 2668 clinically well-characterised adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) (n=1300), social anxiety disorder (n=640) or panic disorder (n=728) assessed before, during and after 12 weeks of ICBT at the internet psychiatry clinic in Stockholm, Sweden. All patients have been blood sampled and genotyped. Clinical and genetic data have been linked to several Swedish registers containing a wide range of variables from patient birth up to 10 years after the end of ICBT. These variable types include perinatal complications, school grades, psychiatric and somatic comorbidity, dispensed medications, medical interventions and diagnoses, healthcare and social benefits, demographics, income and more. Long-term follow-up data will be collected through 2029.Findings to date Initial uses of MULTI-PSYCH include the discovery of an association between PRS for autism spectrum disorder and response to ICBT, the development of a machine learning model for baseline prediction of remission status after ICBT in MDD and data contributions to genome wide association studies for ICBT outcome. Other projects have been launched or are in the planning phase.Future plans The MULTI-PSYCH cohort provides a unique infrastructure to study not only predictors or short-term treatment outcomes, but also longer term medical and socioeconomic outcomes in patients treated with ICBT for depression or anxiety. MULTI-PSYCH is well positioned for research collaboration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Anxiety disorders, Depression & mood disorders, GENETICS, EPIDEMIOLOGY
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125444 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2022-069427 (DOI)001081277700003 ()37793927 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173654320 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-02 Created: 2023-11-02 Last updated: 2023-11-02Bibliographically approved
d'Onofrio, P., Jernelov, S., Rosen, A., Blom, K., Kaldo, V., Schwarz, J. & Åkerstedt, T. (2023). The Polysomnographical Meaning of Changed Sleep Quality - A Study of Treatment with Reduced Time in Bed. Brain Sciences, 13(10), Article ID 1426.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Polysomnographical Meaning of Changed Sleep Quality - A Study of Treatment with Reduced Time in Bed
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2023 (English)In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 13, no 10, article id 1426Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Reports of poor sleep are widespread, but their link with objective sleep (polysomnography-PSG) is weak in cross-sectional studies. In contrast, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between changes in subjective and objective sleep variables using data from a study of the reduction in time in bed (TIB). Methods: One sleep recording was carried out at baseline and one at treatment week 5 (end of treatment) (N = 34). Results: The Karolinska Sleep Quality Index improved and was correlated with improvement in sleep efficiency (r = 0.41, p < 0.05) and reduction in TIB (r = -0.47, p < 0.01) and sleep latency (r = 0.36, p < 0.05). The restorative sleep index showed similar results. Improvements in the insomnia severity index (ISI) essentially lacked correlations with changes in the PSG variables. It was suggested that the latter may be due to the ISI representing a week of subjective sleep experience, of which a single PSG night may not be representative. Conclusions: It was concluded that changes in the subjective ratings of sleep are relatively well associated with changes in the PSG-based sleep continuity variables when both describe the same sleep.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
subjective sleep, objective sleep, ratings, PSG, sleep restriction, sleep compression
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-125916 (URN)10.3390/brainsci13101426 (DOI)001098274900001 ()37891794 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175447227 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-08 Created: 2023-12-08 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6443-5279

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