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Tamario, Carl
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Tamario, C., Calles, O., Watz, J., Nilsson, P. A. & Degerman, E. (2019). Coastal river connectivity and the distribution of ascending juvenile European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.): Implications for conservation strategies regarding fish-passage solutions. Aquatic conservation, 29(4), 612-622
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coastal river connectivity and the distribution of ascending juvenile European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.): Implications for conservation strategies regarding fish-passage solutions
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2019 (English)In: Aquatic conservation, ISSN 1052-7613, E-ISSN 1099-0755, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 612-622Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many diadromous fish populations are declining and at risk of collapse. Lack of river connectivity is a major contributor to these declines, as free migration routes between marine and freshwater habitats are crucial for life-history completion. For the conservation and ultimately recovery of such species, it is imperative that remedial measures aimed at increasing connectivity are effective. This study investigated the distribution patterns of ascending juvenile European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) in rivers in south-western Sweden, with a focus on the effects of barriers and measures that aim to reduce the impact of barriers, i.e. fish-passage solutions (FPSs). Eel occurrence data were spatially and temporally integrated with the national databases of dams and FPSs in a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment to evaluate their effect on ascending eel distribution. The types of barriers assessed were: (i) dams with nature-like fishways; (ii) dams with eel ramps; (iii) dams with technical fishways; and (iv) dams without FPSs. Dams fitted with eel ramps or technical fishways, as well as dams without FPSs, produced a significant negative effect on the probability of eel occurrence upstream. This negative effect was not found for dams fitted with nature-like fishways, indicating that these solutions may function better than the other FPS types in this study. The probability of eel occurrence decreased with distance from the sea and increased with area sampled, number of electrofishing runs, water temperature, and with the size of the bottom substrate. We suggest that future conservation strategies for improving the natural immigration of juvenile eels should include optimizing FPS function (e.g. placement and design), the continued maintenance of FPSs, the construction of nature-like fishways, and preferably the removal of dams, which will also benefit the downstream migration of maturing eels as well as restoring other ecosystem services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
barriers, dams, dispersal, eel ladders, eel management, electrofishing, fish passage, fishways, ramps
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-83644 (URN)10.1002/aqc.3064 (DOI)000465962300010 ()2-s2.0-85061830487 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Donadi, S., Sandin, L., Tamario, C. & Degerman, E. (2019). Country-wide analysis of large wood as a driver of fish abundance in Swedish streams: Which species benefit and where?. Aquatic conservation, 29(5), 706-716
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Country-wide analysis of large wood as a driver of fish abundance in Swedish streams: Which species benefit and where?
2019 (English)In: Aquatic conservation, ISSN 1052-7613, E-ISSN 1099-0755, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 706-716Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rivers are heavily affected by human impacts that threaten many fish species. Among restoration measures, the addition of large wood (LW) in streams has been shown to increase fish abundance, yet which species benefit from LW, to what extent relative to other drivers, and which factors influence LW quantity is not clear, and these uncertainties limit our ability to use LW as an effective restoration measure. Here, a time series (from 1993 to 2016) of electrofishing data, including 3641 streams across Sweden, was used to investigate the beneficial effects of LW on the abundance of juvenile brown trout, Salmo trutta, juvenile Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, and juvenile and adult sculpins, Cottus gobio and Cottus poecilopus, while accounting for other abiotic and biotic factors, and the drivers of LW abundance at a country-wide scale. Large wood benefitted brown trout, and the effects were greater with decreasing shaded stream surface. LW effects were comparable in magnitude to the positive effects of average annual air temperature and the negative effects of stream depth and predator abundance - factors where the influence was second only to the negative effects of stream width. LW did not benefit salmon abundance, which was correlated positively with stream width and negatively with altitude, nor did it benefit sculpin abundances, which mainly decreased with annual average air temperature and altitude. The quantity of LW strongly diminished with stream width, and, to a lesser extent, with stream depth, altitude, annual average air temperature, and forest age, whereas it increased with stream velocity, slope, and forest cover. The results suggest that LW can be used as an effective restoration tool for brown trout in shallow and narrow streams, especially in areas with little shade. Here, the addition of LW may help to alleviate the impacts of forest clearance and climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Cottus gobio, Cottus poecilopus, path analysis, river restoration, Salmo salar, Salmo trutta
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86863 (URN)10.1002/aqc.3107 (DOI)000470934800004 ()2-s2.0-85065675831 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Tamario, C., Sunde, J., Petersson, E., Tibblin, P. & Forsman, A. (2019). Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Environmental Change and Management Actions for Migrating Fish. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 7, 1-24, Article ID 271.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Environmental Change and Management Actions for Migrating Fish
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 7, p. 1-24, article id 271Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Migration strategies in fishes comprise a rich, ecologically important, and socioeconomically valuable example of biological diversity. The variation and flexibility in migration is evident between and within individuals, populations, and species, and thereby provides a useful model system that continues to inform how ecological and evolutionary processes mold biodiversity and how biological systems respond to environmental heterogeneity and change. Migrating fishes are targeted by commercial and recreational fishing and impact the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Sadly, many species of migrating fish are under increasing threat by exploitation, pollution, habitat destruction, dispersal barriers, overfishing, and ongoing climate change that brings modified, novel, more variable and extreme conditions and selection regimes. All this calls for protection, sustainable utilization and adaptive management. However, the situation for migrating fishes is complicated further by actions aimed at mitigating the devastating effects of such threats. Changes in river connectivity associated with removal of dispersal barriers such as dams and construction of fishways, together with compensatory breeding, and supplemental stocking can impact on gene flow and selection. How this in turn affects the dynamics, genetic structure, genetic diversity, evolutionary potential, and viability of spawning migrating fish populations remains largely unknown. In this narrative review we describe and discuss patterns, causes, and consequences of variation and flexibility in fish migration that are scientifically interesting and concern key issues within the framework of evolution and maintenance of biological diversity. We showcase how the evolutionary solutions to key questions that define migrating fish-whether or not to migrate, why to migrate, where to migrate, and when to migrate-may depend on individual characteristics and ecological conditions. We explore links between environmental change and migration strategies, and discuss whether and how threats associated with overexploitation, environmental makeovers, and management actions may differently influence vulnerability of individuals, populations, and species depending on the variation and flexibility of their migration strategies. Our goal is to provide a broad overview of knowledge in this emerging area, spur future research, and development of informed management, and ultimately promote sustainable utilization and protection of migrating fish and their ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
biodiversity, climate change, developmental plasticity, evolution, fish migration, fishway, phenotypic flexibility, spawning migration
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology; Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86980 (URN)10.3389/fevo.2019.00271 (DOI)000474916900001 ()
Available from: 2019-07-25 Created: 2019-07-25 Last updated: 2019-07-25Bibliographically approved
Tamario, C., Sunde, J., Petersson, E., Tibblin, P. & Forsman, A. (2019). Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Environmental Change and Management Actions for Migrating Fish. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 7, 1-24, Article ID 271.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Environmental Change and Management Actions for Migrating Fish
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 7, p. 1-24, article id 271Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Migration strategies in fishes comprise a rich, ecologically important, and socioeconomically valuable example of biological diversity. The variation and flexibility in migration is evident between and within individuals, populations, and species, and thereby provides a useful model system that continues to inform how ecological and evolutionary processes mold biodiversity and how biological systems respond to environmental heterogeneity and change. Migrating fishes are targeted by commercial and recreational fishing and impact the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Sadly, many species of migrating fish are under increasing threat by exploitation, pollution, habitat destruction, dispersal barriers, overfishing, and ongoing climate change that brings modified, novel, more variable and extreme conditions and selection regimes. All this calls for protection, sustainable utilization and adaptive management. However, the situation for migrating fishes is complicated further by actions aimed at mitigating the devastating effects of such threats. Changes in river connectivity associated with removal of dispersal barriers such as dams and construction of fishways, together with compensatory breeding, and supplemental stocking can impact on gene flow and selection. How this in turn affects the dynamics, genetic structure, genetic diversity, evolutionary potential, and viability of spawning migrating fish populations remains largely unknown. In this narrative review we describe and discuss patterns, causes, and consequences of variation and flexibility in fish migration that are scientifically interesting and concern key issues within the framework of evolution and maintenance of biological diversity. We showcase how the evolutionary solutions to key questions that define migrating fish-whether or not to migrate, why to migrate, where to migrate, and when to migrate-may depend on individual characteristics and ecological conditions. We explore links between environmental change and migration strategies, and discuss whether and how threats associated with overexploitation, environmental makeovers, and management actions may differently influence vulnerability of individuals, populations, and species depending on the variation and flexibility of their migration strategies. Our goal is to provide a broad overview of knowledge in this emerging area, spur future research, and development of informed management, and ultimately promote sustainable utilization and protection of migrating fish and their ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
biodiversity, climate change, developmental plasticity, evolution, fish migration, fishway, phenotypic flexibility, spawning migration
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology; Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88369 (URN)10.3389/fevo.2019.00271 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Gothe, E., Degerman, E., Sandin, L., Segersten, J., Tamario, C. & Mckie, B. G. (2019). Flow restoration and the impacts of multiple stressors on fish communities in regulated rivers. Journal of Applied Ecology, 56(7), 1687-1702
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flow restoration and the impacts of multiple stressors on fish communities in regulated rivers
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Applied Ecology, ISSN 0021-8901, E-ISSN 1365-2664, Vol. 56, no 7, p. 1687-1702Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

River regulation for hydropower is undertaken worldwide, causing profound alterations to hydrological regimes and running water habitats. Regulated catchments are often subjected to additional stressors, arising inter alia from agriculture, forestry and industry, which are likely to interact with impacts of river regulation on fish and other biota. Such interactions are poorly understood, hindering planning of effective mitigation and restoration. We investigated fish responses to increased discharge (as a restoration measure) in regulated rivers in Sweden. We compiled electrofishing data from river channels downstream of hydropower dams, each of which either has or lacks a mandated minimum discharge corresponding to c. 5% of pre-regulation discharge. We further analysed interactions between flow restoration and co-occurring local and regional stressors. River channels without a mandated minimum discharge were characterized by a low diversity of fish species with traits favouring persistence under unpredictable environmental conditions, including omnivory, short life cycles and small size. Additional stressors further reduced diversity and increased dominance by broad-niched, opportunistic species. Both the presence and magnitude of a mandated minimum discharge were positively related to fish diversity and density, and the relative density of three economically and recreationally valuable species. However, the size of these relationships frequently varied with the presence of additional stressors. Increasing levels of hydrological degradation and reduced connectivity at the catchment scale reduced positive flow-ecology relationships and hindered the restoration of fish communities towards reference conditions. However, application of a mandated minimum discharge also assisted in mitigating impacts of some co-occurring stressors, especially reduced riparian integrity. Synthesis and applications. Additional stressors can strongly influence the outcomes of flow restoration for fish community diversity and composition. Our approach combining fish species and trait data from multiple flow restoration projects with information on additional stressors yielded valuable insights into factors affecting flow restoration success, useful for (a) identifying the systems most likely to benefit from mandated minimum flows, (b) modelling influences of multiple stressors on flow-ecology relationships, (c) prioritizing additional measures to manage co-occurring stressors and enhance outcomes from flow restoration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
bypassed river channels, ELOHA, hydropower, minimum flow, regulated rivers, riparian degradation, stressor interactions, traits
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86988 (URN)10.1111/1365-2664.13413 (DOI)000474270200016 ()2-s2.0-85066486811 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-25 Created: 2019-07-25 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Sunde, J., Tamario, C., Tibblin, P., Larsson, P. & Forsman, A. (2018). Variation in salinity tolerance between and within anadromous subpopulations of pike (Esox lucius). Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variation in salinity tolerance between and within anadromous subpopulations of pike (Esox lucius)
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental heterogeneity is a key determinant of genetic and phenotypic diversity. Stable andhomogenous environments tends to result in evolution of specialism and local adaptations, whiletemporally unpredictable environments may maintain a diversity of specialists, promote generaliststrategies, or favour diversified bet hedging strategies. We compared salinity tolerance between twoanadromous subpopulations of pike (Esox Lucius) that utilize freshwater spawning sites with differentsalinity regimes. Eggs from each population were artificially fertilized and incubated in a salinitygradient (0, 3, 5, 7, and 9 psu) using a split-brood design. Effects on embryonic development, hatchingsuccess, survival of larvae, and fry body length were compared between populations and families.The population naturally spawning in the stable freshwater habitat showed signs of specialization forfreshwater spawning. The population exposed to fluctuating selective pressure in a spawning area withoccasional brackish water intrusions tolerated higher salinities and displayed considerable variation inreaction norms. Genetic differences and plasticity of salinity tolerance may enable populations to copewith changes in salinity regimes associated with future climate change. That geographically adjacentsubpopulations can constitute separate units with different genetic characteristics must be consideredin management and conservation efforts to avoid potentially negative effects of genetic admixture onpopulation fitness and persistence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69620 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-18413-8 (DOI)000419441300022 ()29311634 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040446275 (Scopus ID)
Note

Author Correction: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-24805-1

The original version of this Article contained an error in the title of the paper, where the word “lucius” was incorrectly given as “1ucius”. This has now been corrected in the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.

Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
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