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Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Höckert, E. (2019). Case 4.4: Responsible tourism development in San Ramón, Nicaragua. In: Tazim Jamal (Ed.), Justice and ethics in tourism: (pp. 134-142). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case 4.4: Responsible tourism development in San Ramón, Nicaragua
2019 (English)In: Justice and ethics in tourism / [ed] Tazim Jamal, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 134-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2019
Series
Tourism, Environment and Development Series
Keywords
Tourism, Responsibility, Justice, Ethics, Development, Levinas, Nicaragua
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79274 (URN)10.4324/9781315162942 (DOI)9781138060715 (ISBN)9781138060708 (ISBN)9781315162942 (ISBN)
Note

Case Study

Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Höckert, E. (2019). Case 7.1: Smell the melting Arctic ice. In: Tazim Jamal (Ed.), Justice and ethics in tourism: (pp. 236-238). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case 7.1: Smell the melting Arctic ice
2019 (English)In: Justice and ethics in tourism / [ed] Tazim Jamal, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 236-238Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2019
Series
Tourism, Environment and Development Series
Keywords
Tourism, Justice, Climate change, Arctic, Research
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79273 (URN)9781138060715 (ISBN)9781138060708 (ISBN)9781315162942 (ISBN)
Note

Case Study

Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Gren, M. & Höckert, E. (2019). Hotel Anthropocene. In: Yeoman, I., McMahon-Beattie, U. & Sigala, M. (Ed.), Science Fiction, Disruption and Tourism: . Channel View Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hotel Anthropocene
2019 (English)In: Science Fiction, Disruption and Tourism / [ed] Yeoman, I., McMahon-Beattie, U. & Sigala, M., Channel View Publications, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Hotel Anthropocene is a new hotel advertised as a luxury all-inclusive resort. It was until recently operated under the name of ´Hotel Holocene´, but due to the widespread attention the Anthropocene has received the new owners decided to change its name. The day at the Hotel Anthropocene, written in the form of fiction, renders different ways of knowing, feeling, sensing, conceptualizing, and practising real time ecological mutation. The guests are increasingly dissatisfied and they gradually realise that something is terribly wrong with the hotel. The dialogues and heated discussions take place in the hotel lobby, corridors, rooms, the pool-bar, the restaurant, the common room, and they disclose cognitive and emotional dissonances in relation to the future.

The chapter invites the reader to critically reflect upon tourism futures in relation to contemporary climate change and planetary ethics. It disrupts the idea of touristic bubbles without entanglements and responsibility with the ongoing crisis. The chapter also draws attention to a fundamental paradox of tourism, where search for wellbeing and hedonistic joy simultaneously contribute to accelerating climate change. The story at the hotel problematizes the conceptualization and practices of a ‘common future’, especially the future as a utopian time that lies ahead. Consequently, towards the end, the guests begin to realise that there is, unfortunately, no check-out from this hotel.

The story of Hotel Anthropocene also raises questions about our responsibilities as researchers and teachers when using fiction as method for producing and sharing knowledge of our current and future planetary situation in the Anthropocene. How do different kinds of stories tune us in, or out? What kinds of storytelling and story listening should we engage in if we wish to contribute to a more caring, sustainable, hospitable and peaceful co-existence in our one and only common “hotel” when cast in dire predictions of its planetary future?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Channel View Publications, 2019
Series
The Future of Tourism
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Social Sciences
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79233 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-10-02
Paddison, B., Höckert, E. & Crossley, É. (2019). Special issue: Building our stories: Co-creating tourism futures in tourism research, education and practice. Journal of Teaching in Travel and Tourism, 19(1), 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Special issue: Building our stories: Co-creating tourism futures in tourism research, education and practice
2019 (English)In: Journal of Teaching in Travel and Tourism, ISSN 1531-3220, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Storytelling is a powerful way of exploring the past, crafting values in the present, and imagining the future. Stories, told from different perspectives and drawing from diverse experiences, can build shared understandings, empathy and care. Everyday stories of tourism - coping, success, empowerment, nurturing, disruption, relationship building and activism - are important tools that help students, teachers, researchers, practitioners and community members reflect and learn. The stories that we tell join the streams of wider narratives, shaping our understanding of the world and the ways in which we encounter it, thus providing a worldmaking function. Engaging in storytelling is anything but a benign activity as different narratives are continuously constituting and naturalizing the world and our relations with others. Tourism scholar Keith Hollinshead (2004) describes worldmaking as collaborative processes that essentialize and normalize peoples, places and practices. Hence, the notion of worldmaking calls for critical reflection on the ways in which stories enact, reinforce and alter power relationships by erasing alternative stories and by giving to voices in the margins. For us as tourism educators, storytelling unlock doors, opens new spaces for multiple ways of knowing and being, and moves towards more sustainable, hopeful, caring and ethical worldmaking in tourism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
tourism, storytelling, education, co-creation
National Category
Economics and Business Educational Sciences
Research subject
Tourism; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79235 (URN)10.1080/15313220.2018.1560527 (DOI)000469938800001 ()2-s2.0-85059086601 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Veijola, S., Höckert, E., Carlin, D., Light, A. & Säynäjäkangas, J. (2019). The conference reimagined: postcards, letters, and camping together in undressed places. DIGITHUM (24), 21-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The conference reimagined: postcards, letters, and camping together in undressed places
Show others...
2019 (English)In: DIGITHUM, ISSN 1575-2275, E-ISSN 1575-2275, no 24, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, five authors account for the rethinking of a conference as a series of postcards, letters, rules and silent moments so that traditional hierarchies of knowledge could be overturned or, at least, sidelined. We recount how the place we convened was enlisted as an actor and the dramas and devices we applied to encounter it. We use this accounting to problematize the conventional practices of goal-oriented meetings and co-authored papers as forms of academic meaning-making. In finding a meeting point where expertise was disorientated and status undressed, we were able to investigate the idea of co-being between human and nonhuman realities as the step social theory needs to take to become a point of connection with the social world, instead of an escape from it. We conclude that this involved silence and necessary fictions as a means to consider the future and past in the moment of meeting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Universidad de Antioquia, 2019
Keywords
Camping, Conferencing, Undressed places, Silence, Good life, Slow writing, Entangled nonfiction
National Category
Other Humanities
Research subject
Social Sciences; Humanities; Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79290 (URN)10.7238/d.v0i24.3168 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2019-09-12Bibliographically approved
Höckert, E. (2018). Conference review: ‘Greetings from Palma’, 7th Critical Tourism Studies Conference, Palma de Mallorca, Spain, 25–29 June 2017. Paper presented at 7th Critical Tourism Studies Conference, Palma de Mallorca, Spain, June 25–29, 2017. Hospitality & Society, 8(2), 179-187, Article ID 10.1386/hosp.8.2.179_7.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conference review: ‘Greetings from Palma’, 7th Critical Tourism Studies Conference, Palma de Mallorca, Spain, 25–29 June 2017
2018 (English)In: Hospitality & Society, ISSN 2042-7913, E-ISSN 2042-7921, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 179-187, article id 10.1386/hosp.8.2.179_7Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

There I was sitting on my Airport-hotel-room’s balcony, gathering sunbeams and breathing warm Mallorca air. I had the world’s biggest smile on my face: it felt almost surreal to be on this island for a tourism conference. I had lived here eleven years ago when I studied tourism at The University of the Balearic Islands and worked at a hotel by the Palmanova beach. Well, it merits mention that during that time I did not only fall in love with Palma and the entire island, but also with a fellow exchange-student from Sweden. What else could I have done but smile; I was back in amazing Mallorca, reading the 7th Critical Tourism Studies’ (CTS) conference programme and getting more and more excited about the forthcoming four days of conferencing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Intellect Ltd., 2018
Keywords
Tourism, Critical studies, Ethics, Responsibility, Care, Turism, Etik, Hållbarhet
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75623 (URN)10.1386/hosp.8.2.179_7 (DOI)000435000000004 ()
Conference
7th Critical Tourism Studies Conference, Palma de Mallorca, Spain, June 25–29, 2017
Available from: 2018-06-12 Created: 2018-06-12 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Höckert, E., Lüthje, M., Ilola, H. & Stewart, E. (2018). Gazes and Faces in Tourist Photography. Annals of Tourism Research (73), 131-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gazes and Faces in Tourist Photography
2018 (English)In: Annals of Tourism Research, ISSN 0160-7383, E-ISSN 1873-7722, no 73, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article illuminates one of the central ethical questions concerning tourist photography: the ways in which tourists photograph local people in tourist destinations. In line with the previous research on tourist photography, the study suggests that tourists’ experiences of responsible behaviour become continuously re-defined and negotiated in relations with others. Through a hermeneutic phenomenological analysis of tourists’ accounts, the study focusses on the role of the face in photography; that is, how encountering the face of the other interrupts the photographer and calls for heightened responsibility and reflection. Drawing on the Levinasian idea of ethics as being-for-the-other, the article visualizes relational ethics that do not originate from the tourist’s gaze, but from the face of the other.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
tourist photography, ethics, gaze, face, Levinas, relationality
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism; Social Sciences, Practical Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77542 (URN)10.1016/j.annals.2018.09.007 (DOI)000450384000012 ()2-s2.0-85054424459 (Scopus ID)
Note

Highlights

• Exploring Levinasian idea of relational ethics in the context of tourism photography.

• Approaching tourists’ experiences with hermeneutic phenomenological analysis.

• Discussing how the face of the other calls for responsibility, engagement and reflection.

• Envisioning ethics that originate, not from the tourists’ gaze, but from the face of the other.

Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Höckert, E. (2018). Gästfrihet som öppenhet mot den andra. Ikaros – tidskrift om människan och vetenskapen (1), 32-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gästfrihet som öppenhet mot den andra
2018 (Swedish)In: Ikaros – tidskrift om människan och vetenskapen, ISSN 1796-1998, no 1, p. 32-33Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

Kan man använda begreppet ’gästfrihet’ om näringsidkare inom turismbranschen? Vad menar vi egentligen med ’gästfrihet’? Emily Höckert visar, att frågorna är komplicerade. Utmaningen består i hur vi ska beskriva mötet mellan människor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Åbo, Finland: Ikaros – tidskrift om människan och vetenskapen, 2018
Keywords
Turism, Gästfrihet, Nicaragua, Utveckling
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-76114 (URN)
Available from: 2018-06-18 Created: 2018-06-18 Last updated: 2019-03-11Bibliographically approved
Höckert, E. (2018). Keynote: Thinking with Hospitality. In: : . Paper presented at Critical Tourism Studies North America (CTS-NA) II: Critical connectivities and caring communities across borders, Thompson Rivers University, Canada, August 20-24, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Keynote: Thinking with Hospitality
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Keynote speaker:

Emily Höckert is a Postdoctoral fellow in tourism studies at the Linnaeus University in Sweden in the Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. In the broadest level, her research is driven by curiosity of how hosts and guests welcome each other in responsible tourism encounters. She approaches the questions of hospitality, ethics and care by drawing on hermeneutic phenomenology and postcolonial philosophy. Emily is the author of Negotiating Hospitality (2018) and co-author of Disruptive Tourism and Its Untidy Guests (2014), which both discuss about relational ways of being in tourism settings. 

Keywords
Tourism, Hospitality, Ethics, Ecology
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77539 (URN)
Conference
Critical Tourism Studies North America (CTS-NA) II: Critical connectivities and caring communities across borders, Thompson Rivers University, Canada, August 20-24, 2018
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-11-15Bibliographically approved
Kugapi, O. & Höckert, E. (2018). Knitting and purling care: entangled stories of green-and-white mittens. In: Tourism implications and dilemmas, 24-26 September 2018, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway: book of abstract. Paper presented at 27th Nordic Symposium on Tourism and Hospitality Research, Alta, Norway, September 24-26, 2018 (pp. 9-9). The Arctic University of Norway
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knitting and purling care: entangled stories of green-and-white mittens
2018 (English)In: Tourism implications and dilemmas, 24-26 September 2018, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Alta, Norway: book of abstract, The Arctic University of Norway , 2018, p. 9-9Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

My left-hand-mitten is missing. The green-and-white one that I had received as a birthday present and I had hugged hundreds of times in my hand. It was knitted with care by passionate handicraft tourist, who had bought the STOORSTÅLKA’s yarns from Sapmi. What if it was somewhere covered by wet and heavy snow?

This article is a story of a pair of green-and-white-mittens. The narrative explores the ways in which handicraft tourism and handicrafts connect people and places, enabling various ways of mental travelling. The article joins the ongoing search of relational ethics in tourism research where agency and relationality are not limited to social lives of humans. Building on previous discussions on Actor-Network-Theory in Tourism studies (van der Duim, Ren & Jóhannesson 2017), we explore how non-human actors can mobilize, spread and entangle stories, emotions, affects and care beyond tourist destinations. By using an autoethnographic approach, we knit, purl and unravel stitches, bringing more understanding about phenomenology, materiality and relationality. Hence, instead of observing handicrafts and tourism from distance, we hold on to the knitting needles and become part of the phenomenon we wish to understand. The theoretical pattern is strengthened by pulling threads through loops between non-representational theory, materiality (Thrift 2005; 2008), new-materialism and matters of care (Puig de la Bellacasa 2017) that draw mind and matter, nature and culture into the same arena. These discussions encourage and guide us to go beyond representation and orientate ourselves towards multiple ways of expressing and experiencing care in tourism settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Arctic University of Norway, 2018
Keywords
Handicrafts, Materiality, New-materialism, Matters of care, Phenomenology
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79276 (URN)
Conference
27th Nordic Symposium on Tourism and Hospitality Research, Alta, Norway, September 24-26, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7339-3261

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