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Shea, J., Stutz, A. J. & Nilsson Stutz, L. (2019). An Early Upper Palaeolithic Stone Tool Assemblage from Mughr El-Hamamah, Jordan: An Interim Report. Journal of field archaeology, 44(7), 420-439
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Early Upper Palaeolithic Stone Tool Assemblage from Mughr El-Hamamah, Jordan: An Interim Report
2019 (English)In: Journal of field archaeology, ISSN 0093-4690, E-ISSN 2042-4582, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 420-439Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mughr el-Hamamah (Jordan) Layer B contains an Early Upper Palaeolithic stone tool assemblage dating to around 39–45 kya cal b.p. This assemblage is unusual in that it samples human forager activities around the ecotone between the Transjordanian Plateau and the palaeo-lake (Lake Lisan) that filled much of the Jordan Valley during Late Pleistocene times. This paper describes that assemblage, comparing it to other Levantine Upper Palaeolithic assemblages of equivalent antiquity. The Mughr el-Hamamah Layer B assemblage appears most similar to Early Ahmarian assemblages, but it departs from typical such assemblages in ways that may reflect local conditions’ influence on human activities carried out in and near the cave. Mughr el-Hamamah raises new questions about changes in residential mobility, off-site provisioning and foraging activity, and on-site task diversity in the Early Upper Palaeolithic period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Upper Palaeolithic, Levant, Jordan, stone tools, Ahmarian
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89041 (URN)10.1080/00934690.2019.1655519 (DOI)000485780300001 ()
Funder
Wenner-Gren Foundations
Note

This work was supported by the Oxford College of Emory University; Gregory-Rackley Career Development Award to A. J. Stutz; NSF High Risk Research in Anthropology Grant (#1025352); L. S. B. Leakey Foundation; Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research; and 65 backers of the crowdfunded project, “How Did Palaeolithic Hunter-Gatherers Use and Consume Plant Resources in Eurasia” on Experiment.com (https://doi.org/10.18258/9109).

Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-12-06Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Stutz, L. (2018). A future for archaeology: in defense of an intellectually engaged, collaborative and confident archaeology. Norwegian Archaeological Review, 51(1-2), 48-56
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A future for archaeology: in defense of an intellectually engaged, collaborative and confident archaeology
2018 (English)In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 51, no 1-2, p. 48-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Through a critical review of inter- and transdisciplinarity in archaeology, this paper examines the power relationships within archaeology with regards to collaborators within and beyond the academy. By making a case for an archaeology that openly collaborates across disciplines and knowledge sys- tems, but also more firmly articulates itself and its value, the paper makes a case for an engaged and problematising archaeology for the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
interdisciplinarity, transdisciplinarity, Third Science Revolution, public intellectual debate, multivocality
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78815 (URN)10.1080/00293652.2018.1544168 (DOI)000454447800006 ()2-s2.0-85057341545 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-15 Created: 2018-11-15 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Stutz, A. J. & Nilsson Stutz, L. (2018). Burial and ritual. In: Wenda Trevathan (Ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Biological Anthropology: . New York: John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burial and ritual
2018 (English)In: The International Encyclopedia of Biological Anthropology / [ed] Wenda Trevathan, New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Inhumation—more commonly referred to as burial—is one of the most common mortuary ritual treatments, viewed across the diversity of human cultures and throughout recent prehistoric and historical periods. Mortuary treatments are the techniques by which members of human societies ritually handle the bodily remains of the dead, as the living stage a meaningful transition to cope with the social and emotional impacts of death and loss (Nilsson Stutz 2003). Primary burial—that is, inhumation of the whole cadaver—can leave particularly recognizable taphonomic signatures, and thus, it may be reliably distinguished from unintentional disturbance and mixing (Duday 2009; Nilsson Stutz 2003). As such, Pleistocene‐age burial features provide evidence of the evolution of human ritualized behaviors. A comparative evolutionary perspective on human ritual can also clarify unique derived features of sociality, complex cognition, symbolism, language, and extended life history strategies in the hominins.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
burial, ritual, paleolithic, mesolithic
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78912 (URN)10.1002/9781118584538.ieba0081 (DOI)978-1-118-58442-2 (ISBN)9781118584538 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2019-01-22Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Stutz, L. (2018). Commentary on Grauer and Miller, and DeWitte and Kowaleski [Letter to the editor]. Fragments: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Ancient and Medieval Pasts, 7, 73-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commentary on Grauer and Miller, and DeWitte and Kowaleski
2018 (English)In: Fragments: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Ancient and Medieval Pasts, ISSN 2161-8585, Vol. 7, p. 73-79Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The papers by DeWitte and Kowaleski, and Grauer and Miller are exemplary interdisciplinary studies, bringing together the written word of historical records with the material remains of the dead to tell a more complete and complex story about violence and disease in Medieval England. Both demonstrate how integrated, critical analysis of varying sources through the lens of different disciplines adds both nuance and depth to our understanding of the past. This commentary will engage these two papers in a discussion about key components of their interdisciplinary scholarship, but also push further by pointing out dimensions and possibilities that they leave unexplored. The purpose of doing this is not to critique the papers’ findings, but rather to open up a discussion of new directions for interdisciplinary scholarship, especially in the era of the “Third Science Revolution”[1] and its effects on archaeology, bioarchaeology, and our understanding of the past. This commentary will challenge the idea of what we expect interdisciplinary work in archaeology to “look like”; it will break away from the limiting dyadic relationship that has come to dominate the field in favor of a more dynamic and expanding approach that engages with a broader range of disciplines on equal terms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 2018
Keywords
interdisciplinary, biological anthropology, history, archaeology, Middle Ages
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology; Humanities, History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81359 (URN)
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Stutz, L. (2018). From Here and to Death: The Archaeology of the Human Body. In: Antonius C. G. M. Robben (Ed.), A Companion to the Anthropology of Death: (pp. 323-335). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Here and to Death: The Archaeology of the Human Body
2018 (English)In: A Companion to the Anthropology of Death / [ed] Antonius C. G. M. Robben, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018, p. 323-335Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter explores the positioning of the dead body in archaeology as a bridge between different lines of inquiry. In archaeology, the dead body is both object and subject, providing a unique link to personhood and lived experience through its very materiality. It is also both biological and cultural, and, while it is conspicuously defined by death, it is more commonly explored to access life. By uncovering these connections, this chapter reveals the complexity of the archaeological study of dead bodies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Series
Blackwell Companions to Anthropology ; 32
Keywords
archaeology, death, the body, materiality
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77989 (URN)10.1002/9781119222422.ch23 (DOI)9781119222293 (ISBN)9781119222361 (ISBN)9781119222316 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Stutz, L. (2018). Human Lives and Deaths. In: Sandra L. Lopez Varela (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Archaeological Sciences: . Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human Lives and Deaths
2018 (English)In: The Encyclopedia of Archaeological Sciences / [ed] Sandra L. Lopez Varela, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Archaeology is inherently transdisciplinary as a discipline. In addition to data, it requires the methodological and interpretative work of science, humanities, and social science to puzzle together the fragmented pieces of the past into a coherent story about human lives and deaths. This entry argues that while archaeology is currently benefitting from an intensification of cross‐disciplinary collaborations, we need to maintain this direction in the discipline by developing stronger literacy across the subdisciplinary boundaries and foster a disciplinary culture that explicitly credits the different sides equally.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
transdisciplinarity, disciplinary literacy, burial archaeology, science-humanities divide
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80791 (URN)10.1002/9781119188230.saseas0309 (DOI)9781119188230 (ISBN)9780470674611 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-24 Created: 2019-02-24 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Larsson, L., Nilsson Stutz, L., Zagorska, I., Berzins, V. & Cerinja, A. (2017). New Aspects of the Mesolithic-Neolithic cemeteries and settlement at Zvejnieki, Northen Latvia. Acta Archaeologica, 88(1), 57-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Aspects of the Mesolithic-Neolithic cemeteries and settlement at Zvejnieki, Northen Latvia
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Acta Archaeologica, ISSN 0065-101X, E-ISSN 1600-0390, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 57-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper reflects upon recent international research at Zvejnieki in northern Latvia, a renowned complex of a burial ground and two settlement sites used in the Mesolithic and Neolithic. Since its discovery and first excavations in the 1960s, Zvejnieki continues to produce evidence that provides new grounds for understanding mortuary practises and ancient lifeways. This information is relevant for other contemporary sites in Europe revealing new and hitherto unexpected elements of burial traditions.

It is suggested that the Zvejnieki population was partly mobile, and the site was one of the places to bury the dead. The ancestral link was established through transportation and use of occupational debris from more ancient sites and through the incorporation of earlier burial space or even burials into the new graves. The depth of a burial also appears to be a significant variable in ancient mortuary practices.

Keywords
meolithic, burial archaeology
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77653 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0390.2017.12177.x (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2018-10-25Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Stutz, L. (2016). Building Bridges Between Burial Archaeology and the Archaeology of Death: Where is the Archaeological Study of the Dead Going?. Current Swedish Archaeology, 24, 13-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building Bridges Between Burial Archaeology and the Archaeology of Death: Where is the Archaeological Study of the Dead Going?
2016 (English)In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 13-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: The Swedish Archaeological Society, 2016
Keywords
Archaeology of Death, Mortuary archaeology, debate
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77658 (URN)2-s2.0-85021842681 (Scopus ID)
Note

Invited key note article with comments and reply.

Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Stutz, L. (2016). Cautionary Optimistic: A reply. Current Swedish Archaeology, 24, 71-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cautionary Optimistic: A reply
2016 (English)In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: The Swedish Archaeological Society, 2016
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77659 (URN)
Note

Repsonse to comments on keynote.

Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Stutz, L. & Larsson, L. (2016). Disturbing the Dead: Archaeothanatological Analysis of the stone age burials at Zveijnieki, Latvia (excavated 2006-2009). Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 10, 715-724
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disturbing the Dead: Archaeothanatological Analysis of the stone age burials at Zveijnieki, Latvia (excavated 2006-2009)
2016 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 10, p. 715-724Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Zvejnieki burial ground in northern Latvia is one of the largest concentrations of burials from the Mesolithic and Neolithic in Northern Europe. The 308 burials, dominated by primary inhumation, excavated in the 1960s and 1970s have become important references for understanding the hunter-gatherer mortuary practices in the region. Recent excavations, implementing a taphonomy-focused archaeothanatological protocol revealed 26 additional burials. The analysis confirmed important aspects of the patterns already observed at the site, such as primary inhumation, multiple depositions, and the occasional practice of wrapping the body before disposal. The analysis also revealed previously ignored patterns of systematic disturbance. By focusing on the disarticulated remains and on establishing the sequence of disturbances, the study concluded that the disturbance of older burials must be understood not as accidental but as an integral and meaningful part of the mortuary practices that can be tied to a concern with permanence of places in the landscape at the transition to increasing sedentism among the Neolithic populations in the Eastern Baltic.

Keywords
Archaeothanatology, Mesolithic, Mortuary ritual
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77660 (URN)10.1016/j.jasrep.2016.06.034 (DOI)2-s2.0-84992467545 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0575-7075

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