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Yildirim, Yeserin
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Nordahl, O., Koch-Schmidt, P., Sunde, J., Yildirim, Y., Tibblin, P., Forsman, A. & Larsson, P. (2019). Genetic differentiation between and within ecotypes of pike (Esox lucius) in the Baltic Sea. Aquatic conservation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic differentiation between and within ecotypes of pike (Esox lucius) in the Baltic Sea
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2019 (English)In: Aquatic conservation, ISSN 1052-7613, E-ISSN 1099-0755Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aquatic systems often lack physical boundaries for gene flow, but ecological and behavioural barriers can form surprisingly fine spatial scale genetic patterns that challenge traditional, large scale management. To detect fine spatial scale structures, understand sources of intraspecific diversity, and design appropriate management plans requires identification of reproductively isolated units. This study reports on genetic differentiation in pike (Esox lucius) within a coastal area stretching 55 km from south to north in the central Baltic Sea. Pike is here an economically and ecologically important top predator that has declined in abundance. However, population structures have mostly been studied on large spatial scales, and without considering the potential for genetic divergence between the sympatric anadromous fresh water and the resident brackish water spawning ecotypes. To this end, 487 individuals from the east coast of Sweden and the island of oland, representing sympatric anadromous and resident spawning individuals, categorized to ecotype based on spawning location or otolith microchemistry, were genotyped for 10 microsatellites and used to test for divergence between ecotypes. Furthermore, divergence between regions (island/mainland), neighbouring spawning locations (n = 13) and isolation by distance within and between regions were evaluated for the anadromous ecotype. The results revealed strong genetic differences between regions, between spawning locations separated by as little as 5 km and the first evidence of genetic differentiation between resident and anadromous ecotypes; despite a high dispersal capacity of pike and a high connectivity within the study area. The signatures of isolation by distance indicated that connectivity among populations differed between regions, probably reflecting availability of spawning habitats. To safeguard against the challenges and uncertainties associated with environmental change, adaptive conservation management should aim to promote high intra-population functional genetic diversity without compromising the continued integrity and coexistence of the different ecotypes and of locally adapted sub-populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
biodiversity, brackish, climate, coastal, fish, fishing, genetics, migration, wetland
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88825 (URN)10.1002/aqc.3196 (DOI)000481341300001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29
Yildirim, Y., Tinnert, J. & Forsman, A. (2018). Contrasting patterns of neutral and functional genetic diversity in stable and disturbed environments. Ecology and Evolution, 8(23), 12073-12089
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contrasting patterns of neutral and functional genetic diversity in stable and disturbed environments
2018 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 8, no 23, p. 12073-12089Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genetic structure among and diversity within natural populations is influenced by acombination of ecological and evolutionary processes. These processes can differentlyinfluence neutral and functional genetic diversity and also vary according toenvironmental settings. To investigate the roles of interacting processes as drivers ofpopulation‐level genetic diversity in the wild, we compared neutral and functionalstructure and diversity between 20 Tetrix undulata pygmy grasshopper populations indisturbed and stable habitats. Genetic differentiation was evident among the differentpopulations, but there was no genetic separation between stable and disturbedenvironments. The incidence of long‐winged phenotypes was higher in disturbedhabitats, indicating that these populations were recently established by flight‐capablecolonizers. Color morph diversity and dispersion of outlier genetic diversity, estimatedusing AFLP markers, were higher in disturbed than in stable environments,likely reflecting that color polymorphism and variation in other functionally importanttraits increase establishment success. Neutral genetic diversity estimated usingAFLP markers was lower in disturbed habitats, indicating stronger eroding effects onneutral diversity of genetic drift associated with founding events in disturbed comparedto stable habitats. Functional diversity and neutral diversity were negativelycorrelated across populations, highlighting the utility of outlier loci in genetics studiesand reinforcing that estimates of genetic diversity based on neutral markers donot infer evolutionary potential and the ability of populations and species to copewith environmental change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
color polymorphism, dispersal, evolution, grasshoppers, population genetics
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Evolutionary Biology Genetics
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78896 (URN)10.1002/ece3.4667 (DOI)000454107200060 ()30598801 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056299130 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2017-2007-364Swedish Research Council, 621-2010-5327
Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Yildirim, Y., Anderson, M. J., Hansson, B., Patel, S., Millar, C. D. & Rainey, P. B. (2018). Genetic structure of the grey side-gilled sea slug (Pleurobranchaea maculata) in coastal waters of New Zealand. PLoS ONE, 13(8), Article ID e0202197.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic structure of the grey side-gilled sea slug (Pleurobranchaea maculata) in coastal waters of New Zealand
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0202197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pleurobranchaea maculata is a rarely studied species of the Heterobranchia found throughout the south and western Pacific-and recently recorded in Argentina-whose population genetic structure is unknown. Interest in the species was sparked in New Zealand following a series of dog deaths caused by ingestions of slugs containing high levels of the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin. Here we describe the genetic structure and demographic history of P. maculata populations from five principle locations in New Zealand based on extensive analyses of 12 microsatellite loci and the COI and CytB regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Microsatellite data showed significant differentiation between northern and southern populations with population structure being associated with previously described regional variations in tetrodotoxin concentrations. However, mtDNA sequence data did not support such structure, revealing a star-shaped haplotype network with estimates of expansion time suggesting a population expansion in the Pleistocene era. Inclusion of publicly available mtDNA sequence sea slugs from Argentina did not alter the star-shaped network. We interpret our data as indicative of a single founding population that fragmented following geographical changes that brought about the present day north-south divide in New Zealand waters. Lack of evidence of cryptic species supports data indicating that differences in toxicity of individuals among regions are a consequence of differences in diet.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco: Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2018
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-77729 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0202197 (DOI)000441850400049 ()30114275 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053523053 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-13 Created: 2018-09-13 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
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