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Pagaduan, J., Uzicanin, E., Muratovic, M. & Pojskić, H. (2019). Accuracy and reliability of a free mobile HRV application in measurement of heart rate variability. Paper presented at Supplementary Issue: Spring Conferences of Sports Science. 15th Convention and Workshop of the International Network of Sport and Health Science, 5-8 June 2019.. Journal of Human Sport and Exercise, 14(4proc), S578-583
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accuracy and reliability of a free mobile HRV application in measurement of heart rate variability
2019 (English)In: Journal of Human Sport and Exercise, ISSN 1988-5202, E-ISSN 1988-5202, Vol. 14, no 4proc, p. S578-583Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Background: This study aimed to investigate the accuracy and reliability of a free mobile heart rate variability (HRV) application in measuring HRV. Methods: Twelve females and 12 males underwent five-minute simultaneous HRV recording from electrocardiogram (ECG) and chest strap connected to a free mobile HRV application (HRVapp) in a supine position. HRV data from ECG and HRVapp were used to examine accuracy and reliability via relative error and intraclass correlation coefficient respectively. Results: The natural log of the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent normal to normal intervals (lnRMSSD) exhibited accuracy and high reliability in HRVapp. Conclusion: lnRMSSD in HRVapp can serve as an alternative, low-cost technology for measurement of autonomic activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Alicante, Spain, 2019
Keywords
Heart rate variability; Mobile application; Autonomic health; Parasympathetic nervous system; Sympathetic nervous system; Autonomic activity
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89369 (URN)10.14198/jhse.2019.14.Proc4.15 (DOI)
Conference
Supplementary Issue: Spring Conferences of Sports Science. 15th Convention and Workshop of the International Network of Sport and Health Science, 5-8 June 2019.
Available from: 2019-10-01 Created: 2019-10-01 Last updated: 2019-11-29
Pojskić, H., Pagaduan, J., Uzicanin, E., Separovic, V., Spasic, M., Foretic, N. & Sekulic, D. (2019). Reliability, Validity and Usefulness of a New Response Time Test for Agility-Based Sports: A Simple vs. Complex Motor Task: Sport-specific reach and touch tests. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (JSSM), 18(4), 623-635
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reliability, Validity and Usefulness of a New Response Time Test for Agility-Based Sports: A Simple vs. Complex Motor Task: Sport-specific reach and touch tests
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (JSSM), ISSN 1303-2968, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 623-635Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The importance of response time (RT) in sports is well known, but there is an evident lack of reliable and valid sport-specific measurement tools applicable in the evaluation of RT in trained athletes. This study aimed to identify the validity, reliability, and usefulness of four newly developed RT testing protocols among athletes from agility-saturated (AG) and non-agility-saturated (NAG) sports. Thirty-seven AG and ten NAG athletes (age: 20.9± 2.9; eleven females) volunteered to undergo: three randomized simple response time (SRT-1, SRT-2, and SRT-3) protocols that included a single limb movement, and one complex response time (CRT) protocol that included multi joint movements and whole body transition over a short distance (1.5 and 1.8m). Each RT test involved 3 trials with 5 randomized attempts per trial. Two sensors were placed at the left- and right-hand side for SRT-1 and SRT-2. Three sensors were positioned (left, middle, right) in SRT-3 and CRT. The intra-class-correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated as a measure of reliability. Independent sample t test, effect size (d), and area-under-the-curve (AUC) were calculated to define discriminative validity of the tests. The results showed the newly developed tests were more reliable and useful in the AG than NAG athletes (i.e., ICC between 0.68 and 0.97versus 0.31 - 0.90, respectively). The RT of AG athletes was faster than that of NAG athletes in the CRT test from the left (p<0.01, d = 2.40, AUC: 0.98), centre (p < 0.01, d = 1.57, AUC:0.89), and right sensor (p < 0.01, d = 1.93, AUC: 0.89) locations. In contrast, there were no differences between the groups in the SRT tests. The weak correlation (i.e., r= 0.00 - 0.33) between the SRT and CRT tests suggests that response time of the single limb and multijoint limb movements should not be considered as a single motor capacity. In conclusion, this study showed that AG athletes had faster response time than their NAG peers during complex motor tasks. Such enhanced ability to rapidly and accurately reprogram complex motor tasks can be considered one of the essential qualities required for advanced performance in agility based sports.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uludag University, Turkey, 2019
Keywords
reaction time, reactive agility, neuromotor memory, perception, reach and touch
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88100 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved
Pagaduan, J., Schoenfeld, B. & Pojskić, H. (2019). Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Effect of Contrast Training on Vertical Jump Performance. Strength and conditioning journal, 41(3), 63-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Effect of Contrast Training on Vertical Jump Performance
2019 (English)In: Strength and conditioning journal, ISSN 1524-1602, E-ISSN 1533-4295, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 63-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the effect of contrast training(CT) on vertical jump performance. Thirteen out of 83 studies were included for systematic review while ten studies were utilized for meta-analysis. Meta-analysis revealed greater CMJ gains in CT than resistance training(ES = 1.30; CI = 0.31, 2.30). Similarly, CT displayed higher countermovement jump (CMJ) than control (ES = 1.46; CI = 0.46, 2.46). In conclusion, CT showed greater improvement in CMJ compared to RT and CON. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2019
Keywords
contrast training, complex training, vertical jump, combined training, plyometric training, resistance training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80003 (URN)10.1519/SSC.0000000000000442 (DOI)000480695500006 ()2-s2.0-85070304934 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-29 Created: 2019-01-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Pojskić, H., Pagaduan, J., Uzicanin, E. & Sekulic, D. (2019). The development of new sport-specific response time tests: validity, reliability, and functionality. In: Bjelica, D., Popovic, S., Akpinar, S. (Ed.), 16th Annual Scientifi Conference of Montenegrin Sports Academy “Sport, Physical Activity and Health: Contemporary Perspectives”: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at 16th Annual Scientific Conference of Montenegrin Sports Academy, "Sport, Physical Activity and Health: Contemporary Perspectives", 4-7 April 2019, Cavtat, Dubrovnik, Croatia (pp. 27). Podgorica, Montenegro: University of Montenegro, 16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The development of new sport-specific response time tests: validity, reliability, and functionality
2019 (English)In: 16th Annual Scientifi Conference of Montenegrin Sports Academy “Sport, Physical Activity and Health: Contemporary Perspectives”: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Bjelica, D., Popovic, S., Akpinar, S., Podgorica, Montenegro: University of Montenegro , 2019, Vol. 16, p. 27-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Response time (RT) has been defi ned as the time needed for a person to perceive and respondto some external stimulus (Schmidt et al., 2018). Defi ned in such a way, we can say that RT iscritical characteristic in athlete performance, especially in rapid-action sports where athletes need to reactquickly and accurately in various sporting situations in response to game-specifi c clues (e.g., movementof the ball, opponent player, etc.) (Pojskic et al., 2018; Sekulic et al., 2014). However, there is an evidentlack of reliable and valid sport-specifi c measurement tools applicable in the evaluation of RT in trainedathletes. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the validity, reliability, and functionality of four newlydeveloped RT testing protocols among athletes from agility-saturated (AG) and non-agility-saturated(NAG) sports. Methods: Thirty-seven AG and ten NAG athletes (age: 20.1 ± 2.8; eleven females) volunteeredto undergo three randomized simple response time (SRT) protocols that included a single limbmovement and one complex response time (CRT) protocol that included multi joint movements andwhole body transition over a short distance (1.5 and 1.8m). Each RT test involved 3 trials with 5 randomizedattempts per trial. Two sensors were placed at the left- and right-hand side for SRT-1 and SRT-2.Three sensors were positioned (left, middle, right) in SRT-3 and CRT. Results: The results showed thenewly developed tests were more reliable and functional in the AG athletes. The RT of AG athletes wasfaster than that of NAG athletes in the CRT test from the left (p = 0.00, d = 2.40), center (p = 0.00, d =1.57), and right sensor (p = 0.00, d = 1.93) locations. In contrast, there were no differences between thegroups in the SRT tests, which indicated that they can be used independently of the sport affi liation. Discussion:The weak correlation between the SRT and CRT tests suggests that response time of the singlelimb and multipoint limb movements should not be considered as a single motor capacity. This studydetermined that AG athletes were more capable of dealing with complex response tasks than their NAGpeers. Such enhanced ability to rapidly and accurately reprogram complex motor tasks can be consideredone of the essential qualities required for advanced performance in agility-based sports. Therefore,coaches who work with fi eld-sports athletes should be aware that development of rapid response time incomplex motor tasks is mostly dependent on the training of neuromotor coordination (i.e., specifi c motorprofi ciency). This means that, in designing training programs, special attention should be focused onproper learning of various sport-related motor programs (i.e., playing technique) that once learned canbe rapidly retrieved from neuromotor memory and formatted as an effi cient motor response. References:Pojskic et al. (2018). Front Physiol 9. Schmidt et al. (2018). Motor Control and Learning, Human Kinetics.Sekulic et al. (2014). J Strength Cond Res 28.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Podgorica, Montenegro: University of Montenegro, 2019
Series
Annual Scientific Conference of Montenegrin Sports Academy: “Sport, Physical Activity and Health: Contemporary Perspectives”, ISSN 2536-5398, E-ISSN 2536-5401
Keywords
reaction time, neuromotor coordination, agility, team sports, basketball
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81340 (URN)
Conference
16th Annual Scientific Conference of Montenegrin Sports Academy, "Sport, Physical Activity and Health: Contemporary Perspectives", 4-7 April 2019, Cavtat, Dubrovnik, Croatia
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved
Zubak, Z., Zenic, N., Ostojic, L., Zubak, I. & Pojskić, H. (2018). A Prospective study on the influence of scholastic factors on the prevalence and initiation of illicit drug misuse in adolescence. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(5), 1-12, Article ID 874.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Prospective study on the influence of scholastic factors on the prevalence and initiation of illicit drug misuse in adolescence
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 1-12, article id 874Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This study aimed to prospectively investigate the scholastic factors related to illicit drug misuse (IDM) and the initiation of IDM among older adolescents from Bosnia andHerzegovina. Methods: This 2-year prospective study included 436 participants (202 females), who were an average of 16 years old at the beginning of the study (baseline). The participants were tested at baseline and follow-up (20 months later). The predictors included variables of scholastic-achievement (grade point average, school absences, unexcused absences and behavioral grade). The criteria were: (i) IDM at baseline; (ii) IDM at follow-up; and (iii) initiation of IDM over the study course. Results: Logistic regression indicated increased odds of IDM in adolescents who were more frequent absent from school (baseline: Odds Ratio (OR): 3.73, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.12–6.57; follow-up: OR: 2.91, 95% CI: 1.90–4.65). The lower grade point average and more unexcused absences were evidenced for adolescents who consumed drugs on follow-up(OR: 1.67, 95% CI: 1.11–2.51; OR: 1.74, 95% CI: 1.30–2.32 for grade point average and unexcused absences, respectively). Initiation of IDM was predicted by frequent absences from school (OR: 2.2,95% CI: 1.3–3.8), and lower behavioral grades (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2–3.3). Conclusions: The findings confirmed strong correlations between scholastic failure and IDM. Absences from school and lower behavioral grades at baseline were predictive of the initiation of IDM in older adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
Substance misuse, Academic achievement, Puberty, Association
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78052 (URN)10.3390/ijerph15050874 (DOI)000435197300042 ()29702611 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046132057 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2018-10-26Bibliographically approved
Zubak, Z., Terzic, A., Zenic, N., Ostojic, L., Zubak, I., Jelicic, M. & Pojskić, H. (2018). Are sports-related factors correlated to the prevalence and initiation of illicit drug misuse in adolescence?: prospective study in older adolescents. BioMed Research International, 2018, 1-10, Article ID 1236284.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are sports-related factors correlated to the prevalence and initiation of illicit drug misuse in adolescence?: prospective study in older adolescents
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2018 (English)In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2018, p. 1-10, article id 1236284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sport participation is considered as a factor of potential influence on illicit drug misuse (IDM) in adolescence, but there is an evident lack of studies which prospectively investigated this problem. This study aimed to prospectively investigate the sports-related factors related to IDM and the initiation of IDM among older adolescents. The participants were 436 adolescents (202 females; 16 years old at study baseline). They were tested at baseline and follow-up (two years later). The predictors included variables associated with different facets of sports participation and success in sports. The criteria were (i) baseline IDM, (ii) follow-up IDM, and (iii) initiation of IDM between baseline and follow-up. Crude and adjusted (controlled for parental conflict, age, socioeconomic status, and gender) logistic regressions were applied to establish correlations between predictors and criteria. There were higher odds for baseline IDM in adolescents who quit individual sports (OR: 4.2, 95% CI: 1.3-13.9), who had better competitive sports achievements (OR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.0-3.3), and those involved in sports for a longer time (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0-2.5). The IDM at follow-up was more prevalent in adolescents who were involved in sports for a longer time (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1-2.6). Initiation of drug use was predicted by longer experience in sports (OR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.1). Sports-related factors were more negatively than positively related to illicit drug use. Most probably, the transition from junior to senior level in sports put specific stress on those adolescents who were highly committed to sports until that time, but who then had to question their own sports abilities and future potential in sports. Sport-authorities should be informed on established results and specific public-health efforts aimed at preventing IDM in athletic adolescents are urgently needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2018
Keywords
Logistic regressions, Sports participation, Public-health
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science; Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78994 (URN)10.1155/2018/1236284 (DOI)000452960200001 ()30622954 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058633068 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved
Pojskić, H., Sisic, N., Separovic, V. & Sekulic, D. (2018). Association between conditioning capacities and shooting performance in professional basketball players: an analysis of stationary and dynamic shooting skills. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 32(7), 1981-1992
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between conditioning capacities and shooting performance in professional basketball players: an analysis of stationary and dynamic shooting skills
2018 (English)In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 1981-1992Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is known about the influence of conditioning capacities on shooting performance in basketball. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between different conditioning capacities and shooting performance in professional basketball players. In this investigation, we examined 38 males (all perimeter players; height: 185.5+/-6.73 cm; mass: 78.66+/-10.35 kg). Conditioning capacities were evaluated by tests of muscular-strength, aerobic-endurance, jumping- and throwing-capacities, sprinting-speed, pre-planned-agility, anaerobic-endurance and fatigue-resistance. Shooting performance was evaluated using game statistics, as well as six tests of shooting-performance performed in controlled settings: (i) three tests of static (i.e., non-fatigued) shooting-performance (standardized execution of one- (S1), two- (S2) and three-point shots (S3) in stationary conditions), and (ii) three tests of dynamic (i.e., fatigued) shooting-performance (standardized execution of one- (D1), two- (D2), and three-point shots (D3) in dynamic conditions). All three dynamic shooting tests and the S1 test were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with corresponding game statistics. Multiple regression indicated that conditioning capacities were significantly related to D1 (R2=0.36; p=0.03), D2 (R2=0.44; p=0.03), S3 (R2=0.41; p=0.02) and D3 (R2=0.39; p=0.03) tests. Players with a higher fatigue-resistance achieved better results on D1 test ([beta]=-0.37, p=0.03). Pre-planned-agility ([beta]=-0.33, p=0.04), countermovement jump ([beta]=0.42, p=0.03) and fatigue-resistance ([beta]=-0.37, p=0.02) were significant predictors of D2 performance. The countermovement jump ([beta]=0.39, p=0.04), medicine ball toss ([beta]=0.34, p=0.04) and anaerobic-endurance ([beta]=0.46, p=0.04) predicted the results of D3 performance. Jumping, throwing and anaerobic endurance capacities were good determinants of the skill of dynamic shooting over a long distance. These findings emphasize the importance of explosive power and anaerobic-capacity as determinants of shooting-performance in high-level basketball players.

Keywords
accuracy, fatigue, speed, agility, anaerobic capacity
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78047 (URN)10.1519/JSC.0000000000002100 (DOI)000440886300025 ()29939949 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved
Jukic, I., Pojskić, H., Åslin, E., Krolo, A. & Sekulic, D. (2018). Correlates of soccer-specific change of direction speed and reactive agility. In: Presented at 6th NSCA International Conference: . Paper presented at 6th NSCA International Conference, 26-29 September, 2018, Campus Alcobendas, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Spain.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlates of soccer-specific change of direction speed and reactive agility
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2018 (English)In: Presented at 6th NSCA International Conference, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Definition of Agility is based on a model that separates agility in two components, change of direction speed and perceptual and decision making processes. Based on that, two independent types of agility-performances have been identified, including change of direction speed (CODS) and reactive agility (RAG). In addition, agility is known to be a significant determinant of success in soccer due to a high perceptual and decision making skills as well as change of direction demands in soccer. CODS and RAG are generally considered as independent qualities which further suggests that they should be tested and developed separately. However, it remains unclear whether soccer-specific CODS and RAG should be regarded as disparate qualities. METHODS: Twenty young male soccer players (17.0 ± 0.9 years; 1.81 ± 0.03 cm; 70.05 ± 7.41 kg), who participated at the highest level of competition in Sweden at their age, twice reported to the lab to perform soccer specific CODS and RAG tests. First session was familiarization session while the second which consisted of actual CODS and RAG testing took place 72h later. Both CODS and RAG tests consisted of stop-and-go movement patterns which are very common in a soccer game. In addition, both tests included change of direction with the simple ball kicking template. This ball kicking template was invented to mimic defensive soccer skills of stopping the opponent’s first touch with the ball and pass interception. Participants had advanced knowledge of the movement pattern during CODS while they had to react on a visual stimulus that was followed up by change of direction during RAG. RAG testing was done throughout three different protocols (RAG1, RAG2, and RAG3) with CODS being performed once. Both tests consisted of five trials with the 10-15 seconds of rest periods between attempts and 3 minutes of rest between the protocols in RAG. Participants performed all protocols in a random order and after reliability analysis, the best performance was retained as the final result of each participant. Measurements were performed by a hardware device system based on an ATMEL micro-controller (ATMEL Corp, San Jose, CA, USA) as the core of the system. A photoelectric infrared sensor (E18-D80NK) was used as an external time triggering input, and LEDs were used as controlled outputs. Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficients (r) were calculated to reveal the relationships between the tests. RESULTS: The CODS was significantly, but moderately correlated with the RAG1 (r =.50, p <.05), RAG2 (r=.56, p<.05), and RAG3 (r=.63, p<0.01) RAG tests. DISCUSSION: Although significant relationships have been observed, the results showed that the CODS test and RAG tests share only 25, 31 and 39% of the common variance which suggests them being independent qualities. Practitioners in soccer should be looking at these qualities in a unique way with the aim to test and develop them separately.

Keywords
pre-planned agility, non-planned agility, conditioning capacities, team sports
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89393 (URN)
Conference
6th NSCA International Conference, 26-29 September, 2018, Campus Alcobendas, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Spain
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-10-03Bibliographically approved
Pojskić, H., Erik, Å., Krolo, A., Jukic, I., Uljevic, O., Spasic, M. & Sekulic, D. (2018). Importance of reactive agility and change of direction speed in differentiating performance levels in junior soccer players: reliability and validity of newly developed soccer-specific tests. Frontiers in Physiology, 9(May), 1-11, Article ID 506.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Importance of reactive agility and change of direction speed in differentiating performance levels in junior soccer players: reliability and validity of newly developed soccer-specific tests
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, no May, p. 1-11, article id 506Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Agility is a significant determinant of success in soccer; however, studies have rarely presented and evaluated soccer-specific tests of reactive agility (S_RAG) and non-reactive agility (change of direction speed – S_CODS) or their applicability in this sport. The aim of this study was to define the reliability and validity of newly developed tests of the S_RAG and S_CODS to discriminate between the performance levels of junior soccer players. The study consisted of 20 players who were involved at the highest national competitive rank (all males; age: 17.0 0.9 years), divided into three playing positions (defenders, midfielders, and forwards) and two performance levels(U17 and U19). Variables included body mass (BM), body height, body fat percentage,20-m sprint, squat jump, countermovement jump, reactive-strength-index, unilateral jump, 1RM-back-squat, S_CODS, and three protocols of S_RAG. The reliabilities of theS_RAG and S_CODS were appropriate to high (ICC: 0.70 to 0.92), with the strongest reliability evidenced for the S_CODS. The S_CODS and S_RAG shared 25–40% of the common variance. Playing positions significantly differed in BM (large effect-size differences [ES]; midfielders were lightest) and 1RM-back-squat (large ES; lowest results in midfielders). The performance levels significantly differed in age and experience in soccer; U19 achieved better results in the S_CODS (t-test: 3.61, p < 0.05, large ES)and two S_RAG protocols (t-test: 2.14 and 2.41, p < 0.05, moderate ES). Newly developed tests of soccer-specific agility are applicable to differentiate U17 and U19players. Coaches who work with young soccer athletes should be informed that the development of soccer-specific CODS and RAG in this age is mostly dependent on training of the specific motor proficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
Football, Pre-planned agility, Non-planned agility, Conditioning capacities, Team sports
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78037 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2018.00506 (DOI)000432407300001 ()29867552 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047011594 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2018-10-26Bibliographically approved
Pojskić, H. & Eslami, B. (2018). Relationship between obesity, physical activity, and cardiorespiratory fitness levels in children and adolescents in Bosnia and Herzegovina: an analysis of gender differences. Frontiers in Physiology, 9, 1-11, Article ID 1734.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationship between obesity, physical activity, and cardiorespiratory fitness levels in children and adolescents in Bosnia and Herzegovina: an analysis of gender differences
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, p. 1-11, article id 1734Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to examine: (i) the level of physical activity (PA), obesity indices and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) among boys and girls in primary school, and (ii) to determine the association of obesity indices and PA with CRF for the total number of participants, and then separately for boys and girls. 753 sixth to ninth grade girls and boys aged 10–14 years took part in this cross-sectional study. The PA was assessed by the “Physical Activity Questionnaire – Children” and CRF was assessed by the Maximalmultistage a 20 m shuttle run test. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumferences (WC), and waist to height ratio (WHtR) were considered as obesity indices. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to explore correlates of CRF. The results obtained showed the prevalence of general overweight and obesity was 25.5% in our sample which was lower than that in the regional estimate (e.g., 28%) for Eastern Europe. Among all participants, CRF was associated with male sex, older age, a lower WC percentile, higher WHtR, and higher level of PA. The model accounted for 24% of the variance. CRF was associated with older age and a higher level of PA among girls and boys. Lower WC percentile was a significant determinant of CRF among boys. In conclusion, general overweight/obesity was not independently associated with CRF. Those with better CRF were more likely to be male and older, had a higher level ofPA and lower central adiposity. These findings emphasize the importance of supporting school-age children to take a part in programmed physical activity regardless of their body composition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
BMI, overweight, shuttle run test, VO2max, waist circumference
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78993 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2018.01734 (DOI)000451675900001 ()
Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9554-1234

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