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Classon Frangos, Mike
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Classon Frangos, M. (2019). Efter unionsupplösningen: Nation och genuspolitik i Hjalmar Söderbergs Den allvarsamma leken. Edda. Nordisk tidsskrift for litteraturforskning, 106(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efter unionsupplösningen: Nation och genuspolitik i Hjalmar Söderbergs Den allvarsamma leken
2019 (Swedish)In: Edda. Nordisk tidsskrift for litteraturforskning, ISSN 0013-0818, E-ISSN 1500-1989, Vol. 106, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article considers issues of nationalism and gender politics in Hjalmar Söderberg’s 1912 novel The Serious Game [Den allvarsamma leken]. I focus on the depiction of the dissolution of the union between Sweden and Norway that took place in 1905 in order to analyze the intersection of nation and gender in fin-de-siècle discourses of liberalism. Ellen Key (depicted in the novel as “Ellen Hej”) is a key figure not only in the period’s feminist debates but also as an activist advocating for the peaceful dissolution of the union. I focus on Key and Söderberg’s views of the nation as one stage in a progressive evolution towards a cosmopolitan community, as well as Key’s controversial sexual politics. Moreover, I show how the novel naturalizes heterosexual desire in the main character Arvid’s incurable desire for Lydia. I argue finally that the melancholy tone permeating the novel is a mode of expression for liberalism’s unfinished projects of emancipation for both women and the nation.

Abstract [sv]

Denna artikel undersöker nationalism och genuspolitik i Hjalmar Söderbergs Den allvarsamma leken (1912). Jag fokuserar på romanens skildring av unionsupplösningen som skedde 1905 mellan Sverige och Norge för att analysera intersektionen av nation och genus i sekelskiftets liberala diskurser. Ellen Key (som skildras i romanen som ”Ellen Hej”) är en nyckelfigur både i feministiska debatter och i egenskap av aktivist som förespråkade en fredlig unionsupplösning. Jag lyfter Keys och Söderbergs syn på nationen som ett stadium i den progressiva utvecklingen mot en kosmopolitisk gemenskap, samt Keys kontroversiella kärlekslära. Jag visar dessutom hur romanen naturaliserar det heterosexuella begäret genom huvudpersonen Arvids obotliga begär till Lydia. Slutligen menar jag att den melankoliska stämning som genomsyrar romanen är ett uttryck för liberalismens ofullständiga emancipationsprojekt gällande såväl kvinnor som nationen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Universitetsforlaget, 2019
Keywords
Gender, sexuality, nation, dissolution of the union between Sweden and Norway, Hjalmar Söderberg, Ellen Key, Genus, sexualitet, nation, unionsupplösningen mellan Sverige och Norge, Hjalmar Söderberg, Ellen Key
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82246 (URN)10.18261/issn.1500-1989-2019-03-03 (DOI)
Note

English title: After the end of the union. Nation and gender in Hjalmar Söderberg’s The Serious Game

Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-10-02Bibliographically approved
Classon Frangos, M. (2017). The Girl Who Fell to Earth: Sophia Al-Maria’s Retro-Futurism. C21 Literature: Journal of 21st-century Writings, 5(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Girl Who Fell to Earth: Sophia Al-Maria’s Retro-Futurism
2017 (English)In: C21 Literature: Journal of 21st-century Writings, ISSN 2045-5224, Vol. 5, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article reads Sophia Al-Maria’s aesthetics of Gulf Futurism as a mode of retro-futurist nostalgia, nostalgia not for the past but for the future. Retro-futurism can be understood in terms of what Mark Fisher has called, following Jacques Derrida, “hauntology” (Fisher 2014), the project of interrogating the failure of the utopian promises of modernity on both personal and collective registers. Literary and cultural critics have long maintained that postmodernism marks a post-futurist moment in which imagined futures are pre-determined by the ideological imperatives of market capitalism. Yet, this “slow cancellation of the future” (Berardi 2011: 18) has paradoxically entailed a proliferation of 21st-century futurisms: Afro-Futurism, Sino-Futurism, Gulf Futurism, accelerationism, design fiction, climate fiction, and so forth. My argument is that, in its articulation of Gulf Futurism, The Girl Who Fell to Earthdistorts and undermines modernity’s signature narrative of development and progress, holding up a mirror to its history of broken promises and thereby challenging its imagined foreclosure of possible futures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Open Library of Humanities, 2017
National Category
Specific Literatures
Research subject
Humanities, English literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82244 (URN)10.16995/c21.44 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
Classon Frangos, M. (2017). World Expositions of Paris (1889 and 1900) and Chicago (1893 and 1933). In: Stephen Ross (Ed.), Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism: . London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>World Expositions of Paris (1889 and 1900) and Chicago (1893 and 1933)
2017 (English)In: Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism / [ed] Stephen Ross, London: Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The world expositions were monumental, public spectacles originating in the industrial fairs of early-nineteenth-century France and culminating in the Expositions Universelles of Paris (1889 and 1900) and the World’s Columbian Exposition (1893) and Century of Progress International Exposition (1933) of Chicago. The Great Exhibition of 1851 in London was among the first of the nineteenth-century industrial exhibitions featuring monumental exposition architecture with its cast-iron and glass Crystal Palace designed by Joseph Paxton (1803–1865). For cultural observers of the time as well as later critics, the Crystal Palace and later expositions – particularly the fin de siècle expositions held in Paris (1889 and 1900) and Chicago (1893) – exemplified the culture of mass consumption that had its origins in the bourgeois society of the nineteenth century. In The Arcades Project, Walter Benjamin (1892–1940) described the world expositions as ‘places of pilgrimage to the commodity fetish’ (7) in which workers were transformed into consumers through the mediation of iron and glass architecture. The American expositions of the 1930s intensified the massive displays of utopian expectation and technological progress on offer at the fairs with their exhibits of ‘dream cars’ and ‘houses of tomorrow’, monuments to Consumerism as well as science fiction visions of the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2017
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-82240 (URN)10.4324/9781135000356-REM1382-1 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
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