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Wernholm, Marina
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Wernholm, M. & Reneland-Forsman, L. (2019). Children's representation of self in social media communities. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, 23, Article ID 100346.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's representation of self in social media communities
2019 (English)In: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, ISSN 2210-6561, E-ISSN 2210-657X, Vol. 23, article id 100346Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This is a study of how children represent themselves when performing participatory identities in social media communities with relevance to constructing a learning self. Data was generated by filming eight children (6–11 years of age) talking about and showing their multimodal self-re- presentations. On their out-of-school learning journeys, the children came into presences as ‘a someone’, in social media communities. The theoretical foundation informing the study is Wenger's theory on learning as social participation. Multimodal interactional analysis was ap- plied to move the analysis beyond transcripts of texts to include actions children take with or through multimodal mediational means. The results display significant aspects of children's learning trajectories in self representation, presented as: Input from comments, understanding the other, preparing for a performing self and taking actions. Out of these acts of participation, three different participatory identities were constructed: the user, the producer and the designer. The main results show how children through participation, widen their learning repertoire and critically reflect on space and place. This research adds to the educational field by presenting children's experiences from navigating new worlds and enacting participatory identities, which is of relevance for their ongoing construction of a learning self.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Children, Digital media, Learning identities, Multimodal, Representatin of self
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88898 (URN)10.1016/j.lcsi.2019.100346 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-02 Created: 2019-09-02 Last updated: 2019-10-22
Wernholm, M. (2018). Children´s shared experiences of participating in digital communities. Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 13(4), 38-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children´s shared experiences of participating in digital communities
2018 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, ISSN 1891-943X, E-ISSN 1891-943X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 38-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to gain knowledge about children’s participation in digital communities and to develop a model that can be used as a tool for practitioners. The research question guiding the study is: What kind of participation emerges from children’s shared experiences when engaging in digital communities? Lave and Wenger’s theory about communities of practice, and their notion of legitimate peripheral participation, are used. The data consist of nine individual interviews with children. Through nexus analysis, four different kinds of participation are identified: friendship-driven, interest-driven, knowledge-driven and performance-driven. The study generates an empirical model that can be used for interpreting and understanding children’s participation. The main findings are significant aspects of participation, linked to friendship, the connection between digital cultures, learning, literacy, identity and performativity, democratic implications and practices in constant change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Universitetsforlaget, 2018
Keywords
participation, experiences, communities of practice, participatory cultures
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81918 (URN)10.18261/issn.1891-943x-2018-04-04 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070400316 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-13 Created: 2019-04-13 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Wernholm, M. & Vigmo, S. (2017). Capturing children's knowledge-making dialogues in Minecraft. In: Jocelyn Wishart & Michael Thomas (Ed.), E-research in educational contexts: The roles of technologies, ethics and social media (pp. 8-24). Oxon: Routledge, 38(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capturing children's knowledge-making dialogues in Minecraft
2017 (English)In: E-research in educational contexts: The roles of technologies, ethics and social media / [ed] Jocelyn Wishart & Michael Thomas, Oxon: Routledge, 2017, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 8-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
digital technology, ethnography, gaming, Minecraft, other- object- and self-regulation
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Computer and Information Sciences Computer Science; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Pedagogics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-66097 (URN)9781138229624 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-07-04 Created: 2017-07-04 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Wernholm, M. & Vigmo, S. (2015). Capturing children's knowledge-making dialogues in Minecraft. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, 38(3), 230-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capturing children's knowledge-making dialogues in Minecraft
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Research and Method in Education, ISSN 1743-727X, E-ISSN 1743-7288, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 230-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to address how online tools and digital technologies can influence data collection opportunities. We are still at the early stages of piecing together a more holistic picture of the role of digital media in young people's everyday lives, especially regarding digital gaming among younger children. Digital technologies have enabled both new ways of gaming together and the possibility of capturing children's everyday knowledge-making dialogues in a non-institutionalized digital environment. In this case study, the online tool FRAPS®, which enables players to record their play sessions while gaming was used to address data collection opportunities. By using this tool, the lifeworlds of children could be displayed through their knowledge-making dialogues, which also captured the resources the children use when they collaboratively played Minecraft. The analysis draws on peer learning and on Vygotsky's notions of object-regulation, other-regulation and self-regulation. The results show that language was a resource when the children collaboratively played, Minecraft® online, as enabling other-regulation. Other resources of importance connected to language use were digital tools and artefacts, such as computers, headsets, Skype and smartphones, object-regulation. The children's previous knowledge and experiences from their ordinary lifeworld used in the game also became resources. The resources can also be built into the game and regarded as affordances. The children already know how many of these affordances are used, self-regulation, and external assistance did not seem necessary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2015
Keywords
digital technology, ethnography, gaming, Minecraft, other- object- and self-regulation
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Computer and Information Sciences Computer Science; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-55225 (URN)10.1080/1743727X.2015.1033392 (DOI)000371077200002 ()2-s2.0-84946193196 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-11 Created: 2016-08-10 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
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