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Kaldo, Viktor, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6443-5279
Publications (10 of 65) Show all publications
Kaldo, V., Bothelius, K., Blom, K., Lindhe, M., Larsson, M., Karimi, K., . . . Jernelov, S. (2020). An open-ended primary-care group intervention for insomnia based on a self-help book - A randomized controlled trial and 4-year follow-up. Journal of Sleep Research, 29(1), 1-9, Article ID e12881.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An open-ended primary-care group intervention for insomnia based on a self-help book - A randomized controlled trial and 4-year follow-up
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 1-9, article id e12881Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic insomnia is a common and burdensome problem for patients seeking primary care. Cognitive behavioural therapy has been shown to be effective for insomnia, also when presented with co-morbidities, but access to sleep therapists is limited. Group-treatment and self-administered treatment via self-help books have both been shown to be efficacious treatment options, and the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of an open-ended group intervention based on a self-help book for insomnia, adapted to fit a primary-care setting. Forty primary-care patients with insomnia (mean age 55 years, 80% women) were randomized to the open-ended group intervention based on a cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia self-help book or to a care as usual/wait-list control condition. Results show high attendance to group sessions and high treatment satisfaction. Participants in the control group later received the self-help book, but without the group intervention. The book-based group treatment resulted in significantly improved insomnia severity, as well as shorter sleep-onset latency, less wake time after sleep onset, and less use of sleep medication compared with treatment as usual. The improvements were sustained at a 4-year follow-up assessment. A secondary analysis found a significant advantage of the combination of the book and the open-ended group intervention compared with when the initial control group later used only the self-help book. An open-ended treatment group based on a self-help book for insomnia thus seems to be an effective and feasible intervention for chronic insomnia in primary-care settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
cognitive behavioural therapy, sleep problems
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-91023 (URN)10.1111/jsr.12881 (DOI)000505736000006 ()31184796 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Nasri, B., Castenfors, M., Fredlund, P., Ginsberg, Y., Lindefors, N. & Kaldo, V. (2020). Group Treatment for Adults With ADHD Based on a Novel Combination of Cognitive and Dialectical Behavior Interventions: A Feasibility Study. Journal of Attention Disorders, 24(6), 904-917
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Group Treatment for Adults With ADHD Based on a Novel Combination of Cognitive and Dialectical Behavior Interventions: A Feasibility Study
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 904-917Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To evaluate feasibility and preliminary effects of a new group treatment manual for adults with ADHD and to explore adherence to treatment and its relation to outcome. Method:Eighteen adults with ADHD recruited from neuropsychiatric units in Stockholm underwent a 14-week program including combined cognitive and dialectical behavior therapy. Assessments were made at baseline, posttreatment, and follow-up, at one and six months after treatment end. Primary outcome measure was the Adult ADHD Self Report Scale version 1.1. Results/Conclusion: ADHD symptoms significantly decreased (d = 1.29) and remained stable for 6 months. Measures of depression, perceived stress, and anxiety were also significantly reduced. Attendance and patient satisfaction was high. Use, comprehension, and perceived benefit of treatment components varied from medium to high. Total use of treatment components was, in general, positively correlated with favorable outcome. The current combination of treatment components may be a valuable addition to available treatments in psychiatric care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-73970 (URN)10.1177/1087054717690231 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-05-06 Created: 2018-05-06 Last updated: 2020-05-07Bibliographically approved
Sundström, C., Eek, N., Kraepelien, M., Fahlke, C., Gajecki, M., Jakobson, M., . . . Berman, A. H. (2020). High- versus low-intensity internet interventions for alcohol use disorders: results of a three-armed randomized controlled superiority trial. Addiction, 115(5), 863-874
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High- versus low-intensity internet interventions for alcohol use disorders: results of a three-armed randomized controlled superiority trial
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2020 (English)In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 115, no 5, p. 863-874Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims To test the efficacy of a therapist-guided high-intensity internet intervention compared with an unguided low-intensity internet intervention among individuals with alcohol use disorder. Design A three-group randomized controlled trial with follow-up assessments post-treatment (12 weeks) and 6 months post-randomization (primary end-point). Settings General population sample in Sweden. Participants A total of 166 on-line self-referred adults (49% males) with a score of 14 (females)/16 (males) or more on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, a preceding week alcohol consumption of 11 (females)/14 (males) or more standard drinks and an alcohol use disorder according to a diagnostic interview. Interventions and comparators Both the high- (n = 72) and low-intensity internet interventions (n = 71) consisted of modules based on relapse prevention. Controls were on a waiting-list (n = 23), and were only followed until the post-treatment follow-up. Participants were randomized at a 7 : 7 : 2 ratio. Measurements Primary outcome was self-reported alcohol consumption in the preceding week measured as (1) number of standard drinks and (2) number of heavy drinking days at the 6-month follow-up. Findings Alcohol use disorders were largely in the severe category (74.7%), with the majority of participants having had alcohol problems for more than 5 years. Attrition was 13 and 22% at the post-treatment and 6-month follow-up, respectively. At the 6-month follow-up, an intent-to-treat analysis showed no significant differences in alcohol consumption between the high- and low-intensity interventions [standard drinks d = -0.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.50 to 0.16; heavy drinking days: d = -0.07, 95% CI = -0.40 to 0.26]. Prevalence of negative effects was somewhat low (8-14%) in both intervention groups, as was deterioration (3-5%). Conclusions At 6-month follow-up, there were no significant differences between a therapist-guided high-intensity internet intervention and an unguided low-intensity internet intervention in reducing alcohol consumption among individuals with an alcohol use disorder.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
Alcohol, alcohol use disorder, internet intervention, randomized controlled trial, treatment, cognitive behavior therapy
National Category
Substance Abuse Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-91024 (URN)10.1111/add.14871 (DOI)000505321900001 ()31691413 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-05-18
Kraepelien, M., Schibbye, R., Månsson, K., Sundström, C., Riggare, S., Andersson, G., . . . Kaldo, V. (2020). Individually Tailored Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Daily Functioning in Patients with Parkinsons Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Parkinson's Disease, 10(2), 653-664
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individually Tailored Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Daily Functioning in Patients with Parkinsons Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Parkinson's Disease, ISSN 1877-7171, E-ISSN 1877-718X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 653-664Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is often associated with psychological distress and lowered daily functioning. The availability of psychological interventions tailored for people with Parkinson is very limited. Objective: To study if guided individually-tailored internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) provide additional value to standard medical treatment for PD. Methods: Seventy-seven individuals with PD and self-reported problems with general function measured with the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS > 15) were randomized to 10 weeks of either ICBT combined with standard medical treatment, or standard medical treatment plus being on waitlist to ICBT (CONTROL). Change in the main outcome WSAS, as well as secondary measures such as quality of life, depression, anxiety and insomnia symptoms were investigated post treatment. Results: Participants receiving ICBT reported significantly higher functioning after treatment (WSAS group difference -4.56, controlled effect size g = 0.69, significant group by time interaction, W.2 = 26.23, p = 0.001). However, only around one third of participants in the treatment group were classified as treatment responders, defined as having a 30% reduction on the WSAS post treatment. Patient involvement and ratings of ICBT credibility were high. Symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia symptoms were significantly lower after treatment compared to CONTROL. There were also positive effects on Parkinson-specific function and quality of life in the treatment group. Conclusions: ICBT as an addition to standard medical treatment was credible and improved functioning for some individuals with PD. Still, the treatment needs further development in order to help a larger proportion of individuals with PD. Trial registration number: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02627885.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2020
Keywords
Internet, psychological treatment, cognitive-behavioral therapy, Parkinson's disease
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-94822 (URN)10.3233/JPD-191894 (DOI)000526818700025 ()32176657 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-05-18 Created: 2020-05-18 Last updated: 2020-05-18Bibliographically approved
Yogarajah, A., Kenter, R., Lamo, Y., Kaldo, V. & Nordgreen, T. (2020). Internet-delivered mental health treatment systems in Scandinavia – A usability evaluation. Internet Interventions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-delivered mental health treatment systems in Scandinavia – A usability evaluation
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2020 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Mental health problems are a major public health concern worldwide. Approximately 50% of the population will experience mental problems during their life. Traditional treatment is based on psychopharmacotherapy or psychotherapy, with face-to-face interaction between the patient and the therapist. New technologies such as Internet-delivered treatments are seen as an opportunity to offer more scalable and cost-efficient treatments in the field of mental health. Despite the growing interest and new evidence supporting the effect of Internet-delivered treatments is it remarkably little research on how the technology and the usability of Internet-delivered treatment programs affects the treatment. In this paper, we propose a set of evaluation criteria for evaluating the usability and the responsive design of Internet-delivered treatment systems. By our knowledge we are the first to include usability and universal design principles in the evaluation of Internet-delivered treatment systems. Our findings indicate that despite the good treatment results and proven clinical effects, the systems in general have several issues regarding usability, universal design and outdated technology. Based on our findings we propose that there should be established guidelines for testing the usability and technology of Internet-delivered treatment systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Health Informatics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93427 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2020.100314 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-04-14 Created: 2020-04-14 Last updated: 2020-05-05
Nissen, E. R., O'Connor, M., Kaldo, V., Hojris, I., Borre, M., Zachariae, R. & Mehlsen, M. (2020). Internet-delivered mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial. Psycho-Oncology, 29(1), 68-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-delivered mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial
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2020 (English)In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 68-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective Internet-delivered interventions may alleviate distress in cancer survivors with limited access to psychological face-to-face treatment. In collaboration with a group of cancer survivors, we developed and tested the efficacy of a therapist-assisted internet-delivered mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (iMBCT) program for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors. Methods A total of 1282 cancer survivors were screened for anxiety and depression during their routine oncology follow-up; eligible breast (n = 137) and prostate cancer (n = 13) survivors were randomized to iMBCT or care-as-usual (CAU) wait-list. Primary outcomes of anxiety and depression were assessed at baseline, 5 weeks, 10 weeks (post intervention), and 6 months. Results Significant effects were found for both anxiety (Cohen's d = 0.45; P = .017) and depressive symptoms (d = 0.42; P = .024) post intervention. The effects were maintained at follow-up for anxiety (d = 0.40; P = .029), but not for depressive symptoms (d = 0.28; P = .131). Conclusions Our preliminary findings suggest iMBCT to be a helpful intervention for cancer survivors suffering from symptoms of anxiety. Further studies on the efficacy for symptoms of depression are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
anxiety, breast cancer, cancer, cancer survivors, cognitive therapy, depressive symptoms, internet, mindfulness, oncology, prostate cancer
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90073 (URN)10.1002/pon.5237 (DOI)000493467900001 ()31600414 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
Forsell, E., Isacsson, N., Blom, K., Jernelov, S., Ben Abdesslem, F., Lindefors, N., . . . Kaldo, V. (2020). Predicting Treatment Failure in Regular Care Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Depression and Anxiety Using Only Weekly Symptom Measures. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 88(4), 311-321
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting Treatment Failure in Regular Care Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Depression and Anxiety Using Only Weekly Symptom Measures
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 311-321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Therapist guided Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy (ICBT) is effective, but as in traditional CBT, not all patients improve, and clinicians generally fail to identify them early enough. We predict treatment failure in 12-week regular care ICBT for Depression, Panic disorder and Social anxiety disorder, using only patients' weekly symptom ratings to identify when the accuracy of predictions exceed 2 benchmarks: (a) chance, and (b) empirically derived clinician preferences for actionable predictions. Method: Screening, pretreatment and weekly symptom ratings from 4310 regular care ICBT-patients from the Internet Psychiatry Clinic in Stockholm, Sweden was analyzed in a series of regression models each adding 1 more week of data. Final score was predicted in a holdout test sample, which was then categorized into Success or Failure (failure defined as the absence of both remitter and responder status). Classification analyses with Balanced Accuracy and 95% Confidence intervals was then compared to predefined benchmarks. Results: Benchmark 1 (better than chance) was reached 1 week into all treatments. Social anxiety disorder reached Benchmark 2 (>65%) at week 5, whereas Depression and Panic Disorder reached it at week 6. Conclusions: For depression, social anxiety and panic disorder, prediction with only patient-rated symptom scores can detect treatment failure 6 weeks into ICBT, with enough accuracy for a clinician to take action. Early identification of failing treatment attempts may be a viable way to increase the overall success rate of existing psychological treatments by providing extra clinical resources to at-risk patients, within a so-called Adaptive Treatment Strategy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2020
Keywords
cognitive behavior therapy, ehealth, Internet interventions, treatment failure, prediction
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-93127 (URN)10.1037/ccp0000462 (DOI)000518804400003 ()31829635 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-26 Created: 2020-03-26 Last updated: 2020-04-14Bibliographically approved
Hallberg, J., Kaldo, V., Arver, S., Dhejne, C., Jokinen, J. & Oberg, K. G. (2019). A Randomized Controlled Study of Group-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Hypersexual Disorder in Men. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 16(5), 733-745
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Randomized Controlled Study of Group-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Hypersexual Disorder in Men
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Sexual Medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, E-ISSN 1743-6109, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 733-745Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Hypersexual disorder (HD) is defined as a condition in which the individual loses control over engagement in sexual behaviors, leading to distress and negative effects on key life areas. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been proven to reduce symptoms of hypersexual behavior; however, no randomized controlled study of CBT interventions for HD has been reported previously. Aim: To investigate the efficacy of group-administered CBT for HD. Methods: Male participants (n = 137) diagnosed with HD, were randomized between 7 weeks of group-administered CBT (n = 70) and a waitlist control receiving the intervention after 8 weeks (n = 67). Measurements were administered at pre-, mid-, and posttreatment, with follow-up after 3 and 6 months. Outcomes: The primary outcome was the Hypersexual Disorder: Current Assessment Scale (HD: CAS), and secondary outcomes were the Sexual Compulsivity Scale (SCS) and measures of depression (Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S), psychological distress (Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), and treatment satisfaction (CSQ-8). Results: A significantly greater decrease in HD symptoms and sexual compulsivity, as well as significantly greater improvements in psychiatric well-being, were found for the treatment condition compared with the waitlist. These effects remained stable at 3 and 6 months after treatment. Clinical Implications: CBT can ameliorate HD symptoms and psychiatric distress, suggesting that the CBT program may serve as a first-line treatment in clinical settings. Strengths & Limitations: This is the first randomized controlled study evaluating the efficacy of a CBT programin a rather large sample of HD-specific diagnosed men. The long-termtreatment effects are vague due to the low response rate on follow-up measurements, and the efficacy of this program for hypersexual women remains unknown. Conclusion: This study supports the efficacy of a group-administered CBT program as a treatment option for HD; however, future studies should include women, comprise dismantling analysis of the constituting interventions, and evaluate other treatment formats, for example, administration via the Internet. Copyright (C) 2019, International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Male Sexual Desire Disorders, Basic science male behavioral, Mental Health and Male Sexuality
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-85281 (URN)10.1016/j.jsxm.2019.03.005 (DOI)000469936400015 ()30956109 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063758494 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Forsell, E., Kraepelien, M., Blom, K., Isacsson, N., Jernelov, S., Svanborg, C., . . . Kaldo, V. (2019). Development of a very brief scale for detecting and measuring panic disorder using two items from the Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report. Journal of Affective Disorders, 257, 615-622
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a very brief scale for detecting and measuring panic disorder using two items from the Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 257, p. 615-622Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To minimize the burden in detecting and monitoring Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia by developing a very brief scale with selected items from the Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report (PDSS-SR), and to investigate the proposed scale's psychometric properties in a comorbid sample. Methods: A sample of 5103 patients from the Internet Psychiatry Clinic in Sweden, diagnosed and treated with Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder (n = 1390), social anxiety disorder (n = 1313) or depression (n = 2400), responded to the PDSS-SR. Six criteria related to factor structure, sensitivity to change and clinical representativeness were used to select items. Psychometric analyses for the selected very brief scale were performed. Results: Items 2 (distress during panic attacks) and 4 (agoraphobic avoidance), were selected to create the very brief PDSS-SR version. Correlations with the full scale were high at screening, pre and post, and for change (0.87-0.93). Categorical Omega was omega(c) = 0.74. With a cut-off of 3 points, the scale could detect panic disorder in a psychiatric sample with a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 66%. Limitations: Limitations include lack of healthy controls and lack of blinding on secondary outcome measures. Conclusion: The proposed 2-item PDSS-SR version is a good candidate for a very brief panic disorder questionnaire, both for detecting cases and for measuring change. This is especially useful in clinical settings when measuring more than one condition at a time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Psychometrics, Factor analysis, Statistical, Panic disorder, Diagnostics, Psychiatry
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89255 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.057 (DOI)000482376300077 ()31349178 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-09-24Bibliographically approved
Jernelöv, S., Larsson, Y., Llenas, M., Nasri, B. & Kaldo, V. (2019). Effects and clinical feasibility of a behavioral treatment for sleep problems in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a pragmatic within-group pilot evaluation. BMC Psychiatry, 19, 1-12, Article ID 226.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects and clinical feasibility of a behavioral treatment for sleep problems in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a pragmatic within-group pilot evaluation
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2019 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 19, p. 1-12, article id 226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundSleep disturbances, including insomnia, are common in adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Treatment of choice for insomnia is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-i), but evidence is lacking for CBT-i in patients with ADHD.The purpose of this study was to investigate if patients with insomnia and other sleep problems, at a specialist clinic for ADHD, benefit from a group delivered behavioral treatment based on CBT-i; whether insomnia severity improves following this treatment.MethodsThis pragmatic within-group pilot study with a pre to post and three-month follow-up design was set at a specialist psychiatric out-patient clinic for adult ADHD.As an adjunct to care-as-usual at the clinic, a CBT-i-based group treatment targeting several sleep problems prevalent in the ADHD-population, was offered as 10 weekly 90-min group sessions and scheduled telephone support.All outcome measures were subjectively reported by participants. Data analyzed with dependent t-tests according to intent-to-treat.ResultsNineteen patients (37 [SD 13.7] years; 68% female) with ADHD and subjectively reported sleep problems provided informed consent and pre-treatment measures. Patients had suffered from sleep problems for 15.3 [SD 13.4] years, 42% used sleep medications, 79% used stimulant medication(s).At post-treatment, insomnia severity (Insomnia Severity Index; score range 0-28) had improved with 4.5 points (95% CI, 2.06-6.99, p=.002), at 3months with 6.8 points (95% CI, 4.71-8.91, p<.0001) from pre-treatment.ConclusionsCBT-i adjusted for ADHD is promising for improving insomnia severity in adult patients at specialist psychiatric out-patient clinics, who suffer from ADHD and sleep disturbances.Trial registrationStudy registered with the Regional ethical review board in Stockholm, January 13th 2016, Study id: 2015/2078-31/1. Study registered retrospectively with Clinicaltrials.org, February 21st 2019, ID: NCT03852966.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
ADHD, Sleep problems, Behavioral treatment, Pilot evaluation
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-88772 (URN)10.1186/s12888-019-2216-2 (DOI)000477043500002 ()31340804 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6443-5279

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