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Developing a carer identity and negotiating everyday life through social networking sites
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1631-6475
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
2017 (English)In: Innovation in aging, E-ISSN 2399-5300, Vol. 1, no Suppl_1, p. 465-466Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Research highlights that a key overarching reason why family carers do not utilize support services is that many people who perform the duties of caregiving do not necessarily self-identify as a carer. Understanding the development of carer identities may thus be understood as crucial for the utilization of different health services directed towards carers. Based on the EU funded Innovage project, this project aims to describe and analyse how older carers supporting and caring for an older person understand and socially negotiate their life situation and identity as carers on a Swedish online social forum. Theoretically the project departs from a constructionist approach and methodologically it has been inspired by a specifically designed method for studying the cultures and communities that emerge from online computer-mediated or Internet-based communications, called netnography. The results indicate that in the process through which a carer role is acquired, a significant change in self-perception occurs. The presence or absence of recognition for the older carers’ capacity, is understood as filtered through the needs of the cared for person, making the carer identity into an invisible self. At the same time, the opportunity for online communication may help to create a virtual space of social recognition through which negative and positive experiences attached to caring can be discussed. The significance of online communication is here understood as the possibility to be recognized, and feel empowered by other carers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017. Vol. 1, no Suppl_1, p. 465-466
National Category
Sociology Nursing
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67294DOI: 10.1093/geroni/igx004.1659OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-67294DiVA, id: diva2:1134102
Conference
21st IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, San Francisco, California, USA, July 23-27, 2017
Note

Poster

Available from: 2017-08-17 Created: 2017-08-17 Last updated: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved

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Andréasson, FridaAndreasson, JesperHanson, Elizabeth

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  • apa
  • harvard1
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Output format
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