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International Association of Athletics Federations Consensus Statement 2019: Nutrition for Athletics.
Australian Institute of Sport, Australia;Australian Catholic University, Australia.
University of Oxford, UK.
University of Connecticut, USA.
Liverpool John Moores University, UK.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism, ISSN 1526-484X, E-ISSN 1543-2742, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 73-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The International Association of Athletics Federations recognizes the importance of nutritional practices in optimizing an Athlete's well-being and performance. Although Athletics encompasses a diverse range of track-and-field events with different performance determinants, there are common goals around nutritional support for adaptation to training, optimal performance for key events, and reducing the risk of injury and illness. Periodized guidelines can be provided for the appropriate type, amount, and timing of intake of food and fluids to promote optimal health and performance across different scenarios of training and competition. Some Athletes are at risk of relative energy deficiency in sport arising from a mismatch between energy intake and exercise energy expenditure. Competition nutrition strategies may involve pre-event, within-event, and between-event eating to address requirements for carbohydrate and fluid replacement. Although a "food first" policy should underpin an Athlete's nutrition plan, there may be occasions for the judicious use of medical supplements to address nutrient deficiencies or sports foods that help the athlete to meet nutritional goals when it is impractical to eat food. Evidence-based supplements include caffeine, bicarbonate, beta-alanine, nitrate, and creatine; however, their value is specific to the characteristics of the event. Special considerations are needed for travel, challenging environments (e.g., heat and altitude); special populations (e.g., females, young and masters athletes); and restricted dietary choice (e.g., vegetarian). Ideally, each Athlete should develop a personalized, periodized, and practical nutrition plan via collaboration with their coach and accredited sports nutrition experts, to optimize their performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2019. Vol. 29, no 2, p. 73-84
Keywords [en]
RED-S, performance supplements, track and field
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-81794DOI: 10.1123/ijsnem.2019-0065ISI: 000465085500001PubMedID: 30952204Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85064997056OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-81794DiVA, id: diva2:1303631
Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Melin, Anna K.

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  • Other locale
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