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Anterior and posterior ERP rhyming effects in 3- to 5-year-old children
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language. Univ Oregon, USA;Lund university.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6731-1522
University of Massachusetts, USA. (Neurocognition and Perception Laboratory)
Dartmouth College, USA. (Reading Brains Lab, department of education)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9785-2856
University of Oregon, USA. (Brain Development Lab)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2488-6059
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2018 (English)In: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, ISSN 1878-9293, E-ISSN 1878-9307, Vol. 30, p. 178-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During early literacy skills development, rhyming is an important indicator of the phonological precursors required for reading. To determine if neural signatures of rhyming are apparent in early childhood, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from 3- to 5-year-old, preliterate children (N = 62) in an auditory prime-target nonword rhyming paradigm (e.g., bly-gry, blane-vox). Overall, nonrhyming targets elicited a larger negativity (N450) than rhyming targets over posterior regions. In contrast, rhyming targets elicited a larger negativity than nonrhyming targets over fronto-lateral sites. The amplitude of the two rhyming effects was correlated, such that a larger posterior effect occurred with a smaller anterior effect. To determine whether these neural signatures of rhyming related to phonological awareness, we divided the children into two groups based on phonological awareness scores while controlling for age and socioeconomic status. The posterior rhyming effect was stronger and more widely distributed in the group with better phonological awareness, whereas differences between groups for the anterior effect were small and not significant. This pattern of results suggests that the rhyme processes indexed by the anterior effect are developmental precursors to those indexed by the posterior effect. Overall, these findings demonstrate early establishment of distributed neurocognitive networks for rhyme processing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 30, p. 178-190
Keywords [en]
Rhyming effect Event-related potentials Phonological awareness Preschoolers Nonword processing
National Category
Languages and Literature Psychology Learning
Research subject
Humanities, English; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Education; Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-70867DOI: 10.1016/j.dcn.2018.02.011ISI: 000432146500021PubMedID: 29554639Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85044004380OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-70867DiVA, id: diva2:1214686
Funder
NIH (National Institute of Health), NIDC RO1 DC000481Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, Annika

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Andersson, AnnikaCoch, DonnaKarns, Christina M.
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