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Female immigrant entrepreneurship: Exploring international entrepreneurship through the status of Indian women entrepreneurs in Japan
Keio University, Japan ; Temple University, Japan.
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1756-6266, E-ISSN 1756-6274, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 38-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore how entrepreneurial opportunities are used by the rapidly increasing immigrant Indian female population in Japan. Given that a majority of Indian women are housewives and grew up in conservative family backgrounds, this analysis seeks to provide an insight into the situations that aided them and the challenges they faced in their entrepreneurial business ventures far from home.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a case study analysis through a semi‐structured questionnaire designed on the concept of “Life cycle of minority owned businesses” to track enterprise activity from beginning to end.

Findings

The analyses show that although respondents began their stay in Japan as housewives, they shed their image with time, used their talents and diversified into a different role without sacrificing family duties, while also creating employment opportunities for both natives and immigrants. Major hindrances faced due to socio/cultural influences, lack of government initiatives and support facilities were identified.

Research limitations/implications

The research analysis has been done on three case studies only as most available respondents were in the birth phase of their enterprises. More research is required on issues like capital availability, native employee and ethnic owner relationships, legal challenges and institutional support.

Practical implications

The paper draws attention to problem areas where changes in governance structure and social acceptance can create a more viable environment for immigrant entrepreneurs in Japan.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge, this study is the first of its kind that explores and evaluates the status of Indian female immigrant entrepreneurs in Japan. As Indian immigrants in entrepreneurial activities in Japan are increasing every year, the paper can contribute in restructuring opportunity creation and facilitate maximum advantage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 3, no 1, p. 38-55
Keywords [en]
Japan, Immigrant, women, entrepreneurs
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation; Economy, Cultural Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-75884DOI: 10.1108/17566261111114971OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-75884DiVA, id: diva2:1218291
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-08-13Bibliographically approved

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Billore, Soniya

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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