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Marginal and Mainstream: Religion, politics and identity in the contemporary US, as seen through the lens of the Kennewick Man / the Ancient One
Emory University, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0575-7075
2012 (English)In: From Archaeology to Archaeologies: The "Other" Past / [ed] Anna Simandiraki-Grimshaw, Eleni Stefanou, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2012, p. 33-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The calls to repatriate human remains and cultural items from museums and research collections back to their source communities started out as an activist movement in the 1960s among disenfranchised minorities and indigenous peoples. Today, half a century later repatriation has risen to the surface of the international cultural debate and is embraced by the establishment in many parts of the world. This movement from the marginal to the mainstream has shifted the field of archaeology and museum practices toward engaging with the public and descending communities. But this newly gained influence also invites us to reflect more critically than before over the values and ideas that underlie debates and legislations. Through the example of the  Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation  Act , and with a particular focus on the Kennewick case, this chapter critically examines the underlying values and cultural concerns that frame the repatriation debate in the United States, including a contested relationship between faith and science, the role of race in identity production and the value placed on private ownership. It is argued that these cultural values and beliefs align the repatriation movement with the American mainstream, and while they have been critically examined elsewhere in archaeological and anthropological theory, this critique has taken place predominantly in academic contexts that are completely separate from the repatriation debate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Archaeopress, 2012. p. 33-44
Keywords [en]
repatriation, identity production, past-present continuity
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78000ISBN: 978 1 4073 1007 7 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-78000DiVA, id: diva2:1250730
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2019-08-30

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Nilsson Stutz, Liv

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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