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Cognition: From Capuchin Rock Pounding to Lomekwian Flake Production
University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa. (Arkeologi)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8747-4131
Senckenberg Research Institute, Germany.
2019 (English)In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 201-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although it is sometimes suggested that modern-day chimpanzee nut-cracking behaviour is cognitively similar to early stone-tool-knapping behaviour, few systematic comparative studies have tested this assumption. Recently, two further techno-behaviours were reported that could both represent intermediary phases in hominin cognitive evolution pertaining to our ultimate technological astuteness. These behaviours are that of bearded capuchin monkeys pounding rocks and very early stone-tool knapping from Lomekwi 3. Here we use a multi-model approach to directly compare cognitive aspects required for 11 techno-behaviours, ranging from the simplest capuchin pounding behaviour to the most complex chimpanzee nut-cracking and Lomekwi 3 knapping behaviours. We demonstrate a marked difference in broad-spectrum cognitive requirements between capuchin pounding on the one hand and Lomekwian bipolar knapping on the other. Whereas the contrast is less pronounced between chimpanzee nut-cracking scenarios and basic passive-hammer knapping at Lomekwi 3, the escalation in cognitive requirement between nut cracking and bipolar knapping is a good indication that early hominin flaking techniques are cognitively more taxing than chimpanzee nut-cracking behaviour today.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019. Vol. 29, no 2, p. 201-231
National Category
Archaeology Educational Sciences Other Biological Topics
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology; Pedagogics and Educational Sciences; Natural Science, Science Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-79125DOI: 10.1017/S0959774318000550ISI: 000463186200002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85058025723OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-79125DiVA, id: diva2:1268989
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2014-2100Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Högberg, Anders

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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