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Effects of Perceived Traffic Risks, Noise, and Exhaust Smells on Bicyclist Behaviour: An Economic Evaluation
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Res Inst, Norway;Lund University.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0505-9207
Univ Appl Sci, Germany.
Victoria Transport Policy Inst, Canada.
Univ Appl Sci, Germany.
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 1-15, article id 408Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Active mode (walking, bicycling, and their variants) users are exposed to various negative externalities from motor vehicle traffic, including injury risks, noise, and air pollutants. This directly harms the users of these modes and discourages their use, creating a self-reinforcing cycle of less active travel, more motorized travel, and more harmful effects. These impacts are widely recognized but seldom quantified. This study evaluates these impacts and their consequences by measuring the additional distances that bicyclists travel in order to avoid roads with heavy motor vehicle traffic, based on a sample of German-Austrian bicycle organization members (n = 491), and monetizes the incremental costs. The results indicate that survey respondents cycle an average 6.4% longer distances to avoid traffic impacts, including injury risks, air, and noise pollution. Using standard monetization methods, these detours are estimated to impose private costs of at least Euro0.24/cycle-km, plus increased external costs when travellers shift from non-motorized to motorized modes. Conventional transport planning tends to overlook these impacts, resulting in overinvestment in roadway expansions and underinvestments in other types of transport improvements, including sidewalks, crosswalks, bikelanes, paths, traffic calming, and speed reductions. These insights should have importance for transport planning and economics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019. Vol. 11, no 2, p. 1-15, article id 408
Keywords [en]
air pollution, cost-benefit analysis, cycling, Detours, exhaust fumes, transport externalities
National Category
Environmental Sciences Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Economy; Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80563DOI: 10.3390/su11020408ISI: 000457129900112Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85059977379OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-80563DiVA, id: diva2:1289982
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Gössling, Stefan

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