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Bodybuilding and Fitness Doping in Transition: Historical Transformations and Contemporary Challenges
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1631-6475
University of Gothenburg.
2019 (English)In: Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article describes and analyses the historical development of gym and fitness culture in general and doping use in this context in particular. Theoretically, the paper utilises the concept of subculture and explores how a subcultural response can be used analytically in relation to processes of cultural normalisation as well as marginalisation. The focus is on historical and symbolic negotiations that have occurred over time, between perceived expressions of extreme body cultures and sociocultural transformations in society—with a perspective on fitness doping in public discourse. Several distinct phases in the history of fitness doping are identified. First, there is an introductory phase in the mid-1950s, in which there is an optimism connected to modernity and thoughts about scientifically-engineered bodies. Secondly, in the 1960s and 70s, a distinct bodybuilding subculture is developed, cultivating previously unseen muscular male bodies. Thirdly, there is a critical phase in the 1980s and 90s, where drugs gradually become morally objectionable. The fourth phase, the fitness revolution, can be seen as a transformational phase in gym culture. The massive bodybuilding body is replaced with the well-defined and moderately muscular fitness body, but at the same time there are strong commercialised values which contribute to the development of a new doping market. Finally, it is possible to speculate on the development of a fifth phase, in which fitness doping is increasingly being filtered into mainstream gym and fitness culture, influencing the fitness doping demography.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019. Vol. 8, no 3, p. 1-14
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Sociology Social Work
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-80945DOI: 10.3390/socsci8030080Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85063909033OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-80945DiVA, id: diva2:1293465
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Andreasson, Jesper

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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