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Sex Differences for Preferences of Shoulder to Hip Ratio in Men and Women: an Eye Tracking Study
University of Minho, Portugal.
Oklahoma State University, USA.
Stillwater, USA.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. University of Minho, Portugal. (Research in Eyes, Vision and Optometry (REVO))ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3436-2010
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2019 (English)In: Evolutionary Psychological Science, E-ISSN 2198-9885Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Shoulder to hip ratio (SHR) is a sexually dimorphic trait in humans, yet no previous study has investigated the gazing behavior and perceived physical attractiveness of men and women in relation to men and women’s SHRs. Men and women are attentive to men’s upper body and consider higher SHRs as cues to masculinity, strength, and formidability. Moreover, while women’s shoulder width varies from one individual to another, to our knowledge no previous study has investigated perceived attractiveness and eye movement in relation to women’s SHR. Therefore, in the current study, we investigated attractiveness ratings and eye movements of both men and women to front- and back-posed male and female stimuli varying in SHR. Our results showed that men prefer more masculine ratios for men and less masculine ratios for women. However, the results also showed that women preferred an intermediate SHR for both men and women in the back view while their preference in the front view is not influenced by SHR. Eye movements showed that men viewed the chest region of other men in the front and back views of stimuli, and they had longer dwell time on chests of male stimuli with higher SHRs, while no significant difference was found for dwell time on chests of female stimuli varying in SHR. Also, no differences were observed for female participants in dwell time, for either chest regions of SHRs of male stimuli or for the chests of female stimuli. Altogether, the results of this study suggest that men more than women are attentive to variations in SHRs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019.
Keywords [en]
Shoulder-to-hip ratio (SHR), Physical attractiveness, Eye tracking, Sex differences, Formidability
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology; Natural Science, Optometry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-86098DOI: 10.1007/s40806-019-00198-wOAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-86098DiVA, id: diva2:1333603
Available from: 2019-07-01 Created: 2019-07-01 Last updated: 2019-07-24

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Macedo, António Filipe

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  • apa
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