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Correlates of soccer-specific change of direction speed and reactive agility
University of Zagreb, Croatia.
Mid Sweden University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9554-1234
Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
University of Split, Croatia.
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2018 (English)In: Presented at 6th NSCA International Conference, 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Definition of Agility is based on a model that separates agility in two components, change of direction speed and perceptual and decision making processes. Based on that, two independent types of agility-performances have been identified, including change of direction speed (CODS) and reactive agility (RAG). In addition, agility is known to be a significant determinant of success in soccer due to a high perceptual and decision making skills as well as change of direction demands in soccer. CODS and RAG are generally considered as independent qualities which further suggests that they should be tested and developed separately. However, it remains unclear whether soccer-specific CODS and RAG should be regarded as disparate qualities. METHODS: Twenty young male soccer players (17.0 ± 0.9 years; 1.81 ± 0.03 cm; 70.05 ± 7.41 kg), who participated at the highest level of competition in Sweden at their age, twice reported to the lab to perform soccer specific CODS and RAG tests. First session was familiarization session while the second which consisted of actual CODS and RAG testing took place 72h later. Both CODS and RAG tests consisted of stop-and-go movement patterns which are very common in a soccer game. In addition, both tests included change of direction with the simple ball kicking template. This ball kicking template was invented to mimic defensive soccer skills of stopping the opponent’s first touch with the ball and pass interception. Participants had advanced knowledge of the movement pattern during CODS while they had to react on a visual stimulus that was followed up by change of direction during RAG. RAG testing was done throughout three different protocols (RAG1, RAG2, and RAG3) with CODS being performed once. Both tests consisted of five trials with the 10-15 seconds of rest periods between attempts and 3 minutes of rest between the protocols in RAG. Participants performed all protocols in a random order and after reliability analysis, the best performance was retained as the final result of each participant. Measurements were performed by a hardware device system based on an ATMEL micro-controller (ATMEL Corp, San Jose, CA, USA) as the core of the system. A photoelectric infrared sensor (E18-D80NK) was used as an external time triggering input, and LEDs were used as controlled outputs. Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficients (r) were calculated to reveal the relationships between the tests. RESULTS: The CODS was significantly, but moderately correlated with the RAG1 (r =.50, p <.05), RAG2 (r=.56, p<.05), and RAG3 (r=.63, p<0.01) RAG tests. DISCUSSION: Although significant relationships have been observed, the results showed that the CODS test and RAG tests share only 25, 31 and 39% of the common variance which suggests them being independent qualities. Practitioners in soccer should be looking at these qualities in a unique way with the aim to test and develop them separately.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keywords [en]
pre-planned agility, non-planned agility, conditioning capacities, team sports
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sport Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89393OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-89393DiVA, id: diva2:1357060
Conference
6th NSCA International Conference, 26-29 September, 2018, Campus Alcobendas, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Spain
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-10-03Bibliographically approved

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Pojskić, Haris

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4748495051525350 of 96
CiteExportLink to record
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