lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rapid plant colonization of the forelands of a vanishing glacier is strongly associated with species traits
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8022-5004
Thunen Inst Biodivers, Germany.
Univ Göttingen, Germany.
Univ Tartu, Estonia.
2019 (English)In: Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine research, ISSN 1523-0430, E-ISSN 1938-4246, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 366-378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recently developed glacier forelands provide valuable insights into vegetation dynamics. We studied the vascular plants in the glacier forelands of the Almajallojekna glacier in comparison to the plants in the surrounding area. The glacier is retreating rapidly at an average rate of 0.17 km(2) per year from 1898 to 2012. In the newly emerged glacier forelands, we found that 32 percent of the 381 plant taxa occurred in the surrounding region. Sixty-eight plant species were present on the youngest terrain (0-31 y), an additional thirteen species occurred on terrain aged 32-53 years, and an additional forty-two species were detected on terrain aged 54-114 years. Of the surrounding species pool, plant species that had successfully established in recently deglaciated terrains were characterized by high regional abundance and low seed weight, and they were more likely to be members of the plant families Saxifragaceae, Salicaceae, and Asteraceae. Woody plant species with a preference for well-drained soils were more likely to be present in the youngest terrain. Our results show that the vegetation of glacier forelands is developing rapidly depending on the plant species in the surrounding area and the species' life-history traits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019. Vol. 51, no 1, p. 366-378
Keywords [en]
Colonization rate, emerging ecosystems, environmental change, glacier retreat, life-history traits
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-89420DOI: 10.1080/15230430.2019.1646574ISI: 000486105800026OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-89420DiVA, id: diva2:1357342
Available from: 2019-10-03 Created: 2019-10-03 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Franzén, Markus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Franzén, Markus
By organisation
Department of Biology and Environmental Science
In the same journal
Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine research
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 5 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf