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Experiences of psychological flow as described by people diagnosed with and treated for head and neck cancer
Jönköping University, Sweden.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. (Centre of Interprofessional Collaboration within Emergency care (CICE))
Jönköping University, Sweden.
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 43, p. 1-8, article id 101671Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe flow as experienced by people diagnosed with and treated for head and neck cancer. Method: A descriptive design based on a deductive qualitative content analysis was used to explain Csikszentmihalyi's flow theory from the perspective of people living with head and neck cancer. Interviews were conducted with seven participants diagnosed with and treated for different forms and stages of head and neck cancer. Results: Experiences of flow were associated with people's interests, skill levels and actions involving and creating both happiness and the feeling of something worth living for. Optimal flow was a state of consciousness in which mind and body work together, and the people were completely absorbed in an activity related to nature, hobbies or family. Microflow occurred as part of everyday life, relieving stress and anxiety and helping them to focus on their daily routines. This included humming, listening to the radio or watching TV. Conclusions: The peoples inner strength and desire to feel better made flow possible, and they used unknown skills that enhanced self-satisfaction. Managing self-care activities increased feelings of control, participation and enjoyment. This calls for person-centred care with a salutogenic approach based on the peoples own interests, skill levels and actions; what makes the person feel happy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 43, p. 1-8, article id 101671
Keywords [en]
Empowerment, Flow theory, Happiness, Head and neck cancer, Life experiences, Person-centred care, Qualitative content analysis, Salutogenic approach
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Psychology Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-91027DOI: 10.1016/j.ejon.2019.09.012ISI: 000505109300009PubMedID: 31622871OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-91027DiVA, id: diva2:1386814
Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved

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Fridlund, Bengt

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