lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Will future immigration to Sweden make it easier to finance the welfare system?
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics. (Centrum för arbetsmarknadspolitisk forskning (CAFO) Nationalekonomi och statistik)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9374-3652
2011 (English)In: European Journal of Population, ISSN 0168-6577, E-ISSN 1572-9885, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 103-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract

 

Will future immigration to a country with a large public sector alleviate

the increasing burden on the public welfare system due to an ageing population?

The question is based on the experience that the age structure of

immigrants differs from that of the native population. Fiscal impacts due to

immigration depend mainly on the size, the age composition and the labour market

integration of the additional population which arises because of immigration. A

projection from Statistics Sweden about future immigration combined with the

latest Long-Term Survey of the Swedish Economy has been used in this study.

Calculations for Sweden up to the year 2050 show that the positive net contribution

to the public sector from the additional population is rather small even with

good integration into the labour market. The reason is that future immigration will

increase the size of the population and thereby raise not only revenue from taxation

but also public expenses. The fiscal impact is sensitive to the labour market

integration of the additional population. The yearly positive/negative net contribution

effect is less than 1% of GDP for most of the years. On the whole, the

results are about the same even if we change the assumptions concerning the

composition of future public revenues, the growth of public expenses, return

migration, or the age-specific birth and death rates in the additional population.

More considerable net fiscal effects would require a much higher and probably

unrealistic level of future immigration.

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SpringerLink , 2011. Vol. 27, no 1, p. 103-124
Keywords [en]
Immigration, Public sector, Age structure, Additional population, Employment
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economy, Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vxu:diva-7191DOI: 10.1007/s10680-010-9227-5Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-78651510425OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vxu-7191DiVA, id: diva2:297897
Available from: 2010-02-19 Created: 2010-02-19 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Ekberg, Jan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ekberg, Jan
By organisation
Linnaeus School of Business and Economics
In the same journal
European Journal of Population
Economics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 218 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf