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Ocean urea fertilization for carbon credits poses high ecological risks
University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences. (MPEA)
University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7155-3604
University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
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2008 (English)In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 1049-1056Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The proposed plan for enrichment of the Sulu Sea, Philippines, a region of rich marine biodiversity, with thousands of tonnes of urea in order to stimulate algal blooms and sequester carbon is flawed for multiple reasons. Urea is preferentially used as a nitrogen source by some cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates, many of which are neutrally or positively buoyant. Biological pumps to the deep sea are classically leaky, and the inefficient burial of new biomass makes the estimation of a net loss of carbon from the atmosphere questionable at best. The potential for growth of toxic dinoflagellates is also high, as many grow well on urea and some even increase their toxicity when grown on urea. Many toxic dinoflagellates form cysts which can settle to the sediment and germinate in subsequent years, forming new blooms even without further fertilization. If large-scale blooms do occur, it is likely that they will contribute to hypoxia in the bottom waters upon decomposition. Lastly, urea production requires fossil fuel usage, further limiting the potential for net carbon sequestration. The environmental and economic impacts are potentially great and need to be rigorously assessed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 56, no 6, p. 1049-1056
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-2091DOI: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2008.03.010ISI: 000257377400014PubMedID: 18439628OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-2091DiVA, id: diva2:309141
Available from: 2010-04-06 Created: 2010-04-06 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved

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Granéli, EdnaLegrand, CatherineSalomon, Paulo

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