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Norms, knowledge claims and authorities as justifications in students' reasoning about using new technology in societal practice
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. (Network for Science Education Research & Development)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9132-8615
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. (Network for Science Education Research & Development)
2011 (English)In: Science & Culture: Promise, Challenge and Demand, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki , 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The present study investigates how students draw on norms, knowledge claims and authorities when reasoning about socioscientific issues. The aim of the study is to provide an image of students' sense of agency and how they handle trust and security issues by referring to the above mentioned modalities of the societal structures ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ (Giddens 1984). Examples from gene technology were used as the subject for interviews with 13 Swedish high-school students (year 11, age 17-18). At the time for interviews, the students had participated in and completed an introductory course in genetics which included a group discussion about genetic diseases and ethics. A grid based on modalities from the societal structures described by Giddens was used for analysis of interviews. Students were found to use both modalities for ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ to justify acceptance or rejection of new technology. By doing that, they showed how norms as well as knowledge claims can be used to justify opposing position as they were trying to build trust in either science and technology or in experts. It was found that students accepted or rejected the authority of experts based on their having or lacking appropriate knowledge. Students were also found to have difficulty in discerning between material risks (reduced safety) and immaterial risks (loss of norms). Attention is drawn to the problem of students' using knowledge claims (Domination) to support norms (Legitimation). Furthermore, students' sense of agency appears to be dependent on sharing norms with experts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki , 2011.
National Category
Educational Sciences Philosophy
Research subject
Natural Science, Science Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-14359OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-14359DiVA, id: diva2:443118
Conference
11th International IHPST and 6th Greek History, Philosophy and Science Teaching Joint Conference
Projects
Understanding the Formation of Scientific Literacy Through Socioscientific Issues: A Study on Student Discourse and Reasoning CapabilitiesLife sciences in education – an encounter with academic knowledge and moralsAvailable from: 2011-09-23 Created: 2011-09-23 Last updated: 2015-09-16Bibliographically approved

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Lindahl, MatsLinder, Cedric

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf