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Response of marine bacterioplankton pH homeostasis gene expression to elevated CO2
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8779-6464
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS)
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2016 (English)In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 483-487Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human-induced ocean acidification impacts marine life. Marine bacteria are major drivers of biogeochemical nutrient cycles and energy fluxes1; hence, understanding their performance under projected climate change scenarios is crucial for assessing ecosystem functioning. Whereas genetic and physiological responses of phytoplankton to ocean acidification are being disentangled2, 3, 4, corresponding functional responses of bacterioplankton to pH reduction from elevated CO2 are essentially unknown. Here we show, from metatranscriptome analyses of a phytoplankton bloom mesocosm experiment, that marine bacteria responded to lowered pH by enhancing the expression of genes encoding proton pumps, such as respiration complexes, proteorhodopsin and membrane transporters. Moreover, taxonomic transcript analysis showed that distinct bacterial groups expressed different pH homeostasis genes in response to elevated CO2. These responses were substantial for numerous pH homeostasis genes under low-chlorophyll conditions (chlorophyll a <2.5 μg l−1); however, the changes in gene expression under high-chlorophyll conditions (chlorophyll a >20 μg l−1) were low. Given that proton expulsion through pH homeostasis mechanisms is energetically costly, these findings suggest that bacterioplankton adaptation to ocean acidification could have long-term effects on the economy of ocean ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 6, no 5, p. 483-487
National Category
Microbiology Ecology Climate Research
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-49969DOI: 10.1038/nclimate2914ISI: 000375125200015Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84964949342OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-49969DiVA, id: diva2:907477
Projects
EcoChangeAvailable from: 2016-02-29 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Bacterioplankton in the light of seasonality and environmental drivers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bacterioplankton in the light of seasonality and environmental drivers
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Bacterioplankton are keystone organisms in marine ecosystems. They are important for element cycles, by transforming dissolved organic carbon and other nutrients. Bacterioplankton community composition and productivity rates change in surface waters over spatial and temporal scales. Yet, many underlying biological processes determining when, why and how bacterioplankton react to changes in environmental conditions are poorly understood. Here, I used experiments with model bacteria and natural assemblages as well as field studies to determine molecular, physiological and ecological responses allowing marine bacteria to adapt to their environment.

Experiments with the flavobacterium Dokdonia sp. MED134 aimed to determine how the metabolism of bacteria is influenced by light and different organic matter. Under light exposure, Dokdonia sp. MED134 expressed proteorhodopsin and adjusted its metabolism to use resources more efficiently when growing with lower-quality organic matter. Similar expression patterns were found in oceanic datasets, implying a global importance of photoheterotrophic metabolisms for the ecology of bacterioplankton.

Further, I investigated how the composition and physiology of bacterial assemblages are affected by elevated CO2 concentrations and inorganic nutrients. In a large-scale experiment, bacterioplankton could keep productivity and community structure unaltered by adapting the gene expression under CO2 stress. To maintain pH homeostasis, bacteria induced higher expression of genes related to respiration, membrane transport and light acquisition under low-nutrient conditions. Under high-nutrient conditions with phytoplankton blooms, such regulatory mechanisms were not necessary. These findings indicate that open ocean systems are more vulnerable to ocean acidification than coastal waters.

Lastly, I used field studies to resolve how bacterioplankton is influenced by environmental changes, and how this leads to seasonal succession of marine bacteria. Using high frequency sampling over three years, we uncovered notable variability both between and within years in several biological features that rapidly changed over short time scales. These included potential phytoplankton-bacteria linkages, substrate uptake rates, and shifts in bacterial community structure. Thus, high resolution time series can provide important insights into the mechanisms controlling microbial communities.

Overall, this thesis highlights the advantages of combining molecular and traditional oceanographic methodological approaches to study ecosystems at high resolution for improving our understanding of the physiology and ecology of microbial communities and, ultimately, how they influence biogeochemical processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2017. p. 62
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations ; 303/2017
Keywords
marine bacteria, marine microbiology, seasonal succession, ocean acidification, proteorhodopsin, photoheterotrophy, microbial time series
National Category
Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology; Ecology, Microbiology; Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-69130 (URN)978-91-88761-03-3 (ISBN)978-91-88761-02-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-01-12, Fullriggaren, Sjöfartshögskolan, Kalmar, 09:30 (English)
Supervisors
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGESwedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2018-02-21Bibliographically approved
2. Exploring gene expression responses of marine bacteria to environmental factors
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring gene expression responses of marine bacteria to environmental factors
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Bacterioplankton are abundant in marine ecosystems, where they as “masters of transformation” of dissolved organic matter (DOM) are important for energy fluxes and biogeochemical cycles. However, the performance of bacteria in a changing marine environment influenced by anthropogenic activities is poorly understood. In this thesis, I did experiments with model bacteria and natural assemblages of bacteria, using microbiology methods combined with modern molecular tools, to investigate responses of marine bacteria to changes in environmental conditions like ocean acidification, organic pollution and organic matter released by phytoplankton. Experiments with a model gammaproteobacterium demonstrated that bacteria in stationary phase showed little responses to organic pollutants, whereas pollutants caused decreased bacterial growth and had a broad physiological impact on actively growing bacteria (as deduced from gene expression analysis). In an experiment with two distantly related marine model bacteria, we identified several important bacterial mechanisms, such as uptake of macromolecules and phosphonates, by which bacteria respond when exposed to DOM produced by photosynthetic dinoflagellates. Using natural bacterial communities in a Baltic Sea mesocosm experiment with the addition of river water from a forested or an agriculture influenced catchment area, we showed important interactions between river water type and the development of phytoplankton blooms that caused different bacterial gene expression activities. In the fourth set of experiments, marine bacterial communities were subjected to elevated CO2, to mimic ocean acidification, under high and low nutrient conditions in a mesocosm study. We found increased bacterial gene expression activity focused on maintaining pH homeostasis, but only under low nutrient conditions, indicating that bacteria focus on cell maintenance instead of growth when challenged by lowered pH. Finally, in a computational analysis, we compared genomes from yet uncultivated prokaryotes by two different strategies: metagenome assembled and single amplified genomes. Importantly, the analysis showed that both methods selected abundant taxa and generated nearly identical sequences in overlapping regions. To conclude, this thesis presents discoveries that will help form a better understanding of marine bacterial responses to present and future anthropogenic disturbances of marine ecosystems.

Abstract [sv]

Marina bakterier är abundanta och återfinns i alla marina ekosystem, där de som nedbrytare av organiskt material spelar en avgörande roll i att reglera flödet av energi och näringsämnenas kretslopp. Dock saknar vi kunskap om hur bakterieplankton reagerar på miljöförändringar i haven. Därtill är de molekylära mekanismerna för omsättningen av löst organiskt material från olika källor ofullständigt kända. I denna avhandling har jag med hjälp av bakterieisolat och naturliga bakteriesamhällen undersökt hur marina bakterier svarar på miljöförändringar genom att kombinera metoder inom klassisk mikrobiologi och moderna molekylärbiologiska verktyg. Det övergripande syftet med denna avhandling var att få en bättre förståelse för hur bakterier svarar på havsförsurning, organiska föroreningar och löst organisk kol utsöndrat av växtplankton. Under ett experiment med ett bakterieisolat inom klassen Gammaproteobacteria, uppvisade bakterierna svagare respons för organiska föroreningar då de befann sig i stationär fas än i en aktiv tillväxtfas. Detta märktes både genom minskad tillväxt och fysiologiska ändringar uppmätta genom genuttryck i bakterien. Vidare experiment med två skilda modellbakterier kunde vi identifiera viktiga processer såsom upptag av makromolekyler och fosfonater, som svar på tillsats av löst organiskt material producerat av dinoflagellater. I ett annat experiment använde vi naturliga bakteriesamhällen i vatten från Östersjön i ett storskaligt experiment, där vatten från floder i avrinningsområden dominerade antingen av skog eller jordbruk tillsattes. I detta experiment kunde vi visa hur vattnets ursprung påverkade utvecklingen av algblomningarna som i sin tur orsakade olika aktivitet i bakteriernas genuttryck. Vidare så undersöktes hur marina bakteriesamhällen påverkas av förhöjda CO2-halter under låg och hög näringstillgång. Det visade sig att bakterierna ökade sin aktivitet för att bibehålla pH-homeostasen, men bara under låg koncentration av näringsämnen. Detta innebar att bakterierna behövde ställa om sin ämnesomsättning från tillväxt till att lägga energi på att hantera syran i oligotrofa miljöer. Slutligen genomfördes dataanalyser där två metoder för att studera arvsmassan i bakterier tagna direkt från haven jämfördes. Vår studie visade att de två metoderna i viss mån kompletterade varandra men framför allt kunde vi bekräfta att ingen av de två uppvisade några systematiska fel. Sammanfattningsvis presenterar denna avhandling upptäcker som ger oss en bättre förståelse för hur marina bakterier i marina ekosystem svarar på nutida och framtida miljöförändringar orsakade av människor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2019
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations ; 371/2019
Keywords
Baltic Sea, dissolved organic matter, model bacteria, ocean acidification, organic pollutants, river loadings, transcriptomics
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-90261 (URN)978-91-89081-19-2 (ISBN)978-91-89081-20-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-12-18, Fregatten Ma117 campus Kalmar, Kalmar, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-11-25 Created: 2019-11-25 Last updated: 2019-12-03Bibliographically approved

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Bunse, CarinaLundin, DanielKarlsson, Christofer M. G.Akram, NeelamPalovaara, JoakimSvensson, LovisaHolmfeldt, KarinDopson, MarkPinhassi, Jarone

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