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Satyrs, Prototypes and Emulation: Creating Past and Present in English Satire of the 1590s
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2469-6431
2016 (English)In: Presented at Renaissance Prototypes : Conference at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, 2016Conference paper, Abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The present paper examines the complex interplay between classical prototype and early modern practice in that most metamorphic  type of writing: satire. Variously labeled a “mode” and a “genre” by modern critics, satire as produced in late Elizabethan and Jacobean England is indebted to well known classical role models such as Juvenal, Horace and Persius; yet it also stretches across other forms of writing such as drama, and distinctions such as that between “formal” and “Menippean” satire are only partly valid when mapping the complexities of satire evinced in for example well known poets such as Donne and Jonson, but also in the vogue for satirical literature in the 1590s as represented by for example John Marston, Joseph Hall and Thomas Nashe. While these authors have often been dismissed using adjectives like “marginal”, they were widely read in their own time, and Hall even claimed (mistakenly) to be the first satirist in the English language. Thus, the myth of a satirical “beginning” in the English Renaissance opens up a broad discussion on canonicity, origin and projected future – all too neglected in the discussion of a mode of writing that has received renewed attention in the wake of recent political and medial development. Satire, in short, offers provocative ways of considering both the past of the Renaissance and the Renaissance as past.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
Keyword [en]
satire, prototypes, emulation, early modern literature, masculinity, John Marston, John Donne, Everard Guilpin, Joseph Hall
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-57030OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-57030DiVA: diva2:1015105
Conference
Renaissance Prototypes: Conference at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters
Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-04 Last updated: 2017-04-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf