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Health and Social Service Access Among Family Caregivers of People with Parkinson's Disease
Lund University.
Lund University.
Ersta Sköndal Univ Coll ; Capio Palliat Care Unit, Stockholm ; Linköping University.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0961-5250
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Parkinson's Disease, ISSN 1877-7171, E-ISSN 1877-718X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 581-587Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Being a family caregiver for a person with Parkinson's disease (PD) can negatively impact health and wellbeing, but it appears less clear to what extent caregivers' health/social service needs are met. Objective: We explored the extent to which PD family caregivers experience sufficient access to health/social services, as compared to age-matched controls; and the associations between this and demographic and health-related variables. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 66 PD family caregivers and 79 age-matched control subjects including the SF-36 health survey, the Nottingham Health Profile Sleep section (NHP-Sleep), and questions regarding contacts with various health/social related services and whether these were perceived as sufficient. Results: People reporting insufficient access (n = 29) were more often PD family caregivers than controls (83% vs. 37%), did more often have a disease of their own (79% vs. 46%), and reported poorer health according to the SF-36 and the NHP-Sleep. Being a PD family caregiver (OR, 8.90), reporting more pain (OR, 1.02) and having an own disease (OR, 3.46) were independently associated with insufficient health/social service access. Conclusions: Our results imply that those in greatest need for health/social services (i.e., those with poorer health, an own disease, and who are PD family caregivers) are those whose health/social service needs are least met. Larger studies are needed for firmer conclusions and regarding how unmet health/social service needs impacts caregiver health and wellbeing. Health/social service providers should not only focus on patients but also consider their family members' needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 6, no 3, p. 581-587
Keywords [en]
Caregivers, health, health services needs and demand, Parkinson disease
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-57464DOI: 10.3233/JPD-160811ISI: 000383803000012PubMedID: 27176624Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84983751678OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-57464DiVA, id: diva2:1039872
Available from: 2016-10-25 Created: 2016-10-19 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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Årestedt, Kristofer

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