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The association between blood pressure and lipid levels in Europe: European study on cardiovascular risk prevention and management in usual daily practice
University of Bologna, Italy.
Univ Autonoma Madrid IdiPaz, Spain ; Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain.
Univ Ghent, Belgium.
Univ Lille Nord France, France.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 2155-2163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives:Several studies have suggested a positive association between serum lipid levels and blood pressure (BP). This study investigated this association in a large population from 12 European countries.Methods:Data were taken from the European Study on Cardiovascular Risk Prevention and Management in Usual Daily Practice (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00882336). Associations between BP and lipid levels in patients free from cardiovascular disease and with at least one major cardiovascular disease risk factor (N=7641) were assessed using linear regression analyses.Results:Overall, 72.8 and 64.8% of patients had hypertension and dyslipidaemia, respectively; 47.0% had both conditions. Regression coefficients (95% confidence interval) for the associations of LDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, total cholesterol and apolipoprotein B levels with SBP, adjusted for age, sex and BMI, were 0.93mmHg/mmol per l (0.54-1.31), 1.07mmHg/mmol per l (0.73-1.40), 1.02mmHg/mmol per l (0.69-1.35) and 4.94mmHg/g per l (3.43-6.46), respectively. The corresponding values (95% confidence interval) for the associations with DBP were 0.96mmHg/mmol per l (0.73-1.19), 0.95mmHg/mmol per l (0.75-1.15), 0.87mmHg/mmol per l (0.67-1.07) and 4.33mmHg/g per l (3.42-5.23), respectively. Most of these associations remained significant whether patients were treated with statins or not.Conclusion:Small but statistically significant associations between lipid levels and BP were observed in a large, multinational European population. Further research is warranted to assess the causality of this association and its implications on the management of patients with both hypertension and dyslipidaemia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 34, no 11, p. 2155-2163
Keywords [en]
Blood pressure, Cholesterol, Dyslipidaemia, Hypertension
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-58082DOI: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000001078ISI: 000385536600010PubMedID: 27512970Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84981501503OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-58082DiVA, id: diva2:1046068
Available from: 2016-11-11 Created: 2016-11-11 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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Perk, Joep

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