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The Mediterranean Exotic as Nostalgia: Lost Worlds and Found Worlds in D.H. Lawrence’s The Lost Girl
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. (Linnaeus University Research Center for Intermedial and Multimodal Studies)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0115-4995
2016 (English)In: Mediterranean Modernism. Origins and Otherness in 20th Century «Modernisms», 2016Conference paper, Presentation (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates why there is an inclination in modernism to portray nostalgic space with Southern territories, and more specifically, in the case of D. H Lawrence’s The Lost Girl (1920), with the Mediterranean. The modernists’ exploration of nostalgic moods and tropes is well documented; the First World War became a symbolic rupture between past and present in contemporary imagination, and many modernist texts works structurally with split narratives, where a fathomed present is contrasted by a vigorous past, thematically and stylistically. Similarly, D. H. Lawrence’s works explicitly make use of this strategy of juxtaposing the natural and the cultural, as can be seen in The Rainbow and Women in Love. Lawrence’s relationship to the Mediterranean is ambivalent, but is situated within a historical context of the Mediterranean as both a location of an epistemological and escapist nature. In The Lost Girl, Lawrence’s earlier ironic ridicule of the South has been replaced by a genuine belief in the undeveloped Mediterranean backwater as a representative of a natural human state of cosmic unity. The well-documented nostalgia for a paradisiacal past, as the Mediterranean South represents in Northern and Western culture, this paper argues, is utilized in The Lost Girl in order to create a modernist critique of industrialization and progress. This paper illustrates Lawrence’s specific stylistic approach to Mediterranean nostalgia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
Keyword [en]
modernism, d.h. lawrende, lost girl, nostalgia
National Category
General Literature Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Comparative literature
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-58835OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-58835DiVA: diva2:1054698
Conference
Mediterranean Modernism. Origins and Otherness in 20th Century «Modernisms». Norwegian Institute, Roma, 3-4 October
Note

Ej belagd 161212

Available from: 2016-12-09 Created: 2016-12-09 Last updated: 2016-12-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf