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Former dump sites and the landfill mining perspectives in baltic countries and Sweden: The status
University of Latvia, Latvia.
Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia.
Latvia University of Agriculture, Latvia.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
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2013 (English)In: SGEM2013 Conference Proceedings, 2013, p. 485-492Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Landfills are considered as places where the life cycle of products ends thus meaning that resources and materials, which before were valuables, become useless and are disposed forever in places away from the sight. Landfills that were not closed appropriately are of primary importance as the EU legislation demands closure of noncompliant landfills, re-cultivation followed by soil and groundwater remediation. Waste dumps in former times were created without any environmental planning and it causes problems. Planned actions to reduce and prevent impacts to the environment and get extracted valuables from dump sites are proposed in a new approach known as "landfill mining" (LFM). The number of dumpsites which are still not appropriately closed according to the EU Directives has diminished, but not completely. Landfills that are located close to the Baltic Sea and Black Seas could be good candidates for LFM. This research topic has had evolved in many aspects with the interest increase on material recovery, refuse derived fuels (RDF) production, greenhouse gas and leachate emission diminishing. Real-time applied LFM in last decade in Sweden has started and Estonian scientists and entrepreneurs took over the initiative - the project in Saaremaa Island is an example of closing the life cycle of dumpsites by following a more sustainable approach. The rise of raw material and energy costs promotes the process of LFM to be economically feasible, but this approach must be adjusted in regulations (permittingprohibiting schemes, environmental impact assessment, staff safety, monitoring).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. p. 485-492
Keyword [en]
Monitoring, RDF, Remediation, Resource recovery
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59207DOI: 10.5593/SGEM2013/BA1.V1/S03.035ISI: 000349063400066Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84890259372ISBN: 9789549181876 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-59207DiVA: diva2:1058194
Conference
13th SGEM GeoConference on Science and Technologies In Geology, Exploration and Mining, 16 June 2013 through 22 June 2013, Albena
Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved

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Kaczala, FabioHogland, William

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf