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Large-scale maps of variable infection efficiencies in aquatic Bacteroidetes phage-host model systems
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Univ Arizona, USA. (Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, EEMiS)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6887-6661
Univ Arizona, USA ; Ohio State Univ, USA.
Univ Arizona, USA ; Ohio State Univ, USA.
Univ Arizona, USA.
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2016 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 18, no 11, 3949-3961 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microbes drive ecosystem functioning and their viruses modulate these impacts through mortality, gene transfer and metabolic reprogramming. Despite the importance of virus-host interactions and likely variable infection efficiencies of individual phages across hosts, such variability is seldom quantified. Here, we quantify infection efficiencies of 38 phages against 19 host strains in aquatic Cellulophaga (Bacteroidetes) phage-host model systems. Binary data revealed that some phages infected only one strain while others infected 17, whereas quantitative data revealed that efficiency of infection could vary 10 orders of magnitude, even among phages within one population. This provides a baseline for understanding and modeling intrapopulation host range variation. Genera specific host ranges were also informative. For example, the Cellulophaga Microviridae, showed a markedly broader intra-species host range than previously observed in Escherichia coli systems. Further, one phage genus, Cba41, was examined to investigate nonheritable changes in plating efficiency and burst size that depended on which host strain it most recently infected. While consistent with host modification of phage DNA, no differences in nucleotide sequence or DNA modifications were detected, leaving the observation repeatable, but the mechanism unresolved. Overall, this study highlights the importance of quantitatively considering replication variations in studies of phage-host interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 18, no 11, 3949-3961 p.
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
Research subject
Ecology, Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59469DOI: 10.1111/1462-2920.13392ISI: 000388614800026PubMedID: 27235779OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-59469DiVA: diva2:1059753
Available from: 2016-12-23 Created: 2016-12-23 Last updated: 2017-04-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • Other locale
More languages
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