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Following international trends while subject to past traditions: neuropsychological test use in the Nordic countries
Vestfold Hosp Trust, Norway ; Univ Oslo, Norway.
Univ Oslo, Norway ;Sunnaas Rehabil Hosp, Norway.
Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
Univ Helsinki, Finland ; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland.
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2016 (English)In: Clinical Neuropsychologist (Neuropsychology, Development and Cognition: Section D), ISSN 1385-4046, E-ISSN 1744-4144, Vol. 30, 1479-1500 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Historically, the neuropsychological test traditions of the four Nordic countries have spanned from the flexible and qualitative tradition of Luria-Christensen to the quantitative large battery approach of Halstead and Klove-Matthews. This study reports current test use and discusses whether these traditions still influence attitudes toward test use and choice of tests. Method: The study is based on survey data from 702 Nordic neuropsychologists. Results: The average participant used 9 tests in a standard assessment, and 25 tests overall in their practice. Test use was moderated by nationality, competence level, practice profile, and by attitude toward test selection. Participants who chose their tests flexibly used fewer tests than those adhering to the flexible battery approach, but had fewer tests from which to choose. Testing patients with psychiatric disorders was associated with using more tests. IQ, memory, attention, and executive function were the domains with the largest utilization rate, while tests of motor, visual/spatial, and language were used by few. There is a lack of academic achievement tests. Screening tests played a minor role in specialized assessments, and symptom validity tests were seldom applied on a standard basis. Most tests were of Anglo-American origin. Conclusions: New test methods are implemented rapidly in the Nordic countries, but test selection is also characterized by the dominating position of established and much researched tests. The Halstead-Reitan and Luria traditions are currently weak, but national differences in size of test batteries seem to be influenced by these longstanding traditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 30, 1479-1500 p.
Keyword [en]
Nordic neuropscychology, test use, clinical practice, Halstead-Reitan, Luria
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-59472DOI: 10.1080/13854046.2016.1237675ISI: 000389024800006PubMedID: 27670676OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-59472DiVA: diva2:1059755
Available from: 2016-12-23 Created: 2016-12-23 Last updated: 2016-12-23Bibliographically approved

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Persson, Bengt A.
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf